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Fats Domino

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NATIONAL
May 20, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
Fats Domino took the stage before a sold-out crowd in a New Orleans nightclub, marking the Rock and Roll Hall of Famer's first public performance since Hurricane Katrina. The 79-year-old New Orleans icon was crisp and energetic as he sang and played the piano. The crowd jumped and screamed when he belted out "Blueberry Hill." Domino lost his home, his pianos, his gold and platinum records, and much of the city he loves during Katrina.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 6, 2012 | By Randy Lewis
The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame's salute to Chuck Berry as the 2012 honoree for its "American Masters" series will be capped with a multi-artist concert featuring Ernie Isley of the Isley Brothers, Darryl McDaniels of Run DMC, New York Dolls singer David Johansen, roots-rock singer-songwriter-guitarist Rosie Flores, Motorhead front man Lemmy Kilmister, guitarist Joe Bonamassa, Oklahoma singer-songwriter John Fullbright and several others, including Berry...
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 6, 2006 | From the Associated Press
Sitting at a keyboard in the bedroom of his post-Katrina home in the New Orleans suburb of Harvey, La., a smiling Fats Domino joked, laughed and tenderly sang to a handful of close friends this week as he prepared for his appearance Sunday at the closing of the New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Festival. Domino is excited -- even nervous -- about his first performance since Katrina struck last August.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 23, 2012 | By Randy Lewis
There's just one question about the announcement that  Chuck Berry is the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum's honoree for the 17 th installment of its American Music Masters series weeklong tribute and career celebration this fall: How did it possibly take 17 years for the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame to get to Chuck Berry? If the pioneering singer, songwriter and guitarist, 85, isn't the father of rock 'n' roll, the burden of proof clearly is  on anyone making a case for someone more deserving of the title.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 21, 1985 | ROBERT HILBURN, Times Pop Music Critic
Everyone from Motley Crue head bangers to U2 disciples is familiar with such early rock giants as Elvis Presley, Jerry Lee Lewis and Chuck Berry. But Fats Domino--who is believed to have sold more records than anyone except Elvis in the '50s--may need an introduction to most of today's teen-agers.
NATIONAL
March 10, 2007 | From the Associated Press
Fats Domino broke into soft song as he stepped slowly through his gutted house in the city's flood-ravaged 9th Ward on Friday. Sometimes the Hall of Fame piano man murmured a line of his familiar lyrics. At other moments, he just seemed to be thinking out loud, with a tune. "Why such bad luck fall on me?" the 79-year-old sang, looking out a rear window into the neighborhood where he was born in 1928. In between melodies, he said repeatedly that it was time to come home. "I'm ready," he said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 12, 1988
Latham asks, "Who cares about a rock and roll museum?" Those of us who enjoy the music of Elvis Presley, the Everly Brothers, Fats Domino, Ray Charles, et al--that's who! Thank you, Sen. Kopp, for introducing SB 2283. It will give the rock 'n' roll fans in California a reason to celebrate. HAROLD SEWARD Fresno
ENTERTAINMENT
September 4, 1991 | BETH KLEID, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Drive-In Out: New Jersey's last drive-in theater will have its last picture show tonight. The Route 35 Drive-In in Hazlet Township near Atlantic City will soon be turned into a shopping center that will include a 12-screen theater. The drive-in's last presentations will be films from its early days: "The Girl Can't Help It," 1956, starring Jayne Mansfield, Fats Domino, Little Richard and the Platters, and "The Fly," 1958, starring Vincent Price.
NEWS
August 27, 2007 | Bill Taylor, Bill Taylor is executive director of a 10-year-old musicians' co-op and nonprofit offshoot of the legendary New Orleans nightclub Tipitina's.
Not enough has changed. It's amazing how devastated New Orleans remains. My concern is the effect on the music and culture of the city, traditions passed down organically via neighborhoods, families and homes. It happened naturally, that perpetuation of cultural information. Now that line of cultural transmission has been fractured. Before the storm, Tipitina's Foundation was focused on uplifting the music culture of the city. After the storm, it's about saving that same culture.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 1, 1985 | ROBERT HILBURN
Dave Bartholomew is a born storyteller who loves to reminisce about the excitement of making the hits that established (Antoine) Fats Domino--alongside Elvis Presley, Chuck Berry and Little Richard--as one of the superstars of early rock. "The thing that made Fats' records so good was that people could identify with what he was saying," Bartholomew was explaining. "They were real songs. The best was 'Blue Monday.' That was a hell of a story . . .
ENTERTAINMENT
May 26, 2010 | By Mark Sachs, Los Angeles Times
Ah, to be a single-name star, those anointed ones for whom no further identification is necessary. There's Elvis, there's Marilyn, there's Kobe — and then there's Lemmy. Motörhead's indefatigable frontman, Lemmy Kilmister, is being honored for his long and illustrious music career on VH1 Classic's "Revolver Magazine's Golden Gods Award," airing this week, where he'll also perform a killer version of "Ace of Spades" with Lemmy fans Slash and Dave Grohl. He's also working on a new album and beginning a world tour.
NEWS
August 27, 2007 | Bill Taylor, Bill Taylor is executive director of a 10-year-old musicians' co-op and nonprofit offshoot of the legendary New Orleans nightclub Tipitina's.
Not enough has changed. It's amazing how devastated New Orleans remains. My concern is the effect on the music and culture of the city, traditions passed down organically via neighborhoods, families and homes. It happened naturally, that perpetuation of cultural information. Now that line of cultural transmission has been fractured. Before the storm, Tipitina's Foundation was focused on uplifting the music culture of the city. After the storm, it's about saving that same culture.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 11, 2007 | From a Times staff writer
Fats Domino, whose New Orleans home was destroyed by Hurricane Katrina in 2005, will be presented with copies of 20 of his sales awards during a ceremony Monday in the city's French Quarter, paying tribute to his success in the 1950s and '60s with such hits as "Blueberry Hill" and "Ain't That a Shame." The reproductions will be presented by record label Capitol/EMI, which, not coincidentally, will be releasing on Tuesday a new Domino CD, "Greatest Hits: Walking to New Orleans." And due Sept.
NATIONAL
March 10, 2007 | From the Associated Press
Fats Domino broke into soft song as he stepped slowly through his gutted house in the city's flood-ravaged 9th Ward on Friday. Sometimes the Hall of Fame piano man murmured a line of his familiar lyrics. At other moments, he just seemed to be thinking out loud, with a tune. "Why such bad luck fall on me?" the 79-year-old sang, looking out a rear window into the neighborhood where he was born in 1928. In between melodies, he said repeatedly that it was time to come home. "I'm ready," he said.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 9, 2006 | Steve Hochman, Times Staff Writer
Even the cancellation of closing-day headliner Fats Domino and a midafternoon squall weren't able to dampen the sense of triumph as the 37th New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival came to a rousing conclusion Sunday. After all, it was just a few months ago that the prospect of even holding the renowned event was in doubt given the damage from Hurricane Katrina and the subsequent massive flooding.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 6, 2006 | From the Associated Press
Sitting at a keyboard in the bedroom of his post-Katrina home in the New Orleans suburb of Harvey, La., a smiling Fats Domino joked, laughed and tenderly sang to a handful of close friends this week as he prepared for his appearance Sunday at the closing of the New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Festival. Domino is excited -- even nervous -- about his first performance since Katrina struck last August.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 1996 | ROBERT HILBURN
*** FATS DOMINO AND VARIOUS ARTISTS "That's Fats: A Tribute to Fats Domino" EMI Fats Domino often seems to be the forgotten man of rock 'n' roll. Except for Elvis Presley, he had more Top 40 hits than any other artist from the '50s who has been inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. But the New Orleans singer-pianist rarely tours and is seldom cited as an influence by today's generation of rock musicians. His music, however, still delights.
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