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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 27, 1994 | MAKI BECKER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A bell clanging at 8 a.m. marked the official opening Sunday of the ONE Farmers' Market in Van Nuys, where farmers offered up a cornucopia of fresh produce in a sale that also benefited a local senior citizens' group. San Fernando Valley residents lined up at the gate to be among the first of a crowd of thousands to browse over strawberries, peaches, sunflowers, honey and quilts hand-stitched by seniors at the Organization for the Needs of the Elderly.
ARTICLES BY DATE
FOOD
April 18, 2014 | By Russ Parsons
There's no way around it. In most cases, eating sustainably is probably going to be more expensive and less convenient than simply running down the street to your neighborhood grocery. But if you're interested in where your food comes from and how it gets from the field to your kitchen, here are some Southern California organizations that are making it easier to cook responsibly. Community Seafood: Though Southern California no longer has the thriving commercial fishing community it once did, three women, Sarah Rathbone, Kim Selkoe and Courtney Dietz, are working to connect 40 to 50 of the remaining local fishermen with home cooks in Santa Barbara and Los Angeles.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 8, 1994 | MAKI BECKER
Farm-fresh vegetables and fruits as well as arts and crafts products made by senior citizens will be available at a new farmers' market, scheduled to begin June 26 in Van Nuys. Audrey Phillips, director of community relations and volunteerism at the Organization for the Needs of the Elderly (ONE), is the mastermind behind the farmers' market, which is intended to raise funds for the organization.
FOOD
April 11, 2014 | By David Karp
DOS PALOS, Calif. - Bagged rice may look like a mundane commodity, a bit incongruous at a local farmers market. But one taste of the variety grown by Koda Farms - with attractive, uniform kernels, alluring fragrance, soft texture and a rich, sweet flavor - makes clear that rice can be a delicacy well worth pursuing. "Their brown rice is different from what is produced in Japan, but has its own unique, nutty flavor," said Sonoko Sakai, a locally based cooking teacher who frequently travels to Japan and represents traditional Japanese rice growers in the United States.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 6, 1999 | KAREN ROBINSON-JACOBS
Ah, the bounties of nature to be found at the local farmers market: decorative items made of handblown glass, pony rides and, of course, an espresso bar (I mean, this is L.A. after all). At the Northridge Fashion Center's Farmers' Market & Family Festival, the newest addition to a centuries-old tradition of outdoor produce markets, the offerings go beyond berries and bok choy.
BUSINESS
May 7, 2000 | MELINDA FULMER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The kid in the huge booth at the Torrance Farmers Market, with his spiky bleached hair, baggy shorts and an Abercrombie & Fitch T-shirt, hardly looks the part of a new wave of agricultural entrepreneurs. But Shaun Rosendahl, whose sunburned face belies his 21 years, will sell more than $10,000 worth of apples, strawberries, cherries and other fruit on this day in Torrance, at just one of the 44 booths at farmers markets he manages this time of year from his Hermosa Beach apartment.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 4, 1993 | Complied by Times researcher CATHERINE GOTTLIEB
A family of four shopping at inner-city stores spends nearly $300 more each year to buy food than a family of four shopping in suburban areas, according to price comparisons made in a recent UCLA study. Farmers' markets sell food in 25 neighborhoods throughout Los Angeles at prices often as much as 20% to 30% cheaper than local supermarkets; several of these markets serve low-income areas and accept food stamps.
FOOD
November 21, 1991 | ROSALIND CREASY
This time of year, supermarkets overflow with colorful peppers and squashes, piles of cabbages and tomatoes, and bins of potatoes and onions. But these cornucopian displays do not tell the whole story, for there is a hidden feast few supermarket shoppers ever experience--a feast of fruits and vegetables available only to privileged heirloom gardeners, shoppers at farmers markets and a handful of savvy cooks.
FOOD
September 29, 2012 | By David Karp
With dark blue, astringent skins, and dry, sour flesh, the ancient plums called damsons aren't good for eating fresh. When submitted to a process akin to alchemy, however, their tartness and spiciness are ideal for making preserves. Cooked down, the damson's astringency disappears, and its tannic skin imparts a gorgeous magenta color and rich, spicy flavor, while its abundant pectin confers a lusciously thick and smooth consistency. Originating in western Asia (supposedly near Damascus, whence its name)
FOOD
October 12, 2012 | By David Karp
REEDLEY, Calif. -- Raisins are the neglected icon of California agriculture, perceived as an old-fashioned industrial commodity, devoid of seasonal sizzle. At farmers markets, however, it's well worth searching out special varieties, freshly harvested and processed by small growers. One of the top grape vendors at local farmers markets, Linda and Brian Raphael of Apkarian Family Farm, produce high-quality raisins in small quantities, and they show up personally to sell them. On Monday, in anticipation of rain, they were pulling in the last of their trays from the drying yard in Reedley, in Fresno County, where almost three-quarters of the state's raisin crop is produced.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 2014 | By Brittany Levine
A former Glendale councilman who pleaded guilty to embezzlement, perjury and filing false tax returns related to the loss of at least $304,000 from a local farmers market was sentenced Monday to one year in jail. John Drayman shook his head as he was handcuffed in a downtown Los Angeles courtroom, where Superior Court Judge Stephen Marcus called him a "disgraced" ex-mayor who had shown no remorse. "In common parlance, you're a crook," the judge said. After pleading guilty to the felony charges last month, Drayman was ordered to pay about $305,000 in restitution for losses tied to the Montrose farmers market.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 12, 2014 | By Brittany Levine
Former Glendale City Councilman John Drayman is set to spend a year behind bars and pay roughly $305,000 in restitution after pleading guilty to three felonies related to embezzling from a local farmers market. He also agreed to pay about $14,000 in restitution to the California Franchise Tax Board. He is scheduled to return to Los Angeles County Superior Court on April 7 and will likely serve his sentence in County Jail. He will also be given five years' probation. In September, Judge Stephen Marcus rejected Drayman's proposition that included 300 hours of community service and restitution, but no time behind bars.
BUSINESS
February 23, 2014 | By Marc Lifsher
SACRAMENTO - California farmers markets want to get tough with interlopers who don't sell what they grow. They're backing a bill to crack down on vendors who falsely claim to offer pesticide-free or locally grown fruits, nuts and vegetables. "Californians are fortunate to have the highest concentration of farmers markets in the nation," said the bill's author, Assemblyman Roger Dickinson (D-Sacramento). The bill, AB 1871, he said, would "increase consumer protections and accountability at our certified farmers markets, protect local farmers and help this growing sector of the economy continue to thrive.
OPINION
February 21, 2014
Re "Produce trucks feed a need," Column One, Feb. 19 Produce trucks traversing neighborhoods, providing fresh produce and other items: great idea. But readers should know that bringing food to neighborhoods was once common in Los Angeles. I lived in the Los Feliz district, and these trucks went all over the city. Before supermarkets and big-box stores, trucks had regular neighborhood routes and brought a variety of food. There must be some folks who recall deliveries of dairy items from Adohr Farms and bread and sweets from Helms Bakery.
FOOD
January 23, 2014 | By David Karp
The revamped Glendale farmers market launched Jan. 9 in a new location with an expanded and upgraded roster. Founded in 1992, it was formerly on Brand Boulevard, sponsored by the city, and managed by Christopher Nyerges, who also operates a School of Self-Reliance that teaches wilderness survival skills. Last year, the Downtown Glendale Assn. , a merchants and property owners group, took over the market, and this month hired a new manager, Carole Gallegos, who directs the successful Encino and South Pasadena farmers markets.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 26, 2013 | By David Karp
On a recent Saturday morning, Ed Williams stood off to the side at Santa Monica's downtown farmers market, scrutinizing a bright red mango like a detective trying to solve a mystery. "It looks damaged by hot water treatment, which is only used on imported mangoes," Williams said to market supervisor Laura Avery. Pointing to tiny white specks on the fruit, he added, "I think these are dead scale insects. " Williams is deputy director of the Los Angeles County agricultural commissioner's office.
FOOD
November 2, 2012 | By David Karp
When the Stokes Purple sweet potato shows up in markets next week, it's hard to say what will be more intriguing: its look, with dramatically deep purple skin and flesh, its flavor or the mystery of its origins. It was discovered in the United States by Mike Sizemore, 61, who grew up on a farm in North Carolina, the nation's largest sweet potato-producing state. He said in a phone interview, speaking in a delicious Southern drawl, that he worked for 30 years catching car thieves for the state government before retiring in 2003.
FOOD
August 3, 2012 | By David Karp
Among the most lamented casualties of industrial fruit commerce is the Gravenstein apple, whose intense, distinctive aroma, honeyed, floral and fruity, has lodged in the memories of many Californians, emblematic of the careless rapture of childhood. Most plantings in Sonoma, where the variety reaches perfection, have given way to wine grapes and showier, longer-storing and milder-flavored apples, but a few farmers and a Slow Food group have striven to preserve the variety. Still, few Sonoma Gravensteins show up in Southern California, which makes it all the more special that on Aug. 5 and 19, Paul Kolling of Nana Mae's Organics, who tends 75 acres of Gravensteins in Sebastopol, will be selling at the Mar Vista farmers market.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 17, 2013 | By Nita Lelyveld
It's not so common these days to work in the same place for 50 years, but Doris Perez recently celebrated her 50th year at the Original Farmers Market. She works five days a week at Magee's House of Nuts - weekend mornings and Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday afternoons. Stop by sometime to say hello. Perez, 78, started out at the Desert Date Shop on Oct. 23, 1963 - a few short years after arriving from Dublin to be a nanny to two small children. She worked pies at Du-par's for 38 years until it changed hands and closed for a long renovation.
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