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NEWS
June 14, 2011 | By Marissa Cevallos, HealthKey / For the Booster Shots blog
FDA to Kellogg: One of your facilities is contaminated with listeria. Clean it up.  That’s the gist of a warning letter, dated June 7, the Food and Drug Administration sent to Kellogg after a February inspection of a cookie plant found Listeria monocytogenes , the bacteria that causes the food poisoning listeriosis . The Augusta, Ga. plant makes various Keebler and Famous Amos cookies. The agency didn’t find the pathogen in any Kellogg foods, but on and around conveyor belts in the production line.
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NEWS
August 2, 2011 | By Andrew Seidman
A coalition of nearly 30 organizations in the animal agriculture industry sent a letter to the heads of the House and Senate on Tuesday, asking lawmakers not to intervene as the Food and Drug Administration considers whether to approve genetically engineered salmon as food. The letter comes more than a month after the House approved an amendment, by voice acclamation, to an appropriations bill that would strip the FDA of funding to study the salmon. On July 15, members of the House and Senate sent letters to the FDA asking it to abandon its consideration of modified salmon as food, and threatened to propose legislation to bar further study of the fish if the agency does not comply.
BUSINESS
February 2, 2012 | By Matt Stevens
Trace levels of the fungicide carbendazim were discovered in domestic orange juice samples, the Food and Drug Administration reported Thursday. But the FDA said the levels pose no safety risk, and the orange juice will not be recalled. FDA spokeswoman Siobhan DeLancey said that most of the samples taken were from concentrated products that will be blended down into the orange juice consumers drink, so the low levels of carbendazim will almost disappear. “We didn't have any evidence to indicate that the product on the market was any safety problem at all,” DeLancey said.
NEWS
January 4, 2012 | By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times / for the Booster Shots blog
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration prohibited some unapproved uses of antibiotics in livestock on Wednesday. Farmers will no longer be able to administer a class of antibiotics called cephalosporins to cattle, pigs, chicken and turkeys in unapproved doses or frequencies, or as a means of preventing disease, the agency said. Also prohibited: using drugs not originally intended for use in livestock. Some limited extra-label use will still be permitted, including prescription drugs in less-commonly eaten animals such as rabbits and ducks.
NEWS
September 14, 2010
The Food and Drug Administration released information Tuesday suggesting it's unimpressed by a weight-loss medication under development by Arena Pharmaceuticals Inc. and casting doubt on the drug's eventual approval. An FDA advisory committee is scheduled to meet Thursday and vote on whether to recommend approval of the drug, lorcaserin. But in documents released Tuesday in advance of the meeting, the FDA noted that studies on lorcaserin showed the average weight loss while taking the drug was not significantly different than the average weight loss among people taking a placebo.
NEWS
March 21, 2013 | By Monte Morin
La Preferida Inc. is voluntarily recalling 56,808 29-ounce cans of La Preferida Whole Pinto Beans, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration announced Thursday. "The manufacturer's preliminary inspection indicates 420 cans may not have been fully processed, which could result in product contamination by spoilage organisms or by pathogens, which could lead to illness if consumed," the FDA said. "To date, there have been no reported injuries or adverse events associated with the consumption of this product.
SCIENCE
June 18, 2013 | By Melissa Healy
The Food and Drug Administration says it is investigating the unexplained deaths of two patients in the wake of receiving intramuscular injections of the antipsychotic medication Zyprexa (generic name olanzapine). The patients died three to four days after receiving appropriate doses of Zyprexa Relprevv, which is designed to release slowly into the blood over two to four weeks and provide regular dosing for adults with schizophrenia. The FDA says the deaths occurred well after the three-to-four-hour window following injection during which patients should be monitored in a physician's office for a potentially deadly complication called post-injection delirium sedation syndrome (PDSS)
NEWS
January 7, 2011 | By Amina Khan, Los Angeles Times
By late March, tobacco companies will have to reveal to the Food and Drug Administration what sorts of new additives they've recently put in their products. But the ruling doesn't apply to electronic cigarettes, whose makers are locked in legal battle with the FDA. Meanwhile, the e-cigs are starting to gain a pop-culture foothold – in the fall film “The Tourist,” actor Johnny Depp extols the devices’ virtues to Angelina Jolie, and Katherine Heigl showed up recently on the "Late Show with David Letterman" smoking the e-cigarette indoors.
NEWS
December 27, 2010 | By Mary Forgione, For the Los Angeles Times
Remoxy may not have the name recognition of Percocet, but its makers say it has something Percocet and similar drugs don't have -- little potential for addiction. They've asked, again, that the FDA approve Remoxy. Like Percocet, Remoxy contains oxycodone, an opiate that Americans like quite a bit. Unlike other formulations, however, Remoxy employs a special controlled-release formula designed to limit its abuse. The National Institute on Drug Abuse reports that of 7 million Americans abusing prescription drugs in 2009, 5.3 million were abusing pain relievers.
BUSINESS
February 12, 2014 | By Ricardo Lopez
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration is investigating the illnesses of children in three states in recent months that have been linked to Uncle Ben's infused rice served in schools. The cluster of illnesses have affected children in Texas, Illinois and North Dakota. At three schools in Katy, Texas, 34 students and four teachers experienced skin reactions, burning, headaches and nausea last week after eating Uncle Ben's "Mexican flavor" infused rice.  The symptoms lasted about 90 minutes, officials said.  Similar reactions were reported at an Illinois school in December and a daycare center in North Dakota in October.  Mars Foodservices, which produces the product, has recalled 5- and 25-pound bags of various rice products primarily sold to schools, restaurants, hospitals and other commercial establishments.
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