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NEWS
June 26, 1999 | From Associated Press
A man who claimed he was sleepwalking when he stabbed his wife 44 times and held her head under water was convicted Friday of first-degree murder. Scott Falater, 43, stared straight ahead and did not react as the verdict was read in a Maricopa County Superior Court. He then hugged his stepfather and kissed his mother on the cheek. "It's not over yet," Falater said just before he left the courtroom.
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HEALTH
June 1, 1998 | USHA LEE McFARLING
These recommendations are based on guidelines from the American Urological Assn., the American Heart Assn., the American Cancer Society and the American Diabetes Assn. (For personal advice, talk to your doctor.) * Physical Exam: A simple screening by a primary physician should be conducted every two years until a man turns 40 or 45, and then annually. * Prostate Cancer: a rectal exam and PSA (prostate-specific antigen) blood test each year after the age of 50.
HEALTH
February 16, 2009 | By Myra Neben
A good friend of mine was approaching her 49th birthday with trepidation. Why, I asked her, was she so afraid of 49? "My mother died at 49 of a heart attack. The same thing will probably happen to me," she said. Not likely, I replied. And we started to talk about her mother. Her mother was a child of the age before genetics, before cholesterol, before we knew the dangers of smoking, fat and salt. Her mother and her mother's mother cooked with bacon grease, lard and other ingredients that many of us eschew today.
NEWS
April 28, 1990 | MARILYN PITTS, Marilyn Pitts is a free-lancer writer based in Santa Ana.
Nearly 400 years ago, Pedro Robledo left Mexico with the Juan de Ornate expedition, venturing into what is now New Mexico, to become one of the first settlers in that region. Today, his 13th-great-granddaughter, Pauline Chavez Bent, a genealogist who specializes in Latino history, travels uncharted terrain of a different nature, searching back through time to meticulously piece together her family's history.
NATIONAL
December 9, 2005 | Jonathan Bor, Baltimore Sun
Most pregnant women have little trouble kicking caffeine once their doctors warn them that the common stimulant found in coffee, tea, cola, chocolate and other foods could endanger their babies' health. But researchers have found a group that does have trouble: women with a family history of alcohol abuse. "It's not just an academic issue," said Dr. Roland R.
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