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July 14, 1991
As a person who often advises people how to effectively and safely lose weight, I'm angered by articles such as Mark Stuart Gill's "Losing It in Fat City" (June 2). It upsets me that such quackery continues to exist, taking advantage of consumers who are vulnerable. I urge the consumer to beware. If it looks too good to be true, it probably is. JENNIFER GARRISON South Pasadena
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 20, 2012 | By Dennis McLellan, Los Angeles Times
Susan Tyrrell, an eccentric, husky-voiced character actress best known for her Oscar-nominated supporting role as a blowsy barfly in director John Huston's 1972 movie "Fat City," has died. She was 67. Tyrrell died Saturday at her home in Austin, Texas, according to the Travis County medical examiner. The cause of death was not yet known. The actress, whose many film credits included "Islands in the Stream" (1977), "Angel" (1984) and "Cry-Baby" (1990), already had played a number of colorful character roles on stage in New York before being cast in "Fat City," a boxing drama starring Stacy Keach and Jeff Bridges.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 20, 2012 | By Dennis McLellan, Los Angeles Times
Susan Tyrrell, an eccentric, husky-voiced character actress best known for her Oscar-nominated supporting role as a blowsy barfly in director John Huston's 1972 movie "Fat City," has died. She was 67. Tyrrell died Saturday at her home in Austin, Texas, according to the Travis County medical examiner. The cause of death was not yet known. The actress, whose many film credits included "Islands in the Stream" (1977), "Angel" (1984) and "Cry-Baby" (1990), already had played a number of colorful character roles on stage in New York before being cast in "Fat City," a boxing drama starring Stacy Keach and Jeff Bridges.
NATIONAL
May 16, 2009 | Noam N. Levey
In tapping New York City Health Commissioner Thomas R. Frieden to head the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, President Obama on Friday chose an official who has been on the front lines of the fight against swine flu. Frieden, 48, helped lead New York's efforts over the last month to contain the spread of the disease, after the first concentrated outbreak in the U.S. was tied to a school in Queens.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 18, 1994
The lifestyle pages have been full of stories about boomers who are sick and tired of being healthy. They're falling off their exercise bikes and onto the couch, and there are even some who are picking up the old coffin nails again. ("Just one cigarette after dinner," one of these lapsed nonsmokers was heard to say. Yeah, right. As soon as we finish eating this one potato chip.
SPORTS
September 11, 2007 | Robyn Norwood, Times Staff Writer
Organizers of the 2012 London Olympics have agreed to a designers' recommendation that seats in the new 20,000-seat Aquatic Center should be four centimeters wider and five centimeters deeper than originally planned, the British tabloid the Sun reported. The reason: increasing girth. The total population of the United Kingdom is less than 61 million, yet the number who are, by definition, obese, is expected to reach 27.6 million by 2010.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 7, 1990 | ROBERT KOEHLER
Reporter Roger Bingham is becoming TV's main emcee of cute science, never passing up an opportunity to dress up a difficult idea with a visual joke or a groaner pun. Even before "Fat City," his report on all things overweight, begins tonight (7:30, KCET Channel 28), we can feel the approaching attack of the puns. And sooner than you can say spare tire , Bingham is walking in a tire yard to accent a remark about middle-aged paunch.
NEWS
February 27, 1987 | United Press International
This city is the fat capital of the Soviet Union, with about 40% of the city's 9 million residents overweight, the Communist Party newspaper Pravda said Thursday. The newspaper said that 25% of the 290 million Soviets are considered overweight. One in five Soviet children are considered too fat and medically endangered. Pravda did not give any exact figures for what doctors consider to be overweight but it did say Moscow was way out of line compared to the rest of the country, with 3.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 30, 1986 | DAVID NELSON
Fat City, the bizarre-looking Pacific Highway landmark that is trimmed with enough neon to illuminate a small town, lately has been making efforts to establish itself as a serious practitioner of contemporary cuisine. The most recent of these would be the hiring of executive chef Brian Ashe, who brought with him an impressive list of credits that includes a stint as executive chef at Los Angeles' venerable Scandia.
SPORTS
September 11, 2007 | Robyn Norwood, Times Staff Writer
Organizers of the 2012 London Olympics have agreed to a designers' recommendation that seats in the new 20,000-seat Aquatic Center should be four centimeters wider and five centimeters deeper than originally planned, the British tabloid the Sun reported. The reason: increasing girth. The total population of the United Kingdom is less than 61 million, yet the number who are, by definition, obese, is expected to reach 27.6 million by 2010.
HEALTH
November 6, 2006 | Ben Harder, Special to The Times
Some questions have pat answers -- such as, "Does this dress make me look fat?" (Of course not.) More tricky is the question of whether a person's address can make her fat. Many urban planners and health researchers think it can. In study after study, they have all but concluded that urban sprawl -- malls miles away, homes too far away for people to walk to shops, schools and parks -- contributes to obesity.
FOOD
July 6, 2005 | Laurie Winer, Special to The Times
When Daniel Negreanu gets a yen for a salad with chickpeas and peppers and hard-boiled eggs, it doesn't matter that it's not on the menu; the kitchen is happy to oblige. And if Jean Gluck wants her New York steak -- 12 ounces, crusted with cracked black pepper and seared in butter -- cut into bite-sized pieces, it will come cut into bite-sized pieces. These folks are not regulars at the Polo Lounge, nor are they aboard the QE2.
NEWS
June 28, 2005 | Hugo Martin, Times Staff Writer
Scientists are surprised at the success of California's newest elephant seal colony thriving in a rocky cove near San Simeon, despite its proximity to zooming cars on Highway 1 and hordes of gawking tourists. In a tale of adaptation and opportunity, biologists say the herd produced 3,500 pups last winter, 16% more than the year before and a rate higher than at other colonies. Yet, the increase occurs in the shadow of intense human activity.
SPORTS
January 13, 2003 | Bill Plaschke
It started before it started. Frank Middleton of the Oakland Raiders stomped to midfield just before kickoff Sunday, yanked off his helmet, and glared at the New York Jets. "One of their guys had been asking for me all week, so I let him know I was here," Middleton said. "The black guy. The fat guy. Number 73. Right here. Somebody want me? Come get me." Matt Turk, the Jet punter, asked Middleton to chill. Middleton got hotter.
SPORTS
February 20, 2002 | JASON REID, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mo Vaughn is in a New York state of mind, recharged by his bustling new surroundings and eager to reaffirm his star power. The New York Met first baseman, who reported to spring training here Tuesday, is reveling in his good fortune, having been given a chance to revive his stagnant career in baseball's marquee city. Vaughn quickly embraced the Big Apple after three demoralizing seasons with the Angels, saying he wasn't suited for the laid-back Southland.
SPORTS
January 19, 2002 | DIANE PUCIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was the symbol for the season, the ultimate talisman for the Chicago Bears. Keith Traylor, a 6-foot-2 defensive lineman for the Chicago Bears who weighs about 320 ... or 330 ... or 340 pounds, found himself with a football in his hands and open field ahead of him. Lots of open field. In the regular-season finale against Jacksonville, Traylor intercepted a pass. Then he ran for 67 yards. He looked for someone speedier, lighter, to lateral to. No one was close. He huffed and he puffed.
SPORTS
May 18, 2001 | PETER YOON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Tony Alcantar arrived at Santa Ana College last season with little fanfare. He was a solid-hitting first baseman who had taken a year off after graduating from Katella High. He was overweight and had not traveled the avenues one normally takes for success. There were no travel-ball or scout-league teams on his resume, just a couple of all-league selections in high school. As first basemen go, his type was a dime a dozen: hit for power, not much else.
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