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Fawn Hall

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NEWS
June 8, 1987 | From a Times Staff Writer
Leading off the witnesses today in the sixth week of congressional hearings on the Iran- contra affair will be Bretton Sciaroni, whose controversial legal opinion said that the covert activities of Lt. Col. Oliver L. North were within the law, and Fawn Hall, the secretary who reportedly helped North shred documents shortly before he was fired from his National Security Council job.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 9, 1999
I see where the Treasury Department shredded some important documents (Dec. 7). Are Ollie North and Fawn Hall back in government work? HARLAN McWHORTER Rialto
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NEWS
August 19, 1987 | Marylouise Oates
America hasn't seen the last of Fawn Hall--one of Hollywood's biggest agents is going to see to that. "She's got star quality," said William Morris co-chair Norman Brokaw, who said that yes, Hall had just been signed by his agency for exclusive representation. The blonde beauty will be personally represented by Ron Yatter, a William Morris senior v.p. who also represents Diana Ross, and, Brokaw said, he and Yatter "will explore all possibilities for her."
NEWS
August 27, 1995 | LAURA MYERS, ASSOCIATED PRESS
"There's a mastodon in my back yard." That's what the woman said when she telephoned the Smithsonian Institution, wondering if scientists could excavate the Ice Age creature. Then there are the folks who called asking if the Great Wall of China was on exhibit, or how about the "original Bible." You know, 10 Commandments. Tablets. Moses. Some of the hundreds of calls the Smithsonian fields each day involve age-old questions--what's the name of the man who invented the wheel?
NEWS
October 21, 1987 | United Press International
Former White House secretary Fawn Hall, who shredded reams of documents about the Iran- contra scandal, was given a $10 ticket for eating a banana in a subway station, a Metro spokesman said today. The spokesman said Hall was eating the banana on the platform of the Metro Center station--the city's busiest--just before noon Tuesday and refused to stop. Eating in subway stations is illegal. Hall says she will appeal the fine.
NEWS
April 9, 1988 | Associated Press
Fawn Hall, who made her television debut testifying about former boss Oliver L. North before a Senate committee investigating the Iran-Contra affair, will be co-host of a network special that producers hope is an upscale version of "The Lifestyles of the Rich and Famous." Hall was chosen "because she is very spontaneous and has a presence that is indicative she can handle this kind of assignment with zest and energy," Gary Pudney, a ABC television vice president for specials, said Friday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 21, 1989 | AMY LOUISE KAZMIN, Times Staff Writer
Secretaries are rarely considered big draws for fund-raisers. But state Republican Chairman Frank Visco knows that Fawn Hall is no ordinary secretary. That's why he invited the former secretary to Lt. Col. Oliver L. North to a fund-raiser Saturday for a homeless shelter at the edge of the Mojave Desert. "Most people have the wrong impression of her. She is a caring person . . . the type of person who will be of benefit to this country in the long run," said Visco, a Lancaster businessman.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 19, 1988 | JAY SHARBUTT, Times Staff Writer
It is a strange world. One year you talk to senators in Washington about the Iran-Contra affair. Next year, you're at a cow-dung hut in Kenya, talking to a European heiress wed to a Masai warrior. For Fawn Hall, that is what life in Washington has led to. Her fame as the attractive, feisty former secretary to Marine Lt. Col. Oliver North has gotten her a major talent agent and all manner of offers, including TV anchoring.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 4, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Fawn Hall, introduced to America's television viewers during the Iran-Contra affair, will be taking some viewers to the beach this spring. Hall, who was Oliver L. North's secretary when he was an aide at the National Security Council, was in Pittsburgh on Tuesday doing pre-production work for KDKA-TV's "Evening Magazine" program. Hall's assignment is to report on three beach resorts favored by Pittsburgh vacationers. The segments, featuring Ocean City, Md., Myrtle Beach, S.C.
NEWS
June 10, 1987 | Associated Press
Security clearances held by Fawn Hall, the former secretary to Lt. Col. Oliver L. North, are under review and she has not handled classified information since leaving the White House, the Navy said Tuesday. Hall returned to the Pentagon to work for the Navy after the Iran- contra story broke last November and North was fired from his position on the National Security Council staff by President Reagan.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 4, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Fawn Hall, introduced to America's television viewers during the Iran-Contra affair, will be taking some viewers to the beach this spring. Hall, who was Oliver L. North's secretary when he was an aide at the National Security Council, was in Pittsburgh on Tuesday doing pre-production work for KDKA-TV's "Evening Magazine" program. Hall's assignment is to report on three beach resorts favored by Pittsburgh vacationers. The segments, featuring Ocean City, Md., Myrtle Beach, S.C.
NEWS
March 20, 1990 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Former National Security Adviser John M. Poindexter smiles rarely and takes notes often at his Iran-Contra trial. Because he has not testified yet, the jury must rely a good deal on its mental snapshots of his image as he sits at a table opposite them every day. But that image poses a riddle. The balding retired rear admiral has grown a mustache since his days in the Ronald Reagan Administration as Oliver L. North's boss. When he takes off his glasses, the mustache softens his manner.
NEWS
March 15, 1990 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The starched military bearing of witness Oliver L. North wilted for a telling moment under relentless questioning Wednesday as he acknowledged his lies to Congress and stated he had already demonstrated his remorse to the world. On his fourth and final day as a reluctant witness in the Iran-Contra trial of former National Security Adviser John M. Poindexter, North faced a barrage of sharp and unfriendly questions from both special prosecutor Dan K. Webb and defense attorney Richard W. Beckler.
NEWS
June 4, 1989 | From the Washington Post
Former White House secretary Fawn Hall, questioned as part of an extensive federal drug investigation in the Georgetown area, has told the Drug Enforcement Administration that she used cocaine many times during a three-year period when she held sensitive jobs on the National Security Council staff and at the Pentagon, according to sources. However, her attorney, Plato Cacheris, Friday denied that Hall had admitted frequent use of cocaine. Hall was interviewed by a DEA agent about her knowledge of Georgetown drug dealing on Aug. 7, 1987--two months after she gained national prominence by testifying at the congressional Iran-Contra hearings about her work as personal secretary to Oliver L. North when he was an NSC aide, the sources said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 21, 1989 | AMY LOUISE KAZMIN, Times Staff Writer
Secretaries are rarely considered big draws for fund-raisers. But state Republican Chairman Frank Visco knows that Fawn Hall is no ordinary secretary. That's why he invited the former secretary to Lt. Col. Oliver L. North to a fund-raiser Saturday for a homeless shelter at the edge of the Mojave Desert. "Most people have the wrong impression of her. She is a caring person . . . the type of person who will be of benefit to this country in the long run," said Visco, a Lancaster businessman.
NEWS
May 16, 1987 | From Times Wire Services
Fawn Hall, the former White House secretary who told prosecutors that she helped Lt. Col. Oliver L. North shred documents when the Iran- contra affair was unraveling, testified Friday before a special federal grand jury. The proceedings at the U.S. Courthouse were closed to the public, and neither Hall nor her attorney would comment after a hearing that lasted for more than two hours.
NEWS
June 9, 1987 | Associated Press
Fawn Hall testified today that she never considered her shredding, altering and removing sensitive documents from Lt. Col. Oliver L. North's files to be part of a cover-up as the Iran- contra scandal unraveled last fall. "I use the word protect, " she said. In occasionally contentious testimony at the end of the first, six-week phase of Congress' televised hearings, Hall at one point said her activity was justified because "sometimes you have to go above the written law."
NEWS
April 11, 1989 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, Times Staff Writer
Lt. Col. Oliver L. North admitted Monday that he and his former secretary removed 168 sensitive documents from the files of the National Security Council when the Iran-Contra scandal surfaced, but he said that his purpose was to "protect myself." North, in his third day as a witness at his trial, said also that it had been stupid of him to accept the installation of a $13,800 home security system without paying for it and to concoct two phony letters to cover up the gratuity. Under cross-examination by prosecutor John W. Keker, the retired Marine officer and former White House aide said that he could have paid for the electronic system himself, noting that for years he has maintained a cash fund of about $15,000 in a closet at home.
NEWS
March 24, 1989 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, Times Staff Writer
Former White House secretary Fawn Hall, who wept repeatedly on the witness stand Thursday, said she was "very upset" by the 1986 firing of her boss, Lt. Col. Oliver L. North, and by "very confusing" recollections of altering and removing sensitive documents in the Iran-Contra scandal. As she testified a second and final day at North's federal court trial, Hall first broke down when she was pressed by prosecutor John W.
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