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Fashion Accessories

NEWS
December 22, 2000 | TRICIA BISHOP, BALTIMORE SUN
Singer and guitarist Lisa Mathews has run the gamut in her personal style, from the extreme ("very high heels and tight dresses") to absolute comfort ("bare feet and flouncy dresses"). The former member of the now-defunct group Love Riot ("Heaven Can Wait") is in the studio working on a compact disc of lullabies (she had a baby girl named Jesse in June) and took a few minutes to tell us about her fashion sense: Question: How would you describe your style?
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NEWS
December 22, 2000 | BOOTH MOORE
Having scored a home run with her baseball-shaped backpacks for the Dodgers, young entrepreneur J.J. Matis, 30, is ready for a new sport, team, and, of course, bag. She has signed with the Lakers to be featured at Staples Center's team shop. Her basketball-shaped backpacks with the Laker logo will debut next month. Matis used some old-fashioned self-promotion to get the attention of Staples Center merchandising manager Alan Fey, wearing her basketball bag to Lakers games all last season.
NEWS
October 18, 2000 | From Hartford Courant
Into making a fashion statement? It can be a snap with the hottest new accessory: rubber-band bracelets, which have been showing up on the wrists of Hollywood celebs, Olympic athletes and trendsetters. The printed, candy-colored wristlets bring outfits attitude with such phrases as "Princess," "I got voted off the island," "Don't harsh my mellow" and "What would Scooby Do?"
NEWS
August 31, 2000 | GREG MORAGO, HARTFORD COURANT
There was a time--a simpler, unencumbered period--when all a guy needed was his trusty wallet. A brown leather thing worn to a dull, satiny finish from years spent snug as a bug in his rear pocket. It held all the essentials: some fivers, a driver's license, a picture of the girl back home and maybe a condom (hey, you never know). Today, that wallet has exploded. A life complicated by the need for gadgets and creature comforts has made the little brown billfold as obsolete as Kookie's comb.
NEWS
August 2, 2000 | CARL SCHOETTLER, BALTIMORE SUN
What do Abraham Lincoln, Stan Laurel, Harry Truman, Frank Sinatra, Karl Marx, Steve Jobs, Winston Churchill, Donald Duck, Mark Twain, Frederick Rasmussen, Manet's "Olympia," Louis Farrakhan and virtually the entire male membership of the Nation of Islam have in common? Well, bow ties, of course. Olympia's admittedly is only a bit of string, but, then again, that's about all she wears except for a bracelet, a pair of bedroom slippers and a hibiscus bloom in her hair.
NEWS
July 14, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Former Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher once described her handbag as the only safe place in Downing Street. But even the baroness was startled to find her little black Ferragamo at the center of a fierce bidding war. Thatcher's leather bag, bought for about $450 in the 1980s, sold for $150,000 in the Breast Cancer Care charity's Internet auction. The bag was purchased by investment specialist Ian Rushbrook of Edinburgh, Scotland.
NEWS
July 2, 2000 | CONNIE KOENENN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Although not everyone remembers it, there was a time when buying a wristwatch meant choosing between a leather band and a metal band. "Accessories used to be just something you stuck in your hair, or a little watch you put on your wrist," said entrepreneur Mary Swan Lewis of Manhattan Beach. She is the president of Chaos Holdings Inc., whose new collection of watches, clocks and sunglasses combines the energy of an MTV-youth culture with iMac-inspired pastel plastics and new technologies.
NEWS
June 28, 2000 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Churchill's cigar and Chamberlain's umbrella were equally famous, but only Margaret Thatcher's trademark purse produced a verb for the English language: To handbag an opponent is to treat him ruthlessly, as the Iron Lady frequently did. Forget that the former Conservative prime minister's handbag often inspired fear. With a little luck it should provide a windfall for a private British charity when it goes on the auction block next week.
NEWS
June 23, 2000
In Ben Franklin's day, elders with failing vision wore ready-made spectacles, primitive magnifying glasses in various strengths to help them read or sew. Now, readers are becoming chic with a momentum made possible only by the sheer numbers of never-say-old baby boomers. Each year from now until 2010, manufacturers expect about 4 million people to turn 40, the magic age when small print grows fuzzy.
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