Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsFamily Farm
IN THE NEWS

Family Farm

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
October 9, 1987 | LYNNE HEFFLEY
A sensitive adaptation of Katherine Anne Porter's short story "The Fig Tree" marks the fourth-season premiere of "Wonderworks" Saturday on PBS (airing at 7 p.m. on Channel 50, 8 p.m. on Channels 28 and 15). Performed by a first-rate cast, Porter's child's-eye view of death takes a young girl out of her shadowy world of repressed grief into sunlight and survival. A Texas family of 1903 has been crippled several years before by the loss of the mother in childbirth.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 8, 2014 | By Steve Chawkins
Though he lived in a region known worldwide for hyper-enthusiastic, round-the-clock innovating, Walter Cottle Lester wasn't a big fan of change. As Silicon Valley's subdivisions and office buildings surged around the farm his family had started more than a century before, he refused to sell. Reclusive and soft-spoken, he turned down potential earnings as high as $500 million. Instead, he arranged to donate his spread, the last big farm in the city of San Jose and one of the last in the sprawling Silicon Valley, for public use as a historic park.
Advertisement
NEWS
June 6, 2012 | By Mary Forgione, Los Angeles Times Daily Travel & Deal blogger
Ready for something different on your family vacation this summer? Feather Down Farms offers authentic farm stays where kids and adults can learn about farm life (yes, there are chores to do) while tent-camping at sites in Illinois, New York and Northern California. In California, Chaffin Family Orchards in the Sacramento Valley will begin accepting guests in mid-August. The farm raises grass-fed cows, lamb and goats. Its orchards produce olives, oranges, lemons, cherries, plums, figs and other produce year round - fresh fruits that guests may eat. During the stay, family members can tour fields and gardens, get up to milk the cows, learn to prepare and cook meals on an open-fire stove and even take a dip in a private mountain lake.
FOOD
January 23, 2014 | By David Karp
The revamped Glendale farmers market launched Jan. 9 in a new location with an expanded and upgraded roster. Founded in 1992, it was formerly on Brand Boulevard, sponsored by the city, and managed by Christopher Nyerges, who also operates a School of Self-Reliance that teaches wilderness survival skills. Last year, the Downtown Glendale Assn. , a merchants and property owners group, took over the market, and this month hired a new manager, Carole Gallegos, who directs the successful Encino and South Pasadena farmers markets.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 23, 2000
Re "Local Agriculture Faces Challenge of World Change," July 9. When big business / big government makes decisions for profit, there is what they might call "acceptable loss." Included in the loss are small businesses, such as the family farm, which has been a core of America's vitality and greatness. As an example of the economic sting of global market decisions on local family farmers, Richard Pidduck, past president of the Ventura County Farm Bureau, cites the importation of lemons into our area from South America.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 15, 2010 | By Jack Dolan, Los Angeles Times
First in a series of candidate profiles Early on a winter morning in 2007, a 25-year old Mexican farmhand was crushed beneath a tractor on Lt. Gov. Abel Maldonado's family farm, sparking an investigation that resulted in citations for four workplace safety violations, including failure to have a spotter direct the tractor driver and failure to have someone on the scene with first-aid certification. Although the young employee's death was an isolated tragedy, the run-in with regulators was part of a pattern for Agro-Jal Farming Enterprises, the farm in Santa Maria that pays Maldonado a six-figure salary to serve as controller.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 3, 2002 | Megan Boldt, Associated Press
STRASBURG, N.D. -- It has been decades since anyone has lived on the small farmstead that made this small North Dakota farming community famous. But listen carefully. As visitors drive up from the gravel road, they can hear the "champagne music" flowing freely from the barn where Lawrence Welk used to play his accordion. "His sisters would get so sick of him playing that thing that they would send him out to the barn," said Welk's niece, Edna Schwab.
BUSINESS
September 20, 2013 | By Michael Hiltzik
Let's visit again with Rep. Doug LaMalfa, R-Richvale, who distinguished himself a few months back by making it into Rep. George Miller's Hall of Hypocrites by pocketing millions in farm subsidies for his family farm while acting to slash food stamp benefits for the poor. This week, the House of Representatives voted again on food stamps. LaMalfa voted with the Republican majority to cut $40 billion from the program overĀ 10 years. That would be devastating, if the Senate concurred.
BUSINESS
July 10, 1988 | JIM ABRAMS, Associated Press
Wu Fengqi remembers living on a people's farm commune and being so poor he had neither a table to eat from nor a bed to sleep on. Today he has his own family farm, and he's rich by Chinese standards. Thus it is that the 50-year-old Wu scoffs at the idea being tossed around in Beijing, China's capital, that tiny family farms in some areas should gradually give way to more efficient, large-scale cooperative ventures. "The peasants won't support group farming," he said. "They would resist."
NEWS
September 24, 1990 | JOHN J. GOLDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The corn swaying in the prematurely chill breeze stood as high as an elephant's eye. But the nearby red brick houses and public school stood even higher. It's harvest time on the last remaining working family farm in New York City. The carrots are being pulled from the rich dark soil. Radishes and dill, beets and turnips, parsley, scallions and other crops are being picked, cleaned and sold.
FOOD
October 25, 2013 | David Karp
The 19-year-old Encino farmers market is one of the two best in the San Fernando Valley, because of its large size and quality, and its preponderance of farmers over prepared food. It's on a par with Studio City, which the manager, Carole Gallegos, ran until 2011, but it's in a pleasanter location, in a park, with better parking. The market's earnings go to ONEgeneration , a respected nonprofit that provides care to seniors and children. One recent addition is award-winning Nuvo olive oil , from century-old trees in Oroville, in the Sacramento Valley.
BUSINESS
September 20, 2013 | By Michael Hiltzik
Let's visit again with Rep. Doug LaMalfa, R-Richvale, who distinguished himself a few months back by making it into Rep. George Miller's Hall of Hypocrites by pocketing millions in farm subsidies for his family farm while acting to slash food stamp benefits for the poor. This week, the House of Representatives voted again on food stamps. LaMalfa voted with the Republican majority to cut $40 billion from the program overĀ 10 years. That would be devastating, if the Senate concurred.
BUSINESS
August 23, 2013 | By David Pierson
The gig: Alex Weiser, 49, of Weiser Family Farms grows some of the Southland's most sought-after fruits and vegetables on three farms in Kern and San Bernardino counties. Weiser potatoes can be found on the vaunted Providence restaurant menu in Hollywood. His melons are picked ripe and sold at Whole Foods Markets. You can find him every Wednesday and Saturday at the Santa Monica Farmers Market. Family business : Weiser is co-owner of a family operation started by his father, Sid Weiser.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 3, 2013 | By Steve Chawkins, Los Angeles Times
The Aztecs gave us guacamole, but it was Gil Henry who gave us avocados that don't have to sit on the kitchen counter for weeks to become dip-worthy. Until the early 1980s, avocados were green, rock-hard objects that could take many days to ripen once shoppers brought them home. But then Henry pioneered a "ripening room" on his family's avocado farm in Escondido that sped up the process, allowing supermarkets to sell avocados that are ready to eat or close to it. The method has since become the industry standard.
TRAVEL
June 2, 2013 | By April Orcutt
PETALUMA, Calif. - As you drive north of San Francisco into Marin and Sonoma counties, the countryside begins to unfold before you. Green pastures, oak and chaparral-covered hillsides and small canyons of redwood trees reveal themselves. Red-tailed hawks and osprey fly overhead, deer graze in the hills and at sunset, bobcats survey the terrain. A setting so lovely that you can't help but think cheese Wait - not wine? Perhaps that too, but we're talking here about the Sonoma Marin Cheese Trail that winds through the countryside, connecting family farms and food artisans that create batches of distinctive cheeses from local grass-fed cows, goats and sheep.
NATIONAL
May 24, 2013 | By Matt Pearce
OKLAHOMA CITY -- "Welcome to my home," Olga Cordero said, and walked into her roofless living room. It was Friday morning. When they last saw their home, there had been a pile of dead horses nearby at Orr's Family Farm, victims of Monday's monster tornado. The Cordero family duplex in southern Oklahoma City was hit hard in the twister's fierce winds and then soaked in the rains that followed. Part of the brick siding was ripped away, leaving a shape that looked like the state of Oklahoma, imprinted with plywood like a photo negative.
NEWS
March 4, 1985 | LARRY GREEN, Times Staff Writer
Main Street windows display the signs of trouble in rural America. Notices taped on plate-glass storefronts announce the sales of farms and farm equipment: Two this week, one next week, three the week after. Karen's Cafe is "Closed Until May" the sign says, but people in Verdigre doubt it will ever reopen. The building that housed the only Chevrolet dealer for miles around is empty. The windows reveal a showroom floor littered with paper and one dead sparrow.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 7, 2012 | By Randall Roberts, Los Angeles Times Pop Music Critic
In 1978 on a 1,600-acre farm in rural Washington, Don Emerson Sr., one of a long line of builders, loggers and sawmill workers whose livelihood was earned in the timber surrounding them, noticed that two of his teenage sons, Joe and Donnie, had taken a liking to music. He'd see them doing their chores while listening to radio from Spokane 70 miles to the southeast and encouraged them as they began writing and playing their own music. They even went into a studio to make a record but were disappointed with the experience.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 21, 2013 | By Mark Olsen, Los Angeles Times
Expand or die. This ominous motto of economic imperialism courses throughout the film "At Any Price," set against the imperiled world of modern-day family farming. Director Ramin Bahrani, who co-wrote the screenplay with Hallie Elizabeth Newton, spent six months in Iowa living among farmers as the duo spoke to people about the issues facing their lives and businesses. The film grapples with enduring issues of generational conflict and transition as well as the perennial drama of success and failure in America.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 7, 2012 | By Randall Roberts, Los Angeles Times Pop Music Critic
In 1978 on a 1,600-acre farm in rural Washington, Don Emerson Sr., one of a long line of builders, loggers and sawmill workers whose livelihood was earned in the timber surrounding them, noticed that two of his teenage sons, Joe and Donnie, had taken a liking to music. He'd see them doing their chores while listening to radio from Spokane 70 miles to the southeast and encouraged them as they began writing and playing their own music. They even went into a studio to make a record but were disappointed with the experience.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|