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Famine

WORLD
March 22, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
The United Nations appealed for nearly $327 million in aid to help starving people in southern Somalia, which is suffering its worst drought in a decade. About 2.1 million people face severe food shortages caused by prolonged drought, war, displacement, flooding and human rights abuses, said the U.N. Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs. More than 11.5 million people will need food assistance in the next six months, the U.N. said.
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WORLD
January 7, 2006 | From Associated Press
An estimated 11 million people in the Horn of Africa "are on the brink of starvation" because of severe drought and war, with at least 30 deaths already reported in Kenya, the United Nations said Friday. People in Somalia, Kenya, Djibouti and Ethiopia need food, water, livestock and seeds, the Rome-based Food and Agriculture Organization said in a statement.
WORLD
January 2, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
Thousands of inmates in Kenya skipped lunch to send food to countrymen affected by drought, prison officials said. Most of Kenya's estimated 50,000 prisoners gave up their ration of beans and corn porridge on the day President Mwai Kibaki declared a national disaster and said about 2.5 million Kenyans would need famine relief in the next six months.
WORLD
December 31, 2005 | From Associated Press
Drought has triggered extreme food shortages in three East African countries, putting millions of people at risk of famine as the lean dry season approaches, a humanitarian group said Friday. Pre-famine conditions have already emerged in eastern Ethiopia, including escalating malnutrition, reports of child deaths, and human and livestock migration, the U.S.-funded Famine Early Warning Systems Network said.
WORLD
August 7, 2005 | Robyn Dixon, Times Staff Writer
The rainy season brings a breathtaking verdant beauty to Sakina Idi's village in southern Niger, but it also fills her heart with a cold dread. Last year, one of her children, a 2-year-old girl, died in the wet season. The year before, another child died. The year before that, two of her children died during the rains, a month apart.
WORLD
August 5, 2005 | Robyn Dixon, Times Staff Writer
The frail baby boy she cradles has arms no thicker than her finger. His belly has hollowed and his skin has sagged as his weight has dropped. Rakiya Nassirou weeps constantly over her son, wondering what is happening to him and whether God is angry with her. But 6-month-old Rabiou is not her only worry. Another boy, 3-year-old Moussa, is with her at this feeding station run by Doctors Without Borders.
WORLD
July 4, 2005 | By Barbara Demick, Times Staff Writer
For most of her life, Kim Hui Suk had spouted the sayings of North Korea's founder Kim Il Sung and never for a moment harbored a doubt: Capitalists were the enemy. Individualism was evil. But then disaster rained down on her hometown, Chongjin, on North Korea's remote east coast. Factories ran out of fuel. Food rations stopped. Watching her family slowly succumb to the famine — her mother-in-law, husband and son eventually would die of starvation — Kim realized she had to change.
WORLD
July 3, 2005 | Vanora Bennett
The face of 3-year-old Birhan Woldu as she was near death, shown in a film about Ethiopian famine during the Live Aid concert in 1985, provided one of that event's most jolting images. Her appearance onstage Saturday with Live 8 organizer Bob Geldof, who also organized the rock benefit 20 years ago, provided one of the most inspiring images of Live Aid's successor. She was wrapped in a burial shroud when a Canadian cameraman took the shot used in the Live Aid documentary.
WORLD
July 3, 2005 | Barbara Demick, Times Staff Writer
His day begins at 4:30 a.m. The 64-year-old retired math teacher doesn't own a clock or even a watch, but the internal alarm that has kept him alive while so many of his fellow North Koreans have starved to death tells him he had better get out to pick grass if his family is to survive. Soon the streets of his city, Chongjin, will be swarming with others doing the same. Some cook the grass to eat. The teacher feeds it to the rabbits his family sells at the market. At 10 a.m.
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