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June 27, 2010 | By Booth Moore, Los Angeles Times Fashion Critic
Did you know that Halston's famous 1970s era Ultrasuede dresses are not biodegradable? Talk about timeless fashion. Or that Madame Grès was using faux fur way back in 1942, to get around real fur shortages during the German occupation of Paris during World War II? Or that the democratization of fashion didn't begin at Target and H&M, but at New York City's 19th century shirtwaist factories, which produced affordable styles that allowed more women to participate in fashion, but at the cost of fair labor practices?
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NEWS
December 14, 1990 | TERENCE FINAN, UNITED PRESS INTERNATIONAL
Some children may still think elves are behind the production of Christmas toys. But today's toy-maker is more likely to be hunched over a drafting table instead of a work bench, and equipped with an education that includes knowledge in subjects ranging from computer-aided design to psychology. The U.S. toy manufacturing business is not child's play: It employs about 50,000 people at more than 250 companies nationwide.
NEWS
December 14, 1990 | TERENCE FINAN, UNITED PRESS INTERNATIONAL
Some children may still think elves are behind the production of Christmas toys. But today's toy-maker is more likely to be hunched over a drafting table instead of a work bench, and equipped with an education that includes knowledge in subjects ranging from computer-aided design to psychology. The U.S. toy manufacturing business is not child's play: It employs about 50,000 people at more than 250 companies nationwide.
IMAGE
June 27, 2010 | By Booth Moore, Los Angeles Times Fashion Critic
Did you know that Halston's famous 1970s era Ultrasuede dresses are not biodegradable? Talk about timeless fashion. Or that Madame Grès was using faux fur way back in 1942, to get around real fur shortages during the German occupation of Paris during World War II? Or that the democratization of fashion didn't begin at Target and H&M, but at New York City's 19th century shirtwaist factories, which produced affordable styles that allowed more women to participate in fashion, but at the cost of fair labor practices?
NEWS
October 12, 1991
Roger Forsythe, 36, head fashion designer for the Perry Ellis menswear company. Born in Missouri and raised in Texas, Forsythe was educated at the University of Houston and the Fashion Institute of Technology in New York. Asked to join the Ellis group in 1988 as vice president and men's design director, he was credited with turning around company profits, which had sagged since Ellis' death in 1986.
NEWS
May 19, 1998
Alexander W. Lawlor, 68, a leader in the Southern California garment industry. Born in New York City's Bronx, Lawlor graduated from the Fashion Institute of Technology where he studied management, industrial relations and engineering. He moved to California in 1950 and became active in the Men's Apparel Guild in California and served as its president for several years. Lawlor was president of Catalina Martin, a division of Kayser Roth Corp.
NEWS
February 6, 1993
Karl Logan, 43, one of Los Angeles' top fashion designers. A native of Bakersfield, Logan studied fashion design at Los Angeles Trade Technical College and the Fashion Institute of Technology in New York before he rose to prominence among contemporary Los Angeles designers in the mid-1980s. He launched his women's wear collection in 1986 and won the California Designer of the Year Award, presented by the California Mart, in 1988.
NEWS
January 12, 1988 | EILEEN ALT POWELL, Associated Press Writer
India's dress style for hundreds of years has been six yards of fabric wrapped into a sari. It hardly seems the place for a Western fashion design center. But a school that has recently opened in New Delhi intends to make fast-changing haute couture a part of Indian culture. The National Institute of Fashion Technology, founded in collaboration with the Fashion Institute of Technology in New York, launched its first fashion design course in August.
MAGAZINE
January 9, 2000 | Michael T. Jarvis
County sheriffs wear tan and green. The Highway Patrol dons khaki and blue. So why does the Los Angeles Police Department, in a city with a famously balmy climate, run around in stifling dark wool uniforms? "They're not black. They're very, very, very dark blue," says Officer Birgit Aviles with the Los Angeles Police Historical Society. The color is known as "LAPD Navy" at Uniforms Inc. on Olympic Boulevard, where a standard dark wool uniform goes for $160.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 9, 2002
Raven Chanticleer, 72, founder and owner of New York's African American Wax and History Museum, a tiny but impressive space in Harlem filled with two dozen statues of black heroes, died March 31 in New York City of lung cancer. Born James Watson in Woodruff, S.C., the son of sharecroppers, he invented a colorful name and persona for himself as he studied at the Fashion Institute of Technology in New York and became a fashion designer, dancer, sculptor and storyteller.
NEWS
May 16, 1991
Bernard Ozer, the colorful trend spotter of the nation's fashion industry, has died of heart disease at the age of 60. Jody Donahue, a friend and associate, said from New York on Tuesday that Ozer was 60 and died Sunday at Lenox Hill Hospital in Manhattan. Until last month, Ozer was vice president of fashion merchandising and marketing at Associated Merchandising Corp.
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