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NATIONAL
July 20, 2012 | By Jenny Deam
AURORA, Colo. - As afternoon turned to evening Friday, dozens of family members gathered at Gateway High School in Aurora waiting to hear the fate of those still not accounted for. Clergy and grief counselors also gathered at the high school, about a mile from the movie complex where a gunman killed 12 and wounded dozens of others. “We are still waiting to hear from the coroner's office,” said a grim-faced Pastor Milton Thomas. Authorities interviewed witnesses at the high school, which also served as a clearing house for information - such as it was - for relatives worried about loved ones.
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NEWS
April 4, 1989 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, Times Staff Writer
From her majestic hilltop mansion overlooking Lake Victoria, Meena Madhvani has seen enough of the ups and downs of Ugandan life to justify her speaking with a certain tartness. In her time, she has entertained such luminaries as Indira Gandhi. Idi Amin proposed to her and, it is said, infuriated at being rebuffed, expelled tens of thousands of Uganda's Indian citizens. Rebels advancing on Kampala, the capital, camped in her fields of sugar cane.
NEWS
October 9, 2013 | By Mary MacVean
Scientists have discovered two gene mutations that they believe are associated with an increased risk of eating disorders. Anorexia nervosa and bulimia often run in families, but these eating disorders are complex, and it has proved difficult  to identify the paths. But, using two families with very high incidences of eating disorders, scientists say they found rare mutations, one in each family, that were associated with the people who had the disorders. The study suggests that mutations that decrease the activity of a protein that turns on the expression of other genes - called a transcription factor - increase the risk.
NEWS
January 17, 1997 | GREG BRAXTON and SHAWN HUBLER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
To the extent that the world knew Ennis Cosby, it was as a shining star of his father's hilarious imaginary life. He was the sly adolescent whose first words upon turning 16 were, allegedly: "Wanna Porsche." He was the kid who shaved his head for no reason and attacked his sisters with wet towels. He was Theo Huxtable, the TV son on "The Cosby Show," whose relationship with his father redefined, with long-overdue dignity, the entertainment industry's portrayal of African American families.
NEWS
November 8, 2011 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
It will be an even 20 for Michelle and Jim Bob Duggar, who announced Tuesday that they're expecting their 20th child. The Duggars, stars of their own TLC show, are a source of fascination for some people, since super-sized families aren't the norm the way they were about a century ago. Michelle Duggar, you'll recall, didn't have such an easy time around with her last pregnancy in 2009. Daughter Josie was delivered early when it was discovered that Michelle had preeclampsia and gall bladder problems (Josie is now doing fine)
TRAVEL
November 25, 2012 | By Jen Leo
The family-travel website that moms and dads didn't even know they wanted - let alone needed. Name: Minitime.com What it does: Introduces kid-friendly destinations - along with kid-friendly hotels - in the United States, Canada, Caribbean and Mexico. What's hot: What slingshots this new family travel website to the head of the line is that its travel suggestions are based on the age of your kids. Just punch in the ages (up to three should cover the range) and check out its destination and hotel suggestions, accompanied by photos from real families.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 18, 2010 | By Alan Zarembo
Families with autistic children in eastern Los Angeles County have filed a class-action lawsuit against the nonprofit agency that provides them with state-funded services, alleging that it had illegally discontinued their therapy for the disorder. The agency, the Eastern Los Angeles County Regional Center, informed more than 100 families late last summer that their children were losing the therapy -- known as the DIR model, or "developmental, individual difference, relationship-based" -- as a result of state budget cuts.
NATIONAL
January 12, 2010 | Mcclatchy Newspapers
The United States has more poor children now than it did a year ago. As more families are hammered by the recession, more are using food stamps to feed their kids, according to a study by the Brookings Institution and First Focus, a bipartisan child advocacy group. "They are a really good barometer, a kind of economic-needs test," said Mark R. Rank, an expert on social welfare programs at Washington University in St. Louis. "If you're receiving food stamps and you're a child, by definition, you're in poverty."
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