Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsFamily Planning
IN THE NEWS

Family Planning

NEWS
November 13, 1998 | From Reuters
The Packard Foundation announced Thursday that it is giving $375 million to family planning programs in developing countries, the largest private donation ever given to promote birth control. With the global population nearing 6 billion, foundation directors said there is a critical need to improve family planning and reproductive health services. "We have an urgent, unmet need for quality family planning in developing countries, where 80% of people live," Executive Director Cole Wilbur said.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 16, 1989 | GERALD FARIS, Times Staff Writer
Three South Bay public clinics are decrying the two-thirds' cut in state family planning funds made this month by Gov. George Deukmejian that threaten to cripple their services. They hope legislators who support family planning will restore some of the money and stave off cuts in programs that primarily serve poor and low-income women. "One-third of what we do is family planning, and losing this money would be devastating," said Alan Terwey, clinic manager of the Harbor Free Clinic in San Pedro.
NEWS
December 25, 1985 | Associated Press
The Indian government has urged state officials to improve family planning programs to check population growth in the world's second most populous country. "We cannot wait for the development process to bring about control of population," Health Minister Mohsina Kidwai told state health ministers and secretaries in the capital Monday. A text of her remarks was released Tuesday. "Population has been and continues to be our most serious problem," she said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 30, 1990
County Supervisor Harriett M. Wieder urged support of a state bill Monday that would restore most of a recent, $24-million cut in state assistance to family planning centers. Wieder told a crowd of about 100 people at Leisure World that "you are going to be missionaries" to help pass AB 99, an effort to restore $20 million to the family planning budget. "You are going to be the squeaky wheel that gets the attention of legislators." Gov. George Deukmejian's proposed budget unveiled Jan.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 24, 1989 | GERALD FARIS, Times Staff Writer
South Bay family planning clinics are adapting to sharp cuts in state funding after an attempted legislative compromise failed to restore their state money. The clinics, which typically serve poor women who receive little medical care elsewhere, are continuing to function with curtailed budgets and, in some cases, reduced services.
NEWS
August 3, 1995 | JANET HOOK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a surprising defeat for anti-abortion forces and their allies in the Republican leadership, the House on Wednesday rejected a proposal to abolish the federal government's principal family planning program and transfer the money to state block grants. The program, which provides grants to clinics around the country, survived on a 221-207 vote, with 53 Republicans joining 167 Democrats and one independent in the majority.
NEWS
February 6, 1987 | Associated Press
Health and Human Services Secretary Otis R. Bowen declined Thursday to reinstate a subordinate's order denying federal funds to Planned Parenthood family planning programs because the organization also operates abortion clinics.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 5, 1985 | LYNN O'SHAUGHNESSY, Times Staff Writer
Family planning services for about 16,000 low-income women in the San Fernando Valley have been jeopardized by Gov. George Deukmejian's refusal to delete anti-abortion language inserted into the state budget by a clerical error. The governor's action casts into limbo $32 million in state family-planning money that was earmarked for 234 public and private agencies providing family planning services throughout the state.
NEWS
February 1, 1990 | GEORGE SKELTON, TIMES SACRAMENTO BUREAU CHIEF
Bowing to pressure from fellow Republicans, Gov. George Deukmejian on Wednesday allowed a $20-million family planning bill to become law without his signature, thus avoiding a veto override attempt and dousing a smoldering political issue.
NEWS
September 14, 1987 | DON IRWIN, Times Staff Writer
Despite two decades of efforts to bring family planning to the Third World, there are serious shortages in services available in 82 developing nations, according to a 110-nation study made public Sunday by the Population Crisis Committee. Declines in family size correspond closely with the quality of available services, the committee said in a summary of its study, which will be published in full next month under the title "Access to Birth Control: A World Assessment."
Los Angeles Times Articles
|