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Fatty Acids

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HEALTH
April 26, 2010 | By Emily Sohn, Special to the Los Angeles Times
So how many omega-3 fatty acids are enough — and how should you get them? That likely depends on your age and your specific health concerns. The United States does not yet have guidelines for DHA or EPA, and consensus among nutrition experts is elusive. But specialty groups, some governmental agencies and individual experts have started to take a stand. For healthy adults without major medical issues, the European Food Safety Agency recommends a daily dose of 250 milligrams of combined EPA and DHA, while the National Heart Foundation of Australia suggests 500 milligrams.
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NEWS
December 10, 2013 | By Mary MacVean
Scientists who looked at hundreds of samples found that organic whole milk offered more of the fatty acids good for the heart than conventional milk. “We were quite surprised to see the magnitude of difference in milk from organic farms,” said Charles Benbrook, lead author of the study and a program leader at the Center for Sustaining Agriculture and Natural Resources at Washington State University. Organic food advocates argue that grass and pasture is healthiest feed for cows.
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NEWS
August 16, 1990 | From Associated Press
Hardened vegetable oil, a main ingredient of margarine and shortening, raises cholesterol levels and may be even worse for people's health than saturated fat, a study concludes. The study, conducted in the Netherlands, raises health questions about fatty acids, the kind of fat that makes margarine and shortening hard so they can be used for baking, frying and spreading and not turn rancid. About a quarter of the fat in a typical stick of margarine is fatty acid.
NEWS
June 20, 2013 | By Russ Parsons
Bob Klein has had his share of food passions. The owner of Oakland's Oliveto restaurant has been consumed by finding the best meat, fish, wine, and, of course, salumi (for years Fra' Mani's Paul Bertolli was his chef). And he was into the whole nose-to-tail thing way early. But now he's found a new love - wheat. And his Community Grains whole-grain pasta is popping up on menus and in stores around Southern California, including Mozza and Whole Foods, as well as online.
HEALTH
April 26, 2010 | By Emily Sohn, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Pregnant women need them for their babies' brains. Kids need them to learn. Adults get healthier hearts from them. The do-it-all nutrients known as omega-3 fatty acids appear to reduce pain in people with rheumatoid arthritis — and may help treat autism, bipolar disorder, depression, Alzheimer's disease, ADHD and prostate cancer. Even dogs and cats need omega-3s to stay healthy. So eat more fish. Take fish oil pills (or their vegetarian counterparts). Start buying fortified foods.
NATIONAL
September 27, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
Three years after New York City banned smoking in restaurants, health officials are talking about prohibiting something they say is almost as bad: trans fatty acids. The city health department unveiled a proposal that would bar cooks at any of the city's 24,600 food-service establishments from using ingredients that contain the artery-clogging substance, commonly listed on food labels as partially hydrogenated oil.
HEALTH
August 22, 2005 | Elena Conis
Fast-growing echium -- known to some gardeners as a pesky weed -- may soon prove to be one of the best plant sources of omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids. Unlike other plant sources of essential fatty acids, such as borage and evening primrose, echium contains a significant amount of stearidonic acid. The acid, which is typically more common in fish oil than plant oils, plays an important role in fatty acid metabolism and might also fight inflammation in the body.
HEALTH
August 4, 2003 | Elena Conis
Conjugated linoleic acid is a bundle of polyunsaturated fatty acids being billed as a weight-loss tool. The substance is found naturally in small amounts in some plants, dairy products and meat -- especially cheese and beef -- and is now included in some diet shakes and nutrition bars.
HEALTH
March 22, 2010 | By Elena Conis, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Coconut milk used to be something that came in a can and was good to have on hand for making pina coladas or Thai curries. These days, coconut milk can also be found in cartons in the milk aisle and in pints in the ice cream section — and as yogurt, coffee creamer and even kefir. Some consumers are turning to coconut-milk products because they're eager for a new dairy alternative, but others are switching to them in the belief that they promote weight loss. Consumers should be aware that the evidence in support of such claims is very slim — and that coconut milk in any form is high in saturated fat, says Ruth Frechman, a spokeswoman for the American Dietetic Assn.
HEALTH
December 5, 2011 | By Elena Conis, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Struggling with the black dog of depression? The supplement aisle abounds with options for people seeking a non-medicinal remedy - but figuring out what works and what doesn't can be a challenge for consumers and experts alike. That's because the data are generally poor, says Dr. Charles Raison, associate professor of psychiatry in the College of Medicine at the University of Arizona in Tucson. There are some exceptions. Hundreds of studies have investigated the effects of omega-3 fatty acids and St. John's wort.
SCIENCE
September 11, 2012 | By Monte Morin, Los Angeles Times
Is there something fishy going on with omega-3 fatty acids? For years, major health and medical organizations have recommended fish oil supplements rich in omega-3s to reduce the threat of heart disease. In Europe, where support is particularly enthusiastic, a doctor's failure to recommend the supplements is viewed by some as bordering on malpractice. But several recent studies have raised questions about the benefits of fish oil, sparking no small amount of confusion. A report published Wednesday in the Journal of the American Medical Assn.
HEALTH
June 2, 2012 | By Mary MacVean, Los Angeles Times
From kitschy gift to kitchen darling, chia is having another 15 minutes of fame. And this time, it's not slathered on clay "pets. " Chia seeds have become popular for their omega-3 fatty acids and fiber content. With their neutral taste, they can be consumed in many ways - now they're even showing up in processed foods such as chips and spreads. Eaten by the Maya and Aztec people, chia seeds have long been reputed to be nutritional powerhouses. "They were basics when we grew up," says Ramiro Arvizu, a chef at La Casita Mexicana in Bell.
NEWS
January 25, 2012 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Rejoice, those who love fried foods: eating them may not put you at higher risk for coronary heart disease--if you're frying those foods in olive or sunflower oils. A study published this week in the British Medical Journal analyzed data on 40,757 Spanish adults age 29 to 69 who were followed for an average 11 years. Free of coronary heart disease at the beginning of the study, they were asked what they ate and what cooking methods they used, then were tracked to see who developed coronary heart disease and who died.
NEWS
December 6, 2011 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
In a Consumer Reports test of fish oil supplements, most passed muster but some didn't measure up on quality. Lab test results on 15 top brands analyzed for amounts of omega-3 fatty acids, disintegration, spoilage and contaminants. Researchers found that at least one sample from six brands didn't meet all the standards set. The results were released Tuesday and are available on newsstands. Over-the-counter fish oil supplements are extremely popular and used to treat heart disease, high blood pressure and psoriasis and a number of other ailments.
HEALTH
December 5, 2011 | By Elena Conis, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Struggling with the black dog of depression? The supplement aisle abounds with options for people seeking a non-medicinal remedy - but figuring out what works and what doesn't can be a challenge for consumers and experts alike. That's because the data are generally poor, says Dr. Charles Raison, associate professor of psychiatry in the College of Medicine at the University of Arizona in Tucson. There are some exceptions. Hundreds of studies have investigated the effects of omega-3 fatty acids and St. John's wort.
NEWS
February 11, 2011 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times
A healthy intake of omega-3 fatty acids, found in fish and fish oil supplements, has been shown to protect against retinopathy, a leading cause of blindness, particularly among people with diabetes. Now researchers have clarified how fish oil helps. Previously, researchers from Children's Hospital Boston showed that mice fed a diet rich in omega-3s had less abnormal blood-vessel growth in the retina and less of an inflammatory response compared with mice fed omega-6 fatty acids, a less beneficial fatty acid.
SCIENCE
March 27, 2006 | Denise Gellene, Times Staff Writer
If a new kind of pork makes it to the dinner table, healthful eaters worried about fat and heart disease might finally be free to, well, pig out. Scientists using genetic engineering techniques have produced pigs rich in omega-3 fatty acids -- a kind of healthful fat abundant in fish but not naturally found in meat. The omega-3 fatty acids are believed to offer some protection against heart attacks, and federal nutrition guidelines recommend adults include them in their daily diets.
HEALTH
June 2, 2012 | By Mary MacVean, Los Angeles Times
From kitschy gift to kitchen darling, chia is having another 15 minutes of fame. And this time, it's not slathered on clay "pets. " Chia seeds have become popular for their omega-3 fatty acids and fiber content. With their neutral taste, they can be consumed in many ways - now they're even showing up in processed foods such as chips and spreads. Eaten by the Maya and Aztec people, chia seeds have long been reputed to be nutritional powerhouses. "They were basics when we grew up," says Ramiro Arvizu, a chef at La Casita Mexicana in Bell.
HEALTH
December 13, 2010
The Institute of Medicine recommends 1,100 milligrams of omega-3 fatty acids per day for women and 1,600 mg for men. Here's a look at the amounts and types of omega-3s found in selected foods: FoodAmount & Type of omega-3s 3 ounces of salmon1,000-1,500 mg of EPA and DHA 3 ounces of sardines1,000-1,500 mg of EPA and DHA 1 Smart Balance Omega-3 Grade A Natural Large Egg160 mg of ALA, plus 32 mg of DHA 1 Land O Lakes Omega-3...
NEWS
December 2, 2010 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times
Omega-3 fatty acids can be found in high concentrations in the retina of the eye, leading to speculation that adequate levels of the substance may be important in preventing some diseases of the eye. Animal studies also suggest that omega-3s, found mostly in seafood, protect against eye diseases. A new study adds more evidence, finding that people who consume a lot of fish and shellfish have lower rates of age-related macular degeneration. The condition is the most common cause of blindness in the United States.
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