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SCIENCE
January 16, 2014 | By Melissa Healy
Imagine for a moment that all of the nation's fast-food establishments--all the striped awnings and golden arches, the drive-thru windows, the beckoning dollar deals and wafting odor of French fries--were to vanish overnight. Would the number of our kids who carry an unhealthful amount of extra weight plummet? The answer is very likely no, says a study published Thursday in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. Because if you shut off the supply of 24-ounce fountain drinks, bacon cheeseburgers, fried chicken and stuffed tacos, the children who frequently eat at fast-food restaurants will go home and do what they generally do when not eating at a fast-food restaurant: They'll snarf cookies and chips, chug sugar-sweetened soda from a bottle, and heat up frozen pizzas.
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BUSINESS
April 16, 2014 | By Tiffany Hsu
Artificial trans fat still lurks in our food, at least at the Joe's Crab Shack chain, according to a health watchdog group. The Center for Science in the Public Interest said Wednesday that the Houston-based seafood restaurant company uses a blend of partially hydrogenated margarine-butter blend containing dangerous levels of trans fat. Joe's Crab Shack, which was established in 1994, did not immediately respond to requests for comment....
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BUSINESS
March 19, 1989
Those in the medical profession have failed to point out the most significant fact concerning the specious campaign by the Omaha millionaire and his friends in the soybean industry to pressure food processors into switching from saturated to unsaturated fats ("Health Crusader Targets Nabisco in Latest Battle Over Use of Tropical Oils," March 2), so I shall do so. Numerous studies, dating back to the 1961 Wadsworth Veterans' Administration Hospital study, have shown that substituting unsaturated fats for saturated fats in the diet does indeed reduce mortality from heart disease but raises mortality from cancer, so that the total death rate remains about the same.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 22, 2014 | By Elaine Woo
When the offbeat BBC cooking show "Two Fat Ladies" was given a green light in 1996, costar Clarissa Dickson Wright did not have the highest hopes. "I found it very hard to believe," she later wrote, "and thought perhaps it might be a cult series with a moderate but good audience. We had no idea. " It quickly became an immense hit - on both sides of the Atlantic. In the U.S., where it made its debut in 1997, "Two Fat Ladies" helped grease Food Network's ascent to a cable TV powerhouse, earning top prime-time ratings that made Dickson Wright and co-host Jennifer Paterson bona fide, if improbable, celebrities.
HEALTH
November 7, 2005 | Emily Singer, Special to The Times
BITING into a perfectly cooked French fry can be a taste of heaven, but what makes that fry so enticing? New research shows that the allure of greasy treats may come from a special sensor in your taste buds that's tuned to fat. Both animals and humans show a natural preference for fatty foods.
HEALTH
June 11, 2001 | SHELDON MARGEN and DALE A. OGAR
Have you noticed that when you buy a can of fancy mixed nuts, the label invariably proclaims "less than 10% peanuts"? This is not because there's something wrong with peanuts. Quite the opposite, in fact. What you're seeing is truth in labeling, because in the social hierarchy of nuts, peanuts are the poor relations.
HEALTH
June 28, 1999 | SHELDON MARGEN and DALE A. OGAR, Dr. Sheldon Margen is professor of public health at UC Berkeley; Dale A. Ogar is managing editor of the UC Berkeley Wellness Letter. They are the authors of several books, including "The Wellness Encyclopedia of Food and Nutrition."
Over the years, we have given our readers a number of excellent recipes from the two low-fat cookbooks produced by the writers of the Berkeley Wellness Letter. While we got into the game early, there are now hundreds of good low-fat cookbooks available, so nobody should have a hard time finding easy ways to prepare delicious, healthy meals.
NEWS
April 10, 2001 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
Fat, the great American obsession, may provide a new source of replacement cells for a variety of medical treatments and eliminate the need for the controversial use of embryonic stem cells. A team of researchers from UCLA and the University of Pittsburgh has isolated stem cells--primitive cells with the potential to become virtually any type of tissue--from fat collected by liposuction and converted them into bone, cartilage and muscle.
BUSINESS
August 25, 2006 | From Bloomberg News
Wendy's International Inc. switched all 6,000 of its U.S. restaurants to a more healthful cooking oil that doesn't contain any of trans fats, which increase the risk of heart disease. The new oil, a blend made from corn and soybeans, doesn't cost any more and needs no special handling, Wendy's spokesman Bob Bertini said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 5, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Service Reports
Heart-conscious eaters who are fed up with low-fat diets can safely add some olive oil and other monounsaturated fats to their daily fare, but the extra dose probably won't reduce their cholesterol, a study concludes. Scientists have been searching for foods that prevent disease rather than cause it, and monounsaturated fat has been among the possible candidates. A study examining it was published in last week's New England Journal of Medicine.
SCIENCE
March 13, 2014 | By Melissa Healy
If you're a student of fat - and who isn't these days? - you know that the FTO gene is the gene thought to be most responsible for some people's inherited propensity to become obese. Well, forget that. A multinational group of geneticists has discovered that, more likely, the real obesity gene is named IRX3, and it is very far from the FTO gene - or would be, if DNA were to be stretched out in linear fashion instead of coiled up like a skein of yarn. In a letter posted Wednesday to the website of the journal Nature, University of Chicago geneticists Scott Smemo and Marcelo A. Nobrega, along with a team of Canadian and Spanish researchers, wrote that geneticists hunting for the obesity gene appear to have fallen into a trap: They assumed that genetic variations they could see have only local effects, and do not affect the workings of far-away genes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 3, 2014 | By Emily Foxhall
The topiary dolphins at the entrance to Corona del Mar -- once shaped so precisely they appeared to be leaping out onto bustling Coast Highway -- have begun to resemble manatees. Leaf-trimming couldn't save the creatures; no specialty pruner could be found. So the city has decided to remove the iconic bushes and hire someone to grow and groom new ones. "It's very, very difficult to get them back to the original shape unless you're like an Edward Scissorhands ," said Kathy Sommer , a horticulturalist who works with the city on plant care issues.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 26, 2014 | By Samantha Schaefer and Ari Bloomekatz
The two 10-month-old mountain lion cubs caught by a remote camera feeding on a mule deer carcass in Malibu Creek State Park last week provided welcome relief to researchers who hadn't seen them since they were just 3 weeks old. Biologist Jeff  Sikich  with the National Park Service called the cubs, designated P-30 and P-28, "nice and fat. " "Mom seems to be finding deer and prey for them," he said. Four years ago, "mom" was hailed by  the Park Service as an unknown mountain lion discovered in the Hidden Valley area of the Santa Monica Mountains.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 7, 2014 | By Christy Khoshaba
From the moment Channing Tatum gyrated and swayed his way to see Ellen DeGeneres on her talk show earlier this week, the women in the crowd couldn't contain themselves. They shrieked and bolted out of their seats at the sight of People's 2012 Sexiest Man Alive. “See what you've gone and done,” Ellen began, after busting out some impressive moves herself. “Since 'Magic Mike,'  now whenever you dance, we think you're going to take your clothes off.” Cue the (additional)
NEWS
January 30, 2014 | By Seema Mehta
First Lady Michelle Obama on Wednesday urged supporters in Los Angeles to donate money to boost Democratic prospects in the 2014 midterm election, saying such efforts were crucial to President Obama's ability to accomplish the goals he laid out in his State of the Union speech the night before. "We need to be engaged right from the beginning, and this is where all of you here tonight come in. This is your part, because there is something all of you can do right now, today, to make a difference….
SCIENCE
January 16, 2014 | By Melissa Healy
Imagine for a moment that all of the nation's fast-food establishments--all the striped awnings and golden arches, the drive-thru windows, the beckoning dollar deals and wafting odor of French fries--were to vanish overnight. Would the number of our kids who carry an unhealthful amount of extra weight plummet? The answer is very likely no, says a study published Thursday in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. Because if you shut off the supply of 24-ounce fountain drinks, bacon cheeseburgers, fried chicken and stuffed tacos, the children who frequently eat at fast-food restaurants will go home and do what they generally do when not eating at a fast-food restaurant: They'll snarf cookies and chips, chug sugar-sweetened soda from a bottle, and heat up frozen pizzas.
NEWS
November 26, 1997 | From Associated Press
So-called healthy fats such as olive oil are just as bad as butter in raising levels of a blood clotting factor that may boost the risk of a heart attack or a stroke in the first few hours after a meal, researchers say. The study did not look at the long-term dangers of various fats; these dangers are well-known. For example, eating saturated fats such as butter raises cholesterol levels, increasing the risk of heart disease.
NEWS
June 26, 1990 | SHARI ROAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Americans need only look at the Chinese, Japanese and Southern Italians to see we eat far too much fat, say authors of several recent studies pointing to the strong connection between dietary fat and particular types of cancers. Dietary fat, fondly found in such goodies as ice cream and avocados, is a well-known contributor to heart disease, diabetes and high blood pressure.
BUSINESS
January 7, 2014 | By David Pierson
For generations, butter got a bad rap. It was thought to be cloying, fattening, dangerous for your arteries, and it took a creaming from oil-based substitutes like margarine. Now with the trans fats in those alternatives under fire, everyone from iron chefs to home cooks is reexamining butter's place on the refrigerator shelf. The yellow spread served at Joan Hemphill's Seal Beach home tastes like butter - because it is butter. "I use way too much," Hemphill concedes.
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