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NEWS
March 2, 2011 | By Julie Deardorff, Chicago Tribune
The Food and Drug Administration plans to remove some unapproved prescription cough, cold and allergy medicines now sitting on store shelves, the agency announced Wednesday. The products, which may be inappropriately labeled for use by infants and young children, could pose an unnecessary risk because they haven't been tested for safety and efficacy, the FDA said. Some may have risky ingredients, and others -- marketed as 'timed release' -- may release active ingredients too slowly, too quickly or inconsistently.
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NEWS
November 22, 2011 | By Amina Khan, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
The Food and Drug Administration has approved Abbott Laboratories' ESA test for Chagas disease, which could be a useful tool in protecting the nation's blood supply from contamination. Chagas disease is caused by a parasite, Trypanosoma cruzi, which can be found in the triatomine bug's feces. The bug, which flourishes in parts of Latin America (including Mexico), often lives in the walls of mud, thatch or adobe huts and comes out at night to feed on sleeping humans, according to the Mayo Clinic.
NEWS
November 22, 2010 | By Mary Forgione, For the Los Angeles Times
Medical innovation saves lives, but each drug and device requires careful scrutiny by the Federal Drug Administration before being deemed safe to market. But does the federal agency take too long in its approval process? Dr. Josh Makower says yes. The consulting professor of medicine at Stanford University co-wrote a study of 200 medical technology companies and reports his findings in this column by Nicole Brochu of the South Florida Sun Sentinel . The column reads in part: "For low- and moderate-risk devices, the process to navigate the FDA took companies on average three months to two years longer for a green light than it did for a similar approval from European regulators.
BUSINESS
February 12, 2014 | By Ricardo Lopez
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration is investigating the illnesses of children in three states in recent months that have been linked to Uncle Ben's infused rice served in schools. The cluster of illnesses have affected children in Texas, Illinois and North Dakota. At three schools in Katy, Texas, 34 students and four teachers experienced skin reactions, burning, headaches and nausea last week after eating Uncle Ben's "Mexican flavor" infused rice.  The symptoms lasted about 90 minutes, officials said.  Similar reactions were reported at an Illinois school in December and a daycare center in North Dakota in October.  Mars Foodservices, which produces the product, has recalled 5- and 25-pound bags of various rice products primarily sold to schools, restaurants, hospitals and other commercial establishments.
NEWS
June 14, 2011 | By Marissa Cevallos, HealthKey / For the Booster Shots blog
FDA to Kellogg: One of your facilities is contaminated with listeria. Clean it up.  That’s the gist of a warning letter, dated June 7, the Food and Drug Administration sent to Kellogg after a February inspection of a cookie plant found Listeria monocytogenes , the bacteria that causes the food poisoning listeriosis . The Augusta, Ga. plant makes various Keebler and Famous Amos cookies. The agency didn’t find the pathogen in any Kellogg foods, but on and around conveyor belts in the production line.
NEWS
November 16, 2012 | By Jon Bardin
The Food and Drug Administrationon Friday posted additional adverse event reports connecting two more energy drinks to 53 illnesses, five deaths and two chronic disabilities. The new information comes on the heels of an FDA announcement linking the extremely popular 5-Hour Energy shots to 92 sicknesses and 13 deaths. The latest reports do not prove that the drinks -- Monster Energy and Rockstar Energy -- caused the illnesses or deaths, but rather register the fact that a doctor, family member, or patient believes the product might have played a role.
NEWS
August 2, 2011 | By Andrew Seidman
A coalition of nearly 30 organizations in the animal agriculture industry sent a letter to the heads of the House and Senate on Tuesday, asking lawmakers not to intervene as the Food and Drug Administration considers whether to approve genetically engineered salmon as food. The letter comes more than a month after the House approved an amendment, by voice acclamation, to an appropriations bill that would strip the FDA of funding to study the salmon. On July 15, members of the House and Senate sent letters to the FDA asking it to abandon its consideration of modified salmon as food, and threatened to propose legislation to bar further study of the fish if the agency does not comply.
BUSINESS
February 2, 2012 | By Matt Stevens
Trace levels of the fungicide carbendazim were discovered in domestic orange juice samples, the Food and Drug Administration reported Thursday. But the FDA said the levels pose no safety risk, and the orange juice will not be recalled. FDA spokeswoman Siobhan DeLancey said that most of the samples taken were from concentrated products that will be blended down into the orange juice consumers drink, so the low levels of carbendazim will almost disappear. “We didn't have any evidence to indicate that the product on the market was any safety problem at all,” DeLancey said.
NEWS
September 14, 2010
The Food and Drug Administration released information Tuesday suggesting it's unimpressed by a weight-loss medication under development by Arena Pharmaceuticals Inc. and casting doubt on the drug's eventual approval. An FDA advisory committee is scheduled to meet Thursday and vote on whether to recommend approval of the drug, lorcaserin. But in documents released Tuesday in advance of the meeting, the FDA noted that studies on lorcaserin showed the average weight loss while taking the drug was not significantly different than the average weight loss among people taking a placebo.
BUSINESS
January 11, 2012 | Bloomberg News
The U.S. temporarily halted shipments of imported orange juice from all countries and said it would destroy or ban products containing even low levels of a banned fungicide. The imports will be held while they're tested and may be sold if levels are below trace amounts, the Food and Drug Administration said Wednesday. The fungicide, linked in studies to a higher risk of liver tumors in animals, was found in trace amounts last month in products from Brazil, which produces almost 1 in 6 glasses of orange juice consumed in the U.S., according to CitrusBR, an export industry association.
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