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Family Guy Television Program

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ENTERTAINMENT
March 17, 2007 | From the Associated Press
Carol Burnett filed a $2-million copyright infringement lawsuit against 20th Century Fox, claiming her cleaning woman character was portrayed on the animated series "Family Guy." The U.S. District Court suit filed in L.A. this week said the Fox Broadcasting show didn't have her permission to include her cleaning woman character Charwoman in an April 2006 episode. The episode shows Charwoman as a porno shop maid and it uses what the lawsuit called an "altered version" of Burnett's theme music.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 19, 2009 | Greg Braxton
Alex Borstein of "Family Guy" is standing on the brink of a milestone. Her show could make TV history Sunday by becoming the first animated series to win an Emmy as outstanding comedy. But just a few days before the gala, Borstein, who provides the voice of Lois, the loving wife of oafish lead character Peter Griffin, had another kind of history in mind -- the kind that might earn a citation from TV's fashion police. "I haven't even gotten a dress yet," Borstein confessed. "I may make history by wearing something I've already worn."
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 6, 2007 | From City News Service
A federal judge tossed out a lawsuit that entertainer Carol Burnett brought against Fox over use of her well-known Charwoman character in an episode of the animated TV series "Family Guy." Burnett alleged in her copyright infringement lawsuit, filed in March, that the show's creators did not have her consent to include the cleaning woman character she created in the late 1950s, while a repertoire player on "The Garry Moore Show," in an April 2006 episode.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 6, 2007 | From City News Service
A federal judge tossed out a lawsuit that entertainer Carol Burnett brought against Fox over use of her well-known Charwoman character in an episode of the animated TV series "Family Guy." Burnett alleged in her copyright infringement lawsuit, filed in March, that the show's creators did not have her consent to include the cleaning woman character she created in the late 1950s, while a repertoire player on "The Garry Moore Show," in an April 2006 episode.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 27, 2004 | Randy Lewis
Fox Television is in a family way again. The company has ordered a minimum of 22 new episodes of the animated series "Family Guy" more than two years after its initial run ended. The move is in response to the series' strengthening afterlife on DVD and in reruns on the Cartoon Network. It's been drawing high ratings on cable since the Cartoon Network began programming it opposite the broadcast networks' late-night talk shows, and it ranked as the top-selling television offering on DVD in 2003.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 19, 2009 | Greg Braxton
Alex Borstein of "Family Guy" is standing on the brink of a milestone. Her show could make TV history Sunday by becoming the first animated series to win an Emmy as outstanding comedy. But just a few days before the gala, Borstein, who provides the voice of Lois, the loving wife of oafish lead character Peter Griffin, had another kind of history in mind -- the kind that might earn a citation from TV's fashion police. "I haven't even gotten a dress yet," Borstein confessed. "I may make history by wearing something I've already worn."
BUSINESS
April 13, 2005 | Meg James, Times Staff Writer
Stewie Griffin is back, and he has DVD sales to thank for it. With his oblong cartoon head, sinister voice and taste for "total world domination," the infant Stewie set the tone for the irreverent animated series "Family Guy," which Fox canceled nearly three years ago because of lagging ratings. After they went off the air, however, Stewie and his bizarre family refused to die. Right away, fans complained.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 29, 2005 | Paul Brownfield, Times Staff Writer
The whole dream of watching television, it seems to me, is that you don't have to do anything but sit there to receive it. So I'm having trouble adapting to this trend of watching TV on DVD, which feels too close to buying a cabinet at IKEA and knowing that some kind of assembly will be required. Watching TV is supposed to promote a certain robust laziness.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 17, 2007 | From the Associated Press
Carol Burnett filed a $2-million copyright infringement lawsuit against 20th Century Fox, claiming her cleaning woman character was portrayed on the animated series "Family Guy." The U.S. District Court suit filed in L.A. this week said the Fox Broadcasting show didn't have her permission to include her cleaning woman character Charwoman in an April 2006 episode. The episode shows Charwoman as a porno shop maid and it uses what the lawsuit called an "altered version" of Burnett's theme music.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 29, 2005 | Paul Brownfield, Times Staff Writer
The whole dream of watching television, it seems to me, is that you don't have to do anything but sit there to receive it. So I'm having trouble adapting to this trend of watching TV on DVD, which feels too close to buying a cabinet at IKEA and knowing that some kind of assembly will be required. Watching TV is supposed to promote a certain robust laziness.
BUSINESS
April 13, 2005 | Meg James, Times Staff Writer
Stewie Griffin is back, and he has DVD sales to thank for it. With his oblong cartoon head, sinister voice and taste for "total world domination," the infant Stewie set the tone for the irreverent animated series "Family Guy," which Fox canceled nearly three years ago because of lagging ratings. After they went off the air, however, Stewie and his bizarre family refused to die. Right away, fans complained.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 27, 2004 | Randy Lewis
Fox Television is in a family way again. The company has ordered a minimum of 22 new episodes of the animated series "Family Guy" more than two years after its initial run ended. The move is in response to the series' strengthening afterlife on DVD and in reruns on the Cartoon Network. It's been drawing high ratings on cable since the Cartoon Network began programming it opposite the broadcast networks' late-night talk shows, and it ranked as the top-selling television offering on DVD in 2003.
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