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Fast Food Restaurant

BUSINESS
December 24, 2010 | By Richard Mullins
Who's ready for a steaming-hot bowl of meat, eggs and cheese from Burger King for breakfast? Or a pizza with not just bacon but "double bacon" and six types of cheese? Rolling into 2011, fast-food joints across the country are set to deploy a potent new arsenal of greasy goodness for Americans who have grown numb to mere burgers. Think spicier, cheesier, gooier. The new items flout principles of healthful eating and instead celebrate a spirit of wanton gluttony. "There's been quite a bit of what we call carnival revival," said Darren Tristano, a restaurant expert at market researcher Technomic.
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NEWS
November 8, 2010 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times
It's no secret kids like fast food. And fast food likes kids--so much so that some companies have ramped up their marketing efforts in the past couple of years, says a new report released Monday from Yale University's Rudd Center for Food Policy & Obesity . The report details findings on fast food marketing and nutrition information, based on examining the marketing endeavors of 12 large national fast food chains. Researchers also looked at data on nutritional information in more than 3,000 children's meal combos and 2,781 menu items.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 15, 2010 | By Mary MacVean, Los Angeles Times
Ignoring a warning about heading down a "slippery slope" of regulation, the Los Angeles Planning Commission on Thursday unanimously approved a plan to regulate new stand-alone fast-food businesses in South L.A. The issue goes now to the City Council's planning committee, possibly in a couple of weeks, Councilwoman Jan Perry's office said. It would then go to the full council. New stand-alone fast-food restaurants would have to meet several criteria, such as being at least half a mile from another fast-food outlet unless granted an exemption.
BUSINESS
November 24, 2009 | By Jerry Hirsch
Adele Cabot and her husband used to dine out three or four times a week, regularly spending $75 to $100 at a sushi bar sampling rainbow rolls and yellowtail nigiri sushi. But that changed after Cabot, an adjunct professor of theater at UCLA, had to take a 6% salary cut. The couple now eat out half as much and frequent less expensive Mexican and Italian places. "I just don't want to spend the money to eat out a lot," Cabot said. With Thanksgiving this week and Christmas next month, restaurants are eager to win back customers such as Cabot who seemed to disappear amid a brutal summer for the nation's eateries.
BUSINESS
October 12, 2009 | Jerry Hirsch
Links found by researchers between snack foods and obesity in poor communities are prompting new calls for more regulation of convenience stores in South Los Angeles. The proposed new regulations under discussion are an outgrowth and expansion of last year's city restrictions on new fast-food restaurants in a 32-square-mile area of South Los Angeles. The area is home to about 500,000 residents, including those who live in West Adams, Baldwin Hills and Leimert Park. Motivated by new data focusing on convenience stores, civic activists and a City Council member favor limiting the development of new convenience stores.
BUSINESS
July 10, 2009 | Jerry Hirsch
Fast-food restaurants are pondering how to deal with a new California law that tells restaurants to make more nutritional information available to customers. For now, eateries must make brochures with calorie counts and other nutritional information readily available. In 2011 they will have to post the information on their menus and menu boards. Panda Express, the Rosemead-based chain that dominates the Chinese food segment of the quick-serve market, is trying to get ahead of the curve.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 28, 2009 | Dan Weikel
When Clifton Moore ran the Los Angeles airport system from 1968 to 1993, there wasn't much emphasis on dining and shopping for people waiting for their planes at LAX. About all they could get were the basics: a newspaper, a cup of coffee, cafeteria fare and a preflight libation. The mantra was "We are an airport, not a shopping mall," and people on the staff were proud that Los Angeles International Airport had the least concession space of any major airport in the United States. Not anymore.
OPINION
August 5, 2008 | Harold Goldstein and Eric Schlosser, Harold Goldstein is executive director of the California Center for Public Health Advocacy. Eric Schlosser is the author of "Fast Food Nation."
A new public health measure took effect July 1 in New York City, requiring fast-food and chain restaurants to post calorie information on their menu boards. In California, a similar proposal, SB 1420, introduced by state Sens. Alex Padilla (D-Pacoima) and Carole Migden (D-San Francisco), is being debated in the Legislature.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 30, 2008 | Molly Hennessy-Fiske and David Zahniser, Times Staff Writers
A law that would bar fast-food restaurants from opening in South Los Angeles for at least a year sailed through the Los Angeles City Council on Tuesday. The council approved the fast-food moratorium unanimously, despite complaints from representatives of McDonald's, Carl's Jr. and other companies, who said they were being unfairly targeted.
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