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OPINION
September 11, 2010
While the outrage over salmonella-tainted eggs was rightly focused on Congress' failure to pass long-overdue food safety legislation and the Food and Drug Administration's refusal to require vaccination of chickens, something equally appalling but less noticed had been going on at the two Iowa egg farms involved. Even though U.S. Department of Agriculture employees worked full time at both filthy facilities, there was no word from them about the rodents, maggots and piles of leaking manure.
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NEWS
July 29, 2010
The Food and Drug Administration Thursday warned physicians and patients that the intravenous antibiotic Cubicin can cause life-threatening eosinophilic pneumonia, which is marked by the accumulation of a type of white blood cells called eosinophils in the lungs. Symptoms include fever, cough, shortness of breath and difficulty breathing. Cubicin is the brand name for the generic drug daptomycin, sold by Cubist Pharmaceuticals Inc. It was approved in September 2003 for treating serious skin infections and in 2006 to treat bloodstream infections.
NEWS
December 3, 2010 | By Mary Forgione, For the Los Angeles Times
Invisible braces sound perfect, especially if you're an adult trying to look and act your age. But the FDA says Invisalign, which makes one type of invisible braces, failed to report information on side-effects in patients. Here's the Associated Press story detailing some patients' complaints about allergic reactions to the devices  and the FDA advisory letter . And, of course, the response from Invisalign maker Align Technology Inc. in San Jose. None of this is to say that crooked teeth should stay crooked.
NEWS
February 8, 2011 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
The Food and Drug Administration Tuesday approved the first pacemaker that is specifically designed for use in a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) environment. MRIs are an increasingly used tool for diagnosing ailments because they provide precise, detailed pictures of internal organs and soft tissues, but they generate powerful magnetic fields, as much as 30,000 times more powerful than the Earth's own magnetic field. That powerful field can interfere with a normal pacemaker's operation, damage its components, cause the pacemaker or its leads to become dislodged, or interfere with its ability to capture a signal from the heart.
BUSINESS
December 13, 2011 | Reuters
U.S. health regulators sent warning letters to eight California surgical centers and a marketing firm for providing misleading information while advertising Allergan Inc.'s Lap-Band, a device used to treat obesity. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration said billboards and advertising inserts used by the surgical centers and the marketing firm 1-800-GET-THIN fail to provide required risk information, including warnings, precautions and possible side effects. The FDA issued warning letters to Bakersfield Surgery Institute Inc, Beverly Hills Surgery Center, Palmdale Ambulatory Center, Valley Surgical Center, Top Surgeons, Valencia Ambulatory Center, Cosmopolitan Plastic & Reconstructive Surgery and San Diego Ambulatory Center.
NEWS
March 2, 2011 | By Julie Deardorff, Chicago Tribune
The Food and Drug Administration plans to remove some unapproved prescription cough, cold and allergy medicines now sitting on store shelves, the agency announced Wednesday. The products, which may be inappropriately labeled for use by infants and young children, could pose an unnecessary risk because they haven't been tested for safety and efficacy, the FDA said. Some may have risky ingredients, and others -- marketed as 'timed release' -- may release active ingredients too slowly, too quickly or inconsistently.
NEWS
August 2, 2011 | By Andrew Seidman
A coalition of nearly 30 organizations in the animal agriculture industry sent a letter to the heads of the House and Senate on Tuesday, asking lawmakers not to intervene as the Food and Drug Administration considers whether to approve genetically engineered salmon as food. The letter comes more than a month after the House approved an amendment, by voice acclamation, to an appropriations bill that would strip the FDA of funding to study the salmon. On July 15, members of the House and Senate sent letters to the FDA asking it to abandon its consideration of modified salmon as food, and threatened to propose legislation to bar further study of the fish if the agency does not comply.
BUSINESS
February 2, 2012 | By Matt Stevens
Trace levels of the fungicide carbendazim were discovered in domestic orange juice samples, the Food and Drug Administration reported Thursday. But the FDA said the levels pose no safety risk, and the orange juice will not be recalled. FDA spokeswoman Siobhan DeLancey said that most of the samples taken were from concentrated products that will be blended down into the orange juice consumers drink, so the low levels of carbendazim will almost disappear. “We didn't have any evidence to indicate that the product on the market was any safety problem at all,” DeLancey said.
SCIENCE
October 24, 2013 | By Melissa Healy
The Food and Drug Administration has laid out a roadmap for greater strictures on the prescribing and dispensing of hydrocodone and analgesics that contain it. The move is the latest in a chain of actions taken by the FDA and other agencies to address a burgeoning U.S. crisis of addiction to opioid painkillers. Under a plan announced by the FDA on Thursday afternoon, products containing the opioid painkiller hydrocodone, including combination analgesics such as Vicodin (which mixes hydrocodone with acetaminophen)
NEWS
April 9, 2013 | By Melissa Healy
The Food and Drug Administration on Monday approved a drug to treat the severe nausea and vomiting that some women experience during early pregnancy. The Canadian-made medication will be marketed as Diclegis. It is the only prescription medication approved for pregnant women experiencing "morning sickness" that does not go away with a bland diet of small meals that are low in fat. Diclegis was once known and marketed in the United States as Bendectin and taken by as many as one in 10 pregnant women.
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