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ENTERTAINMENT
June 30, 2001
Regarding the commentary by Carla Kucinski lamenting the increased use of "fat suits" by actors and comedians ("Hollywood Beefs Up for a Good Laugh," June 27): If any obese people are upset by the humor generated by actors in fat costumes, they should either develop thicker skins or eat less and exercise more. Forgive my callous attitude, but as a short man (5-feet-4), I have always had to put up with Hollywood's endless stereotyping of short men as either buffoons or psychos. From the torrent of short jokes in movies like "Shrek" to a TV show like "ER," in which each male character's level of decency and competency corresponds directly to how tall he is (if you've never noticed this, pay attention the next time you watch)
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BUSINESS
April 29, 1989 | MARY ANN GALANTE, Times Staff Writer
Carl's Jr. is getting an oil change. The fast-food chain announced this week that it is testing cholesterol-free french fries, zucchini and onion rings in its 30 San Diego restaurants. The outlets are cooking all of their fried products in a blend of corn and soybean oil, rather than an animal-vegetable blend, a saturated fat that generally is considered less healthy. If enough customers sink their teeth into the lower-fat food, the Anaheim-based chain says it will switch to vegetable oil in all 490 of its stores.
NEWS
August 11, 1995 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
For the second time in less than a year, researchers have pinpointed a genetic flaw that makes people fat. Three international teams of researchers reported Thursday that they have identified a common defect in a gene that regulates how fast the body burns calories. Those with the bad gene tend to grow potbellies and develop diabetes earlier in adulthood.
FOOD
May 25, 1989 | TONI TIPTON
Memorial Day usually signals the beginning of the outdoor barbecue season, but it can also begin a period of anxiety for fat-watchers since some favorite grilled items are major sources of saturated fat--the dietary element most recently implicated in raising serum cholesterol. Beef roasts and steaks, cheeseburgers and frankfurters are among the top sources of saturated fat in the diet, according to a recent issue of Environmental Nutrition, a diet, nutrition and health newsletter written by registered dietitians.
FOOD
May 4, 1989 | TONI TIPTON
Mexican food is arguably the most popular cuisine in Los Angeles, especially at this time of year when so many families celebrate Cinco de Mayo. But a great number of Angelenos have eliminated the celebrated cuisine from their list of acceptable foods because of its high saturated fat and cholesterol content. Consider the typical restaurant combination dinner. A standard Mexican meal includes a cheese enchilada, beef taco, refried beans, rice and the obligatory basket of chips and salsa.
FOOD
April 20, 1989 | BETSEY BALSLEY, Times Food Editor
I heard friends brag about how they "lost seven pounds in one week" on a special diet. But one seldom hears how they put it all back on the instant they went off the miracle cure. Diets come and diets go. One recommends loading up on carbohydrates. Another suggests that everything will be fine if you just eliminate all fats. Still another offers total success if you simply live on some sort of master-mix drinkable meals. And each is billed as absolutely the best and easiest way to get your weight exactly where you want it with the least trouble.
BUSINESS
February 17, 1992 | KEVIN E. CULLINANE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Imagine being able to eat gallons of ice cream, trays of pastries and huge bags of french fries without having to worry about consuming too many calories or too much fat and cholesterol. Now you can. Following the success of sugar substitutes such as NutraSweet, food-making companies have streamed into the fat-replacement market with products that imitate the texture and consistency of oils, butter, lard and other authentic fats.
NEWS
May 4, 1995 | CONNIE KOENENN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sitting in his rose-carpeted and teakwood office, amid modern art and pictures of his grandchildren, Phil Sokolof in his gray suit and subdued floral print tie appears the model of a conservative businessman. But Sokolof, a self-made multimillionaire, sold his construction material business in 1992 to devote all his time to his crusade against cholesterol. His self-financed National Heart Savers Assn.
NEWS
June 15, 1998 | From Associated Press
Some AIDS patients are developing a bizarre syndrome of disfiguring fat deposits on parts of their bodies as their faces and limbs shrink to skin and bones--possibly side effects of lifesaving drugs called protease inhibitors. Doctors' reports to the government paint a stark picture: Three women looked like "apples on a stick" from the mound of stomach and breast fat above bird-like legs. Another patient developed a large hump on the nape of his neck like a buffalo's.
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