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Family History

NEWS
November 2, 1994 | DAWN BONKER
If the task of organizing and transcribing family history interviews is too daunting, you can try an easier, scripted approach with one of several memory books available in bookstores. To ensure they actually get filled in, plan to make an afternoon or evening of it with your relatives. Here are a few to consider: * A series of memory books from HarperCollins, including "Grandfather Remembers" and "Dad Remembers." Includes such good topics as, "My worries about the future were. . . ."
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 21, 2010 | By Lori Kozlowski, Los Angeles Times
Fatima Bhutto wrote her book because she wanted to remember her father. She wanted to remember his silly nicknames, his joke about putting a disco ball in her redecorated bedroom, and how he told her she was too young for lipstick. She wanted the 14 years she had with him to be written down somewhere before she started to forget. It was the last promise she made to him before his death in 1996. "When I think of my father, I never think of him as a politician," she said in a recent phone interview.
HEALTH
June 1, 1998 | USHA LEE McFARLING
These recommendations are based on guidelines from the American Urological Assn., the American Heart Assn., the American Cancer Society and the American Diabetes Assn. (For personal advice, talk to your doctor.) * Physical Exam: A simple screening by a primary physician should be conducted every two years until a man turns 40 or 45, and then annually. * Prostate Cancer: a rectal exam and PSA (prostate-specific antigen) blood test each year after the age of 50.
NEWS
April 28, 1990 | MARILYN PITTS, Marilyn Pitts is a free-lancer writer based in Santa Ana.
Nearly 400 years ago, Pedro Robledo left Mexico with the Juan de Ornate expedition, venturing into what is now New Mexico, to become one of the first settlers in that region. Today, his 13th-great-granddaughter, Pauline Chavez Bent, a genealogist who specializes in Latino history, travels uncharted terrain of a different nature, searching back through time to meticulously piece together her family's history.
NEWS
February 17, 2011 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
KCBS-TV Channel 2 reporter Serene Branson suffered "migraine aura" when she began speaking what appeared to be gibberish during a live report following the Grammys on Sunday evening, Dr. Andrew Charles, director of UCLA’s Headache Research and Treatment Program, said in an interview Thursday. Some previous reports had indicated she was suffering from "complicated migraine" or "complex migraine. " Those are really laymen's terms that have fallen out of favor with physicians, Charles said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 29, 2004 | Stephanie Chavez, Times Staff Writer
Toni Scott packed the remnants of her family history into a plastic grocery bag -- dozens of tattered and sepia-toned photographs of mostly strangers, passed on to her by her deceased grandmother. With care, she pulled her baby book out of the bag and gently opened the brittle pages to show off her family tree. "Except for the name of his mother, my father's side of the tree is empty," said the 58-year-old Los Angeles special education teacher.
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