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Fashion Accessories

NEWS
May 14, 1993
There is such a thing as personality at a price, and hats from the five-and-ten, weekend festivals and trendy junior boutiques can be feisty, flamboyant, funny or frumpy enough to turn heads. Here are a few from around town, priced under $30.
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NEWS
February 28, 1993 | DONNA LARCEN, THE HARTFORD COURANT
Once upon a time, corrective lenses made their own kind of peculiar fashion statement: nerd, owl, egghead, four-eyes. "Now we're in a time where two forces come together: fashion and function," says Carl Zyskowski of Civic Center Opticians in Connecticut. Corrective was the operative word before high-style designers lent their names to frame shapes and technology married old-style etched metal with lightweight tortoise-pattern plastic in almost any shade imaginable.
NEWS
February 26, 1993 | JOHN MORELL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Not many articles of clothing have been used as a way to warm the body and as a bank to hide money, but that's what socks have been. The word's history began with the Greek sukchis, meaning "sole of the foot." The Romans, however, are credited with weaving the first socks as a way to keep the feet of elite soldiers warm on cold-weather campaigns. These goat hair stockings were eventually woven with longer and longer legs until they covered and warmed the thighs.
BUSINESS
February 23, 1993 | KATHY BRYANT, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Sometimes businesses begin almost by accident. So it was with Killer Buttonz, a small company making button covers that snap over existing standard-size buttons. Killer Buttonz's owners, Donna and David Newman, got the idea at an art gallery gift shop, where they saw metal snaps in a variety of designs that fit tightly over buttons and can change the look of a blouse or shirt.
NEWS
February 19, 1993 | PHYLLIS CHACHERE LOWE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Buckle up, men: It's not the law, but it's the look. Belts are more than just a functional accessory in a man's wardrobe. They can pull together an outfit that lacks cohesion, dress up a casual look or dress down a formal one, as well as make a statement. Those conveyor belts include classic, forward, traditional, ethnic, rugged, sporty or Western. Belts have served both utilitarian and distinction purposes throughout history.
NEWS
February 5, 1993 | PHYLLIS CHACHERE LOWE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In the years preceding the French Revolution, Marie Antoinette and her entourage of fashion followers whisked their hair up into grotesque styles featuring miniature tableau and landscapes--a feat accomplished with oodles of wire, crinoline, flour and pomade. Give that stuff the big brush off. A little gel, mousse or spritz, a blow-dryer and the ultimate styling weapon--a hairbrush--is the '90s way to do a 'do.
NEWS
January 3, 1993 | FRANCINE PARNES, ASSOCIATED PRESS
The beret, the hat-hater's hat, is the fashion love of the season. It has been seen on some of the most famous heads around--Kim Basinger, Christie Brinkley, Janet Jackson, Madonna, Demi Moore and Princess Caroline of Monaco--and was a personal favorite of fashion retailers and editors during Seventh Avenue's recent spring previews. "Hats have been out since the 1960s. They sort of disappeared," says Valerie Steele, a professor at the Fashion Institute of Technology in New York.
NEWS
December 18, 1992 | JULIE BAWDEN DAVIS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
If you want to give a man a gift he'll keep close, grow attached to and use just about every day, try a wallet. Few things are more personal or as important to a man as his billfold. Wallets vary, from large credit card receptacles to small trifolds that fit easily in a back pocket. Whatever the style, there are a few things to keep in mind when shopping for a wallet.
NEWS
October 9, 1992 | KATHRYN BOLD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It's easy to spot some who have come directly from the office to a cocktail party or dinner date: They still look as if they should be seated behind a desk. Many people don't have time between the end of the working day and the start of a night on the town to drive home, change clothes and make it to a show or dinner. Still, it is possible to go directly from after-work to after-five in style.
NEWS
July 31, 1992 | ROSE-MARIE TURK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As he flew to Malcolm Forbes' 1989 birthday bash in Morocco, New York interior designer Mario Buatta did what his tailor didn't have time to do. He sewed antique brass buttons on his new Ralph Lauren blazer. For Buatta--and millions of American consumers--buttons count. They are the detail that can turn almost any garment into a gem, miniature sculptures that give signals about the wearer and the designer. What's more, in these tight economic times, buttons have new significance.
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