Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsFda
IN THE NEWS

Fda

NEWS
August 2, 2011 | By Andrew Seidman
A coalition of nearly 30 organizations in the animal agriculture industry sent a letter to the heads of the House and Senate on Tuesday, asking lawmakers not to intervene as the Food and Drug Administration considers whether to approve genetically engineered salmon as food. The letter comes more than a month after the House approved an amendment, by voice acclamation, to an appropriations bill that would strip the FDA of funding to study the salmon. On July 15, members of the House and Senate sent letters to the FDA asking it to abandon its consideration of modified salmon as food, and threatened to propose legislation to bar further study of the fish if the agency does not comply.
Advertisement
NEWS
September 14, 2010
The Food and Drug Administration released information Tuesday suggesting it's unimpressed by a weight-loss medication under development by Arena Pharmaceuticals Inc. and casting doubt on the drug's eventual approval. An FDA advisory committee is scheduled to meet Thursday and vote on whether to recommend approval of the drug, lorcaserin. But in documents released Tuesday in advance of the meeting, the FDA noted that studies on lorcaserin showed the average weight loss while taking the drug was not significantly different than the average weight loss among people taking a placebo.
NEWS
January 7, 2011 | By Amina Khan, Los Angeles Times
By late March, tobacco companies will have to reveal to the Food and Drug Administration what sorts of new additives they've recently put in their products. But the ruling doesn't apply to electronic cigarettes, whose makers are locked in legal battle with the FDA. Meanwhile, the e-cigs are starting to gain a pop-culture foothold – in the fall film “The Tourist,” actor Johnny Depp extols the devices’ virtues to Angelina Jolie, and Katherine Heigl showed up recently on the "Late Show with David Letterman" smoking the e-cigarette indoors.
NEWS
January 10, 2013 | By Melissa Healy
The Food and Drug Administration, citing safety concerns, has called on manufacturers of the drug Ambien and its generic equivalents to lower the standard dosages of the insomnia drug now sold, and it is warning physicians that at current dosages, some patients are at risk of impairment in the morning. The agency cited new data showing that the morning after taking the medication, some patients continued to have blood levels of zolpidem, the active ingredient in Ambien, that could disrupt driving and other activities that require alertness.
NEWS
December 27, 2010 | By Mary Forgione, For the Los Angeles Times
Remoxy may not have the name recognition of Percocet, but its makers say it has something Percocet and similar drugs don't have -- little potential for addiction. They've asked, again, that the FDA approve Remoxy. Like Percocet, Remoxy contains oxycodone, an opiate that Americans like quite a bit. Unlike other formulations, however, Remoxy employs a special controlled-release formula designed to limit its abuse. The National Institute on Drug Abuse reports that of 7 million Americans abusing prescription drugs in 2009, 5.3 million were abusing pain relievers.
BUSINESS
February 12, 2014 | By Ricardo Lopez
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration is investigating the illnesses of children in three states in recent months that have been linked to Uncle Ben's infused rice served in schools. The cluster of illnesses have affected children in Texas, Illinois and North Dakota. At three schools in Katy, Texas, 34 students and four teachers experienced skin reactions, burning, headaches and nausea last week after eating Uncle Ben's "Mexican flavor" infused rice.  The symptoms lasted about 90 minutes, officials said.  Similar reactions were reported at an Illinois school in December and a daycare center in North Dakota in October.  Mars Foodservices, which produces the product, has recalled 5- and 25-pound bags of various rice products primarily sold to schools, restaurants, hospitals and other commercial establishments.
NEWS
June 21, 2011 | By Marissa Cevallos, HealthKey / For the Booster Shots blog
The Food and Drug Administration says it could use an international helping hand in testing the influx of imported drugs and food.  Acknowledging the monitoring difficulties inherent in a global economy, the agency said in an announcement Monday that it needs to transform the way it protects the nation's food and drug supply, teaming up with other agencies around the world to ensure quality and safety of the products it regulates. “Global production of FDA-regulated goods has exploded over the past ten years.  In addition to an increase in imported finished products, manufacturers increasingly use imported materials and ingredients in their U.S. production facilities, making the distinction between domestic and imported products obsolete,” Commissioner of Food and Drugs Margaret A. Hamburg said in the announcement.
NEWS
June 23, 2011 | By Marissa Cevallos, HealthKey / For the Booster Shots blog
The Food and Drug Administration is essentially telling U.S. consumers worried about silicone breast implants: “Told you so.” But in releasing new research backing up its 2006 decision to allow the implants back onto the market, the agency also reminds women, in a way, that they have only two choices — silicone or saline. So let’s take a look at those options. Until 2006, silicone implants had been under a 14-year ban by the FDA because of concerns that leaks or ruptures could increase the risk of certain diseases, including breast cancer and connective tissue diseases.
NEWS
June 14, 2011 | By Marissa Cevallos, HealthKey / For the Booster Shots blog
FDA to Kellogg: One of your facilities is contaminated with listeria. Clean it up.  That’s the gist of a warning letter, dated June 7, the Food and Drug Administration sent to Kellogg after a February inspection of a cookie plant found Listeria monocytogenes , the bacteria that causes the food poisoning listeriosis . The Augusta, Ga. plant makes various Keebler and Famous Amos cookies. The agency didn’t find the pathogen in any Kellogg foods, but on and around conveyor belts in the production line.
OPINION
September 11, 2010
While the outrage over salmonella-tainted eggs was rightly focused on Congress' failure to pass long-overdue food safety legislation and the Food and Drug Administration's refusal to require vaccination of chickens, something equally appalling but less noticed had been going on at the two Iowa egg farms involved. Even though U.S. Department of Agriculture employees worked full time at both filthy facilities, there was no word from them about the rodents, maggots and piles of leaking manure.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|