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Fay Vincent

SPORTS
October 9, 1990 | Associated Press
Fay Vincent said Monday the filing of a lawsuit by George Steinbrenner's attorney challenging the transcript of testimony before the commissioner was an "imbecilic act." The suit was filed last week against the firm that handled the transcript of Steinbrenner's hearing. It contends the testimony was changed to make Steinbrenner look bad.
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SPORTS
September 11, 1990 | TOM VERDUCCI, NEWSDAY
A question and answer session with baseball commissioner Fay Vincent: Q: Has this job been what you thought it would be? Vincent: It's much better than I ever dreamed, in a sense that it's the most wonderful way to spend time that I could ever have imagined. If you have to get up in the morning and go to work, this is the job that you want. It's better than not working, because I don't have to work. If I didn't want to work, I wouldn't be here. It's a terrific amount of fun.
SPORTS
September 9, 1990 | RONALD BLUM, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Friday, Sept. 1, 1989. The start of a long, lazy Labor Day weekend. Fay Vincent was sitting on the sundeck of his Cape Cod summer home when the phone rang about 3 p.m. Bobby Brown, the American League president, was on the line with word that Bart Giamatti was stricken with a heart attack. Within an hour Vincent would learn -- by radio -- that his friend and boss, the baseball commissioner, was dead.
SPORTS
September 5, 1990 | From Associated Press
A New York Yankee executive sued Fay Vincent in federal court Tuesday, accusing the commissioner of trying to run him and George Steinbrenner out of baseball. Leonard L. Kleinman, executive vice president and chief operating executive of the Yankees, made the allegation in a $22-million suit against Vincent and John M. Dowd, the commissioner's special counsel who directed an investigation of Steinbrenner's dealings with gambler Howard Spira.
SPORTS
July 19, 1990 | TOM VERDUCCI, NEWSDAY
Baseball Commissioner Fay Vincent, clearly irritated that a transcript of his hearing with George Steinbrenner was made public, strongly implied that Steinbrenner's camp provided the leak. Vincent termed the maneuver "a hardball tactic." "I'm disappointed," Vincent said, when reached at his Cape Cod, Mass., vacation home. "It's unfortunate. It was not intended to be made public. I'm sorry that it was done. "I will say that it was not done by anyone in my office or anyone under my control.
SPORTS
June 7, 1990 | JIM MURRAY
No one knows whether Kenesaw Mountain Landis, the first commissioner of the game, loved baseball. Could he have named the starting lineup of the 1929 Philadelphia Athletics, complete with batting averages, strikeouts per inning and walks per game? Would he have known how Pie Traynor got his nickname? Did he collect player cards as a kid? Did he even keep score at the games? Did he think of a double play as 6-4-3? Was he even up on the infield-fly rule?
SPORTS
March 26, 1990 | MIKE LITTWIN, THE BALTIMORE SUN
The funniest line ever written about a baseball commissioner came at the expense, predictably, of Bowie Kuhn, of whom it was said during the strike of 1981, "This would never have happened if Bowie Kuhn had been alive today." The unspoken reference was to Kenesaw Mountain Landis, the hanging judge turned commissioner, who is generally credited with having whipped baseball into shape after the Black Sox gambling crisis, if in much the same way that Mussolini made the trains run on time.
SPORTS
March 10, 1990
I gasped when I heard that Fay Vincent, the baseball commissioner, was to allow Steve Howe to pitch again, after Howe's six suspensions for drug and alcohol abuse. Well, now I reserve opinion. I'm hoping Vincent was magnanimous in realizing that sometimes drug addicts need professional treatments, love and additional chances more than they need to be punished as outcasts. If Vincent can ingratiate himself to a six-time failure, maybe we can expect the commissioner to advocate the return to baseball of Pete Rose, along with Rose's induction into the Hall of Fame.
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