Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsFast Food Industry Suits
IN THE NEWS

Fast Food Industry Suits

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 5, 2000 | ELISE GEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The family of a toddler who suffocated on a promotional Pokemon toy from Burger King filed a wrongful death lawsuit in Los Angeles on Thursday against the fast-food chain, the toy maker and a safety-testing company. The suit, brought by the child's mother, Jill Ann Alto, seeks unspecified damages for Kira Alexis Murphy's death Dec. 11. Two weeks later and after the near-death of another child in Kansas, Burger King recalled more than 25 million Pokeballs.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 5, 2000 | ELISE GEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The family of a toddler who suffocated on a promotional Pokemon toy from Burger King filed a wrongful death lawsuit in Los Angeles on Thursday against the fast-food chain, the toy maker and a safety-testing company. The suit, brought by the child's mother, Jill Ann Alto, seeks unspecified damages for Kira Alexis Murphy's death Dec. 11. Two weeks later and after the near-death of another child in Kansas, Burger King recalled more than 25 million Pokeballs.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 27, 1998 | DARRELL SATZMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A 30-year-old Antelope Valley man has sued a local McDonald's, alleging he was ridiculed and denied service by an employee because he is gay. The alleged incident took place on the morning of May 23 when Matt Rosenberg went to the restaurant at 2427 Avenue S East in Palmdale with his mother and young niece.
BUSINESS
February 2, 2000 | Associated Press
More than 14,000 Taco Bell workers and former employees in Oregon are facing a March 31 deadline to file claims in a class-action lawsuit about unpaid overtime. A similar lawsuit in Washington state settled in 1997 has resulted in $2.75 million in payments to more than 2,100 current and former workers. Those hired after July 1991 and before August 1997 will be receiving questionnaires to join the class action.
BUSINESS
August 31, 1991 | CHRIS WOODYARD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Eleven El Pollo Loco franchisees have filed a lawsuit against the charbroiled-chicken chain's parent company, alleging that its management has failed to live up to goals for marketing, development of new products and expansion, attorneys said Friday. As a result, 13 of the 49 El Pollo Loco restaurants operated by the disgruntled franchisees have closed, according to the lawsuit filed Wednesday in Orange County Superior Court. The suit seeks at least $90 million in damages. James C.
BUSINESS
February 25, 1998
San Diego-based Foodmaker Inc., owner of the Jack in the Box fast-food chain, said it signed a $58.5-million settlement of lawsuits it filed against suppliers of meat that led to a deadly outbreak of illnesses caused by E. coli bacteria. Foodmaker has agreed to drop suits against Safeway Inc., among others, over meat it contends was tainted and that caused the deaths of four children in 1993.
BUSINESS
February 17, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Foodmaker Settles Poisoning Suit: The San Diego-based parent of the Jack in the Box fast-food chain agreed to pay $1.3 million to the family of a 2-year-old boy who died from eating tainted hamburger. More than 600 cases of E. coli bacterial poisoning were reported in Washington and Nevada during an outbreak that began in late 1992. A Foodmaker spokeswoman said fewer than 20 poisoning lawsuits remain and that "several dozen" cases, including the four involving deaths, have been resolved.
BUSINESS
July 9, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Jack in the Box Owners Sue Parent: Foodmaker Inc., company linked to January's lethal outbreak of food poisoning in the Pacific Northwest, said it is being sued by the owners of 325 Jack in the Boxes. The franchises that filed suit represent more than one-quarter of Foodmaker's Jack in the Box chain. Foodmaker said it will defend itself against the suit. Jack in the Box hamburgers were allegedly responsible for an outbreak of E.
BUSINESS
September 15, 1994 | From Associated Press
A $2.9-million verdict won by a woman who was scalded when she tried to pry the lid off a cup of McDonald's coffee was cut by a judge Wednesday to $640,000. State District Judge Robert Scott ruled that the $2.7 million in punitive damages awarded to 81-year-old Stella Liebeck was excessive, and he reduced the amount to $480,000. He let stand $160,000 in compensatory damages awarded. The judge said he arrived at $480,000 figure for punitive damages by tripling the $160,000 compensatory award.
BUSINESS
January 14, 1994 | GREG JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Taco Bell Corp. on Thursday denied allegations that it tried to infiltrate a Chicago-based company in 1991 to spy on a fast-food franchisee. In a suit filed in U.S. District Court in Chicago, franchisee Richard L. Cohn alleges that Taco Bell tried to gain access to his company illegally in 1991 by recommending that he hire a Houston-based Taco Bell executive to help run nine Chicago-area franchises.
BUSINESS
December 31, 1999 | Bloomberg News
Burger King Corp. was charged in a lawsuit with acting negligently when it distributed millions of potentially hazardous Pokemon balls to children. The suit, filed in Dallas County Court in Texas, came three days after the hamburger chain recalled the popular toy, which had been included in its Kids Meals for about two months, after reports that an 18-month-old girl suffocated on one of the toys.
BUSINESS
November 30, 1999 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Papa John's International Inc. and Tricon Global Restaurants Inc.'s Pizza Hut unit have agreed to let a federal judge resolve a bitter advertising dispute. The agreement between the feuding chains comes less than two weeks after a Dallas jury ruled that both companies made deceptive claims about each other's products. U.S. Magistrate Judge William Sanderson, who oversaw the recent trial, said he would rule on damages before Christmas. After a jury trial that ended Nov.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 27, 1998 | DARRELL SATZMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A 30-year-old Antelope Valley man has sued a local McDonald's, alleging he was ridiculed and denied service by an employee because he is gay. The alleged incident took place on the morning of May 23 when Matt Rosenberg went to the restaurant at 2427 Avenue S East in Palmdale with his mother and young niece.
BUSINESS
February 25, 1998
San Diego-based Foodmaker Inc., owner of the Jack in the Box fast-food chain, said it signed a $58.5-million settlement of lawsuits it filed against suppliers of meat that led to a deadly outbreak of illnesses caused by E. coli bacteria. Foodmaker has agreed to drop suits against Safeway Inc., among others, over meat it contends was tainted and that caused the deaths of four children in 1993.
NEWS
January 25, 1998 | HILARY MacGREGOR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A devout Hindu is suing a Taco Bell for serving him a beef burrito rather than the bean one he ordered. The one bite of beef he chewed violated Mukesh K. Rai's most fundamental religious principle, causing him emotional distress as well as medical expenses and loss of wages, he claimed in his suit filed last week. "Eating the cow, it was a really devastating experience," said Rai, reached at his Oxnard home Friday. "So much so that I had to go to a psychiatrist. I went to a doctor.
BUSINESS
October 7, 1997 | Reuters
The U.S. Supreme Court allowed the meat processing unit for Pleasanton-based Safeway Inc. to file an interstate lawsuit against a Jack-in-the-Box restaurant franchise over a deadly 1993 outbreak of food poisoning. The case stemmed from illnesses due to E. coli bacteria traced to hamburgers sold at Jack-in-the-Box restaurants in several Western states. Jack-in-the-Box is a division of San Diego-based Foodmaker Inc.
BUSINESS
August 15, 1996 | VICKI TORRES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An 11-year legal battle by a former Long Beach franchise owner has led to a landmark federal appeals court decision that provides store owners protection against abusive franchise chain practices. The Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals in San Francisco upheld a 1990 U.S. Bankruptcy Court ruling that awarded Debra Vylene Green, a Naugles Mexican restaurant operator, $2.8 million in damages.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 1, 1995
Four former and two present employees of Kentucky Fried Chicken outlets in the South Bay have filed suit against the fast food chain and one of its managers for alleged sexual harassment and discrimination. The suit alleges that between 1992 and 1994, former KFC Area Manager Robert Wyatt, 39, forced female employees at 19 KFC stores in the South Bay to engage in sexual activities with him as a condition of keeping their jobs, according to the plaintiff's attorney, Corin Kahn.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|