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Fashion Accessories

NEWS
September 29, 1994 | ROSE-MARIE TURK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Most people keep a discreet, reverent distance from art. But Pascal, Pal Kepenyes and Mercedes Lasarte--three international artists currently exhibiting in Los Angeles--want to draw collectors closer. They beckon with art to wear--similar, less costly versions of sculptures and paintings in museums and private collections around the world.
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NEWS
March 11, 1988 | MARY ROURKE, Times Staff Writer
When boxer shorts are street wear and skateboard bags are fashion accessories, it's safe to say men's tastes are changing. And designers from around the world gathered in Los Angeles last weekend to show just how far out men's fashion will go in the months ahead. With more than 2,000 fashion collections to browse through, even the most conservative dressers could rest assured, there's plenty out there to wear. But fashion adventurers are about to cash in.
NEWS
September 28, 1989 | Marci Slade \f7
"On Saturday nights at the L.A. Equestrian Center, I bet at least 20% of the audience is dressed for polo and they don't even know how to ride a horse," muses Ron Volpe, owner of Burbank Pet & Equestrian Supply in Glendale. When the Western look came into style in the '70s, some non-riding clotheshorses were inspired to check out the tack shops for more authentic apparel.
NEWS
September 6, 1991 | MICHAEL QUINTANILLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For almost 12 hours the crowd of 500 stood in a line last week to make the cut. No, they weren't waiting for concert tickets, a club opening or an Arnold Schwarzenegger movie. They were hot to tick-tock. The folks who gathered at the Irvine Ranch Farmers Market in the Beverly Center--and at other locations across the United States--were scrambling to get their wrists wrapped with $100 limited-edition plastic watches called Swatchetables.
NEWS
January 31, 1992 | KATHRYN BOLD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Buy a T-shirt or a bracelet these days, and you might be helping to save the rain forest, find a cure for AIDS or protect an endangered species. Call it politically correct style. A growing number of clothing and accessory designers are using their talents to help causes ranging from the environment to animal rights.
NEWS
November 1, 1991 | CINDY LaFAVRE YORKS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Not all fashion purchases are dictated by budget and style. The special clothing needs of people with disabilities and the elderly require far more thought. There are 43 million disabled Americans, according to the Washington, D.C.-based National Council on Disability. And 17 million women suffer from rheumatoid arthritis or osteoarthritis, according to the Arthritis Foundation in Atlanta.
NEWS
May 2, 1990 | MAUREEN SAJBEL
The way real women dress and the way models dress for fashion magazines is often in vivid contrast. Real wardrobes are shaped by budgets, career necessities and the limitations of time. Even women who enjoy shopping and wearing pretty clothes don't try to keep up with every drop or lift of a hemline. And they don't buy chartreuse-colored clothes just because a fashion designer says so.
NEWS
April 9, 2002 | JENNIFER MENA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a run-down apartment complex, the head of a tiny nonprofit organization sews messenger bags, slick evening purses and trendy satchels bound for the United States. The products are more than fashion statements. They are a statement about how Mexico should handle its garbage. BIO, a 12-year-old environment advocacy group here, makes the slick and sturdy black bags from inner tubes taken out of damaged truck tires in Mexico City.
NEWS
January 26, 1995 | JOHN MORELL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It's hanging there, almost calling out to you each time you open the closet door to look for something to wear. But there's just something disconcerting about a vest. You try it on with various shirts; you wonder how it would look under a jacket. Is it too dressy? Too individualistic? You stick it back on a hanger till next time. Why do so many men's vests go unworn? For one thing, they're part of the "three-piece suit," that classic '70s ensemble that's as popular now as a pet rock.
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