Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsFamilies
IN THE NEWS

Families

NEWS
September 15, 2011 | By Jen Leo, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Dare to do something different this Saturday. Here are six travel websites to up your game when it comes to planning a weekend activity, stellar first date or family outing. Kijubi : What could you be doing? Dust off your stale cubicle life. This is a great resource for active vacationers, friends looking to gift “experiences” to their besties, or couples and families looking for the thrill of adventure on land, in the air, or in the water. Urban Daddy : Get ready to push the envelope.
Advertisement
NEWS
September 11, 2012 | By Michael A. Memoli
Vice President Joe Biden drew on tragedy in his own life as he shared in the grief of families of victims of Flight 93 on Tuesday, offering his hope on the 11th anniversary of 9/11 that each passing year brings them additional comfort. Biden lost his wife and infant daughter in a car accident, which also seriously injured his two young sons, just weeks after he was first elected to the Senate 40 years ago. He said at a Tuesday gathering in Shanksville, Pa., that he understood that "no matter how many anniversaries you experience, for at least an instant, the terror of that moment returns," and how it can feel "like you're being sucked into a black hole in the middle of your chest.
TRAVEL
November 25, 2012 | By Jen Leo
The family-travel website that moms and dads didn't even know they wanted - let alone needed. Name: Minitime.com What it does: Introduces kid-friendly destinations - along with kid-friendly hotels - in the United States, Canada, Caribbean and Mexico. What's hot: What slingshots this new family travel website to the head of the line is that its travel suggestions are based on the age of your kids. Just punch in the ages (up to three should cover the range) and check out its destination and hotel suggestions, accompanied by photos from real families.
OPINION
June 3, 2012 | By Kay S. Hymowitz
The single-mother revolution shouldn't need much introduction. It started in the 1960s when the nation began to sever the historical connection between marriage and childbearing and to turn single motherhood and the fatherless family into a viable, even welcome, arrangement for children and for society. The reasons for the shift were many, including the sexual revolution, a powerful strain of anti-marriage feminism and a "super bug" of American individualism that hit the country in the 1960s and '70s.
NATIONAL
July 2, 2011 | David Zucchino
Sometimes the remains of American war dead arrive at the military morgue intact, sealed inside a "human remains pouch" — a body bag. Sometimes they arrive as "dissociated remains" — a leg, an arm or other body parts ripped loose by the force of a roadside bomb or suicide bomber or air crash. And sometimes there are commingled remains of several victims of a blast or crash, including service members, civilian bystanders and, in some cases, a suicide bomber. Air Force Lt. Col. Laura Regan literally lays hands on remains of the dead.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 4, 1989
The Times is to be commended for publishing two very touching articles concerning AIDS and its impact on two families who never thought they'd be impacted by this hideous disease. However, both stories carried a thinly veiled tone that these were somehow "innocent" families who had not been involved in high-risk activities, so their infection is that much worse. Statements such as these indirectly convey the message that some people are "less innocent" than others. A virus does not discriminate.
OPINION
March 9, 1986
Family is a sacred word to people in the Reagan Administration. For them, it means two parents and self-sufficiency. For many poor households, family means something less. White House officials say that they want to change that, but one idea under study, a ceiling on federal benefits, could punish the sickest and most vulnerable American families. It could force hard choices between food, shelter, medical care and other necessities.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|