Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsFather Gregory Boyle
IN THE NEWS

Father Gregory Boyle

FEATURED ARTICLES
OPINION
April 10, 2010 | Patt Morrison
I should have known better than to try to interview Father Gregory Boyle on his home turf, at the Homegirl Café in the Homeboy Industries building on the edge of Chinatown. It was like trying to interview Elvis in the lobby of the Flamingo Hotel. Old ladies, homeboys, artists, a City Council member -- everybody wanted to say hi to the man who, from nothing -- less than nothing, which is to say, derision and debt and doubt -- crafted what is now the biggest gang "exit" program in the country.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
January 31, 2014 | Bill Plaschke
Yasiel Puig moved smoothly among the cooks and bakers of Homeboy Industries, purposefully gliding through the crowded kitchens as if taking that wide turn around first base. He autographed a worker's shirt sleeve directly above her tattoos, adding his own indelible ink. He pulled a plastic hair net over the eyes of another worker, laughing while posing for a photo. He used his giant hands to deftly dunk a roll into a bowl of freshly made guacamole while raving about its delights to two blushing young women.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 6, 1992
Father Gregory Boyle's success among the "home boys" of Boyle Heights was that he saw right through the tattooed skins and outward toughness to the spark of spirituality beneath the surface. WILLIAM H. HENSEY JR. Mexican American Opportunity Foundation City of Commerce
OPINION
January 28, 2014
Re "Homeboy Industries is a struggling success story," Column, Jan. 26 While Steve Lopez was interviewing the inimitable Father Gregory Boyle last Wednesday, two of his Homeboy Industries success stories were guiding 50 kids from Venice High School's POPS club around the premises, telling us the stories of their rebuilt lives. In two hours, our students - whose lives are touched by prison, with a parent or another loved one inside - were changed forever. The moment we stepped off the bus and the kids recognized rival gang members and saw them shaking hands, working side by side, their eyes, ears and hearts expanded.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 25, 2013 | By Oliver Gettell
Father Gregory Boyle is many things to many people, but he's perhaps best known as the founder of L.A.'s own Homeboy Industries, the largest gang-intervention program in the country. Over the last two decades, the Jesuit priest and native Angeleno has worked to provide former gang members and at-risk youths a way out, according to his motto, "Jobs not jails. " Freida Lee Mock's new documentary portrait of Boyle, "G-Dog," takes its title from Boyle's local nickname and follows him and as he tries to keep Homeboy afloat during a period of economic hardship.
OPINION
April 15, 2010
Church and state Re "An unapologetic Catholic voice," April 12 I began reading the article on Archbishop Jose Gomez with admiration, but ended in horror. Gomez has taken admirable positions in favor of some human rights. But then he endorsed a federal constitutional amendment prohibiting same-sex marriage and "assailed President Obama's healthcare reform package, largely because he felt it would increase the number of abortions" -- mistakenly, I believe. But this is merely Catholic orthodoxy.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 17, 2010 | By Celeste Fremon
For the last 20 years, Father Gregory Boyle has been writing -- and not writing -- the book that is his newly released memoir, "Tattoos on the Heart: The Power of Boundless Compassion" (Free Press: 220 pp., $25). The difficulty was never a lack of material. For as long as I've known him, Boyle has been amassing a stupendously rich cache of stories about the homeboys and homegirls who one way or another found their way to his doorstep. Boyle was already not writing his book when I met him in the fall of 1990.
MAGAZINE
August 11, 1991 | CELESTE FREMON, Celeste Fremon's last piece for Los Angeles Times Magazine concerned the final days of Bruno Bettelheim. She is writing a book on Father Boyle and the Pico-Aliso gangs
At exactly 7 p.m. on an uncommonly warm night in early March, 1990, some 300 mourners, most of them members of the Latino gang the East L.A. Dukes, descend upon Dolores Mission Church at the corner of 3rd and Gless streets in Boyle Heights. They arrive by the carload and cram themselves into the scarred wooden pews that fill the sanctuary. As they file into the small stucco building, they cast edgy glances toward the street, as if expecting trouble.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 8, 2011 | By David Ng, Los Angeles Times
Born into a family of gangbangers, Alicia Cadena grew up knowing only a life of crime. At 16, she left home and joined a gang in Bell Gardens. She engaged in theft, landed in jail for four months and then started selling drugs. After she lost custody of her three children, she decided to turn her life around. "I had been to different places — rehab centers and shelters," she said. Then a friend told her about Homeboy Industries, the gang intervention center run by Father Gregory Boyle.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 1, 2011 | Steve Lopez
It took me quite a while to get to Father Gregory Boyle's office at Homeboy Industries and finally spend some time with him. Exactly 10 years, in fact, and that was way too long. We've chatted briefly on occasion, but as I explained to him on Wednesday, he seemed to already have been spoken for when I started writing columns for The Times in 2001. Reporters and other columnists knew him as both a source and a friend, and Boyle's years-long mission to turn gang members into working taxpayers was already well-documented.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 26, 2014 | STEVE LOPEZ
It was Father Gregory Boyle's first invitation to address the Los Angeles Police Commission, and he had something to get off his chest. For a quarter of a century, Boyle has steered boys and girls, and men and women, out of the gang life through Homeboy Industries, which offers job training, counseling, tattoo removal and more. The model Boyle built has been replicated around the country and abroad. Here in Los Angeles, some 120,000 gang members have voluntarily asked Father Boyle for help starting over.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 25, 2013 | By Oliver Gettell
Father Gregory Boyle is many things to many people, but he's perhaps best known as the founder of L.A.'s own Homeboy Industries, the largest gang-intervention program in the country. Over the last two decades, the Jesuit priest and native Angeleno has worked to provide former gang members and at-risk youths a way out, according to his motto, "Jobs not jails. " Freida Lee Mock's new documentary portrait of Boyle, "G-Dog," takes its title from Boyle's local nickname and follows him and as he tries to keep Homeboy afloat during a period of economic hardship.
OPINION
April 23, 2012 | Jim Newton
Imagine Los Angeles without Homeboy Industries. Imagine that the 350 or so men and women who work at Homeboy's various operations instead had no help finding jobs. Imagine that the 500 or so young people in the pipeline for work at Homeboy were suddenly deprived of that chance for gainful employment, security, support and stability. Imagine that the thousands of young men and women who every year have tattoos removed at Homeboy instead showed up for job interviews with necks and arms and shoulders boasting of a life they'd prefer to put behind them.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 26, 2011 | By Mitchell Landsberg, Los Angeles Times
Santa, as usual, was a no-show at the Men's Central Jail. In his place Sunday came three presumably wise men - Archbishop Jose Gomez, Los Angeles County Sheriff Lee Baca and Sheriff's Capt. Ralph Ornelas, making their way down long, dimly lit rows of cellblocks to dispense Christmas cheer. At least, as much as was possible in a place where one day is pretty much like the last. "Merry Christmas! Feliz Navidad!" Gomez proclaimed over and over as he walked down the line of narrow, cramped cells, trailed by volunteer carolers.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 8, 2011 | By David Ng, Los Angeles Times
Born into a family of gangbangers, Alicia Cadena grew up knowing only a life of crime. At 16, she left home and joined a gang in Bell Gardens. She engaged in theft, landed in jail for four months and then started selling drugs. After she lost custody of her three children, she decided to turn her life around. "I had been to different places — rehab centers and shelters," she said. Then a friend told her about Homeboy Industries, the gang intervention center run by Father Gregory Boyle.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 11, 2011 | By Kate Linthicum, Los Angeles Times
With tattoos up and down his arms, a long black ponytail and an even longer criminal record, Alex Renteria isn't like most people in this building. Before this job, he had done only one kind of work: "slinging dope and stealing. " Now, he slings tamales and fresh-baked pastries at a bright diner at City Hall. Homeboy Diner, which opened this week, is the latest business venture of Homeboy Industries, a Los Angeles institution that supporters say has helped thousands of gang members quit lives of crime with counseling, tattoo removal and job training.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 15, 2010 | By Hector Becerra, Los Angeles Times
This should be a triumphant moment for Father Gregory Boyle. The founder of Homeboy Industries just published a memoir that has been well reviewed, and focused more attention on his decades of work using jobs to get young people out of gangs. A major supermarket wants to mass-produce Homegirl Cafe's salsa, and the priest dreams that it could become Homeboy Industries' version of Newman's Own salad dressing. The cafe is even in the running to expand into a new wing at LAX, Boyle said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 1, 2011 | Steve Lopez
It took me quite a while to get to Father Gregory Boyle's office at Homeboy Industries and finally spend some time with him. Exactly 10 years, in fact, and that was way too long. We've chatted briefly on occasion, but as I explained to him on Wednesday, he seemed to already have been spoken for when I started writing columns for The Times in 2001. Reporters and other columnists knew him as both a source and a friend, and Boyle's years-long mission to turn gang members into working taxpayers was already well-documented.
BUSINESS
November 10, 2010 | By Stuart Pfeifer, Los Angeles Times
Bruce Karatz, homeboy? The former KB Home chief executive, who is to be sentenced Wednesday on three felony convictions in a stock option manipulation case, has been volunteering his services for the last six months at the Homeboy Industries gang-intervention program in Los Angeles. Karatz has helped the financially troubled agency by "finding bold and creative ways to broaden our brand, increase the revenue in our businesses and invite more stakeholders to invest," said Father Gregory Boyle, Homeboy's founder and executive director.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|