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Fatherhood

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OPINION
January 1, 1995
I am writing in response to David Blankenhorn's plea (Commentary, Dec. 19) for "responsible fathers" instead of orphanages or prisons. I agree that a healthy family structure may depend on "recovering the fatherhood idea." However, while the term fatherhood, along with motherhood, conjures up images of traditional roles, I believe that "recovering fatherhood" does not go far enough in defining needs related to 20th-Century reality. Consider the linguistic similarity, but the differing connotation of the words fathering and mothering: to father suggests the mere act of siring a child, whereas to mother is laden with images of care and nurturance.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 20, 2013 | By Emily Alpert Reyes
Defying enduring stereotypes about black fatherhood, a federal survey of American parents shows that by most measures, black fathers who live with their children are just as involved as other dads who live with their kids - or more so. For instance, among fathers who lived with young children, 70% of black dads said they bathed, diapered or dressed those kids every day, compared with 60% of white fathers and 45% of Latino fathers, according to...
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 2013 | By David C. Nichols
“My name is Knott. Doug Knott. And I am the last of the Knotts.” With that plainspoken declaration, “Last of the Knotts” begins its idiomatic trek inside the psyche of a self-proclaimed hipster. Raw, fluid and eloquently quirky, author-performer Knott's unsparingly honest solo treatise on his avoidance of fatherhood conjoins vintage performance art tactics to the sort of descriptive specifics usually associated with classic short stories. At first, it appears that this “one-man comi-tragedy” could be mannered, given Knott's idiosyncratic vocal attack, equal parts William S. Burroughs and saxophone.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 21, 2013 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
Vince Vaughn and his new movie, "Delivery Man," have me rethinking my vow to avoid using the description "feel-good" before the word "movie" at all costs. This is Vaughn at his most vulnerable. As much as the wisecracking actor at a different point in his career might have bristled at the description, "Delivery Man," a heart-tugging new comedy about fatherhood and family, is warm as well as wry. Yes, this is a slight film. But there's a very likable ensemble around Vaughn, led by "Parks and Recreation's" Chris Pratt as his best friend, Brett, along with wonderful Polish actor Andrzej Blumenfeld as his father, Mikolaj.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 1, 2012 | By Oliver Gettell
Just ahead of Father's Day, new dads Neil Patrick Harris and partner David Burtka joined Oprah Winfrey to talk about the challenges and rewards of having children as a same-sex couple and of raising twins. “We really, really wanted kids,” Harris says in a clip from “Oprah's Next Chapter,” airing Sunday. “We really had thought it through financially, emotionally, relationship-wise. We didn't just accidentally get pregnant and decide that now we need to make this work.
MAGAZINE
November 2, 1997
Michael Connelly's essay on fatherhood was a gem ("Sunshine on the Dark Side," Sept. 7). Although I do not write hard-boiled crime novels for a living, I have, as does everyone, my dark places. Fortunately, the joy of having children keeps me from getting bogged down there for too long. Welcome to the fraternity of fatherhood, Michael. Now you know. Tom Orr Huntington Beach There is no way one can be prepared for the emotional attachment that develops between a parent and child.
NATIONAL
June 22, 2010 | By Christi Parsons, Tribune Washington Bureau
President Obama on Monday pledged a series of new initiatives to support responsible fatherhood, but called on fathers to recognize that government cannot do what they can best do in the home. In his annual Father's Day event, Obama urged fathers to mentor their children and to reach out to those in the community who don't have strong parental or guardian support. "I can't legislate fatherhood. I can't force anybody to love a child," Obama told a crowd gathered at a community center in southeast Washington.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 31, 1985 | ELIZABETH MEHREN, Times Staff Writer
On one episode of "The Cosby Show" last fall, the new boyfriend of Bill Cosby's TV daughter shows up for their first date . . . wearing an earring. "It's a conversation piece with you older people," the boyfriend tells Cosby, prompting cheers, laughter and a nationwide groan of recognition from millions of fathers across the country. In New York, one incipient father responded instead as if struck by a bolt of lightning.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 6, 2002 | CHRIS ERSKINE
The cat's in heat again, meowing and rolling around like Anna Nicole Smith. My wife is menopausal-pregnant. The kids are entering Christmas mode. "Fatherhood is for good," the sign on the bus stop warns. Of all things, you think to yourself. "Here, help me out of this chair," says my pregnant bride. "I'm having a good hair week," announces the little girl. "Can I have 20 bucks?" the boy asks. "Meow," screams the sex-crazed cat. "And I mean it."
HEALTH
December 12, 2011 | By Dalina Castellanos, Los Angeles Times
Ten tiny fingers and 10 tiny toes may be enough to change men's lives in ways they never thought possible. A recent study found that some men dropped their delinquent ways when they went from "hood" to fatherhood. The research, conducted by scientists in Oregon and Texas, tracked 206 males from a medium-size metropolitan city in the Pacific Northwest. Participants were recruited at age 12 and assessed annually over 19 years, until age 31. All males in the study were from neighborhoods with higher than average rates of juvenile delinquency and where kids were more prone to smoke, drink and participate in criminal actions.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 16, 2013 | By Stephen Burt
Jennifer Finney Boylan was the father of two young boys, a devoted husband, a keyboard player in bar bands, the author of three published novels, and an English professor in Maine when she began the process that would make her outwardly - anatomically and socially - the woman she felt she had always been on the inside. Her book about life before, during and after that transition, "She's Not There" (2003), made her a guiding star for many transgender readers: Here was somebody who made all the changes she needed and, despite all the growing pains, got to keep most of her life.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 4, 2013 | By Mikael Wood, Los Angeles Times
On a faux-suburban street on the Universal Studios back lot, Michael Bublé was preparing to dodge a series of explosions, part of a recent pyro-heavy video shoot for his single, "It's a Beautiful Day. " So you might've expected the Canadian crooner - known for a string of platinum-selling standards albums including 2011's "Christmas," which was that year's second-biggest commercial hit - to have some fire-related questions for the crew. For instance: Where do I stand to avoid being burned?
ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 2013 | By David C. Nichols
“My name is Knott. Doug Knott. And I am the last of the Knotts.” With that plainspoken declaration, “Last of the Knotts” begins its idiomatic trek inside the psyche of a self-proclaimed hipster. Raw, fluid and eloquently quirky, author-performer Knott's unsparingly honest solo treatise on his avoidance of fatherhood conjoins vintage performance art tactics to the sort of descriptive specifics usually associated with classic short stories. At first, it appears that this “one-man comi-tragedy” could be mannered, given Knott's idiosyncratic vocal attack, equal parts William S. Burroughs and saxophone.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 17, 2013 | By Kurt Streeter, Los Angeles Times
Craig McGruder tilts his head to hear a plea for help in the heart of Watts. "I've got trouble," says a guy who used to run with the Grape Street Crips. "Been thinking about doing some dirt. Thinking about robbing so I can get my kids the school supplies they need. " McGruder understands trouble. He'd grown up with most of the men meeting in this white-walled community center on a midsummer night. Some had been dealers who'd sold him crack when he was at his lowest, skulking around Jordan Downs, where he'd been born in 1962 and never much left.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 15, 2012 | By Mark Olsen
The feature debut from Irish writer-director Ciarán Foy, "Citadel" attempts to transform mundane anxieties into the stuff of a horror film. But the initial tension of the premise dissipates like a slow leak. Tommy (Aneurin Barnard) is trapped inside an elevator watching helplessly as hooded thugs attack his pregnant wife. Stabbed with a syringe, she goes into a coma and never awakens, though doctors successfully deliver the baby. The film then becomes a parable of urban anxiety and the fear of fatherhood, as Tommy develops severe agoraphobia, refusing to leave his apartment while also becoming convinced those same kids are coming back for his newborn infant.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 25, 2012 | By Mary McNamara, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
Jimmy Fallon had a vision: Three men stood at a bar, as men often do, but then they turned around and lo, it was revealed that each wore a Baby Bjorn, with an actual baby. He would call it "Guys With Kids," which after a sneak preview earlier this month premieres in its regular time slot Wednesday. It's not much to build a comedy on, as the pilot for NBC's "Guys With Kids" makes abundantly clear. But perhaps Fallon can be forgiven for viewing the fact that some men take care of their own children as earthshaking news because we keep treating it as such.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 15, 2012 | By Mark Olsen
The feature debut from Irish writer-director Ciarán Foy, "Citadel" attempts to transform mundane anxieties into the stuff of a horror film. But the initial tension of the premise dissipates like a slow leak. Tommy (Aneurin Barnard) is trapped inside an elevator watching helplessly as hooded thugs attack his pregnant wife. Stabbed with a syringe, she goes into a coma and never awakens, though doctors successfully deliver the baby. The film then becomes a parable of urban anxiety and the fear of fatherhood, as Tommy develops severe agoraphobia, refusing to leave his apartment while also becoming convinced those same kids are coming back for his newborn infant.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 5, 2009 | By Glenn Whipp
In "Everybody's Fine," Robert De Niro plays a role that he has spent most of his adult life researching out of the public eye -- an imperfect father learning along the way. Known for his meticulous preparation, De Niro didn't have to step far out of his own shoes to connect with the film's Frank Goode, a demanding dad who, now in his 60s, wants nothing more than to gather his four adult children around the same table. "Bob's at that age where a lot of guys look back and think, 'Wow, that went quick . . . maybe I should have spent more time with the kids,' " says "Everybody's Fine" writer-director Kirk Jones.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 20, 2012
COMEDY Part of the groundbreaking "Comedians of Comedy" tour that included Patton Oswalt, Zach Galiafinakis and Maria Bamford, Brian Posehn will look familiar to those who have seen his comic timing on television's "Just Shoot Me" and "The Sarah Silverman Program. " Onstage Posehn turns his twisted wit on topics such his recent fatherhood and obsession with metal, and here he leads a bill that includes Arj Barker, Kyle Kinane and Pete Holmes. Club Nokia, 800 West Olympic Blvd, Suite A335, L.A. 8:30 p.m. Fri. $15-$28 http://www.clubnokia.com .
ENTERTAINMENT
August 11, 2012 | By T.L. Stanley
Darnell Wilson is frozen like a deer in headlights. He looks directly into the camera, eyes buggy and wide, and admits he's not sure how he'll cope with the challenge in front of him. The source of his anxiety might send shivers down a lot of men's spines. He's agreed to run his household and take care of his two young children while his wife is away, and completely incommunicado, for a week. Wilson, a railroad worker, is a participant in Lifetime's five-part series "The Week the Women Went," which packed a group of wives from a small South Carolina town off to a resort, leaving their husbands at home to juggle kids, homework, dinner, birthday parties and beauty pageants.
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