Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsFarming
IN THE NEWS

Farming

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 8, 2014 | By Steve Chawkins
Though he lived in a region known worldwide for hyper-enthusiastic, round-the-clock innovating, Walter Cottle Lester wasn't a big fan of change. As Silicon Valley's subdivisions and office buildings surged around the farm his family had started more than a century before, he refused to sell. Reclusive and soft-spoken, he turned down potential earnings as high as $500 million. Instead, he arranged to donate his spread, the last big farm in the city of San Jose and one of the last in the sprawling Silicon Valley, for public use as a historic park.
Advertisement
NEWS
February 7, 2014 | By Kathleen Hennessey
EAST LANSING, Mich. - Keen to not let a rare legislative accomplishment go unnoticed, President Obama jetted to an agricultural research hub in Michigan on Friday to sign into law a long-delayed farm bill and tout the importance of rural America to the economy. In his brief trip to Michigan State University, Obama cited the bill as a victory for his economic agenda and a hopeful sign that he could “break the cycle of short-sighted, crisis-driven, partisan decision-making.” His message, however, was undermined by the release of a weak jobs report as he left for the state Friday morning, as well as the decision by Republican lawmakers to snub the president.
NEWS
February 7, 2014 | By Kathleen Hennessey
WASHINGTON - Careful to not let a rare legislative accomplishment go unnoticed, President Obama will jet to an agricultural research hub in Michigan on Friday to sign into law the long-delayed farm bill and deliver a speech on the importance of rural America to the economy. In his brief trip to Michigan State University in East Lansing, Obama will outline a new administration-wide effort to boost exports from rural America and point to a new report from his economic team on the growth in the agricultural sector.
SPORTS
February 7, 2014 | By Mike DiGiovanna
  Mike Trout did not make it past the first round in this winter's “Face of the Franchise” tournament on MLB Network, losing to Arizona slugger Paul Goldschmidt in the first round. But the Angels star is not lacking for name recognition in the nation's highest political office. In a speech at Michigan State University on Friday, President Obama invoked Trout's name while discussing the farm bill that Congress just passed. The dynamic Trout, a 22-year-old two-way star, was the American League rookie of the year in 2012 and runnerup to Detroit slugger Miguel Cabrera in most valuable player voting in both 2012 and 2013.
NATIONAL
February 7, 2014 | By Kathleen Hennessey
EAST LANSING, Mich. - Keen not to let a rare legislative accomplishment go unnoticed, President Obama jetted to an agricultural research hub here Friday to sign into law a long-delayed farm bill and tout the importance of rural America to the economy. In a brief trip to Michigan State University, Obama cited the bill as a victory for his economic agenda and a hopeful sign he could "break the cycle of short-sighted, crisis-driven, partisan decision-making. " His message, however, was undermined by the release of a weak jobs report and a snub from Republican lawmakers who were invited to the unusual outside-Washington signing ceremony but did not attend.
BUSINESS
February 4, 2014 | By Lisa Mascaro and Michael A. Memoli
WASHINGTON - In a rare display of bipartisanship, Congress gave final approval Tuesday to a nearly $1-trillion farm bill, a hard-fought compromise that sets policy over agricultural subsidies, nutrition programs and the food stamp safety net for the next five years. The Senate approved the measure, 68-32, as a cross-section of farm state senators from both parties fought opposition from budget hawks and some liberals and sent the bill to the White House for President Obama's signature.
NEWS
February 3, 2014 | By Jon Healey
Maybe reforming federal farm subsidies is a task fit for Sisyphus. Every five years or so, when the farm programs come up for reauthorization, fiscal conservatives and good-government types try to make the subsidies look less like corporate welfare and more like an industrial policy designed to preserve the food supply. The former hands out money to agribusinesses regardless of their size or need for help; the latter focuses aid on farmers whose resources are too thin to buffer them from the vicissitudes of weather and crop yields.
NEWS
January 29, 2014 | By Michael A. Memoli
WASHINGTON -- The House of Representatives easily approved a new five-year farm bill Wednesday, ending nearly two years of contentious debate over how to cut agriculture subsidies and nutrition programs. The final vote was 251-166. The Senate is expected to begin considering the compromise bill, which was unveiled Monday by House and Senate negotiators, early next week. The final product averts deep cuts sought by Republicans in the federal food stamp program and ends direct payments to farmers - a controversial provision under the previous farm bill in which farmers received federal subsidies regardless of their output.
NATIONAL
January 27, 2014 | By Richard Simon and Michael A. Memoli
WASHINGTON - California's egg law survived a congressional effort to scramble it as key lawmakers from both parties announced an agreement Monday on a multiyear farm bill. That means beginning next year, all eggs sold in California will have been laid by hens that had plenty of room to flap their wings. The compromise farm bill, which could come up for a House vote Wednesday, would avert deep cuts sought by Republicans in the federal food stamp program and end direct payments to farmers - a controversial provision under the previous farm bill in which farmers received federal subsidies regardless of their output.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|