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SCIENCE
June 18, 2013 | By Melissa Healy
The Food and Drug Administration says it is investigating the unexplained deaths of two patients in the wake of receiving intramuscular injections of the antipsychotic medication Zyprexa (generic name olanzapine). The patients died three to four days after receiving appropriate doses of Zyprexa Relprevv, which is designed to release slowly into the blood over two to four weeks and provide regular dosing for adults with schizophrenia. The FDA says the deaths occurred well after the three-to-four-hour window following injection during which patients should be monitored in a physician's office for a potentially deadly complication called post-injection delirium sedation syndrome (PDSS)
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BUSINESS
December 13, 2011 | Reuters
U.S. health regulators sent warning letters to eight California surgical centers and a marketing firm for providing misleading information while advertising Allergan Inc.'s Lap-Band, a device used to treat obesity. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration said billboards and advertising inserts used by the surgical centers and the marketing firm 1-800-GET-THIN fail to provide required risk information, including warnings, precautions and possible side effects. The FDA issued warning letters to Bakersfield Surgery Institute Inc, Beverly Hills Surgery Center, Palmdale Ambulatory Center, Valley Surgical Center, Top Surgeons, Valencia Ambulatory Center, Cosmopolitan Plastic & Reconstructive Surgery and San Diego Ambulatory Center.
NEWS
March 2, 2011 | By Julie Deardorff, Chicago Tribune
The Food and Drug Administration plans to remove some unapproved prescription cough, cold and allergy medicines now sitting on store shelves, the agency announced Wednesday. The products, which may be inappropriately labeled for use by infants and young children, could pose an unnecessary risk because they haven't been tested for safety and efficacy, the FDA said. Some may have risky ingredients, and others -- marketed as 'timed release' -- may release active ingredients too slowly, too quickly or inconsistently.
NATIONAL
March 19, 2011 | By Andrew Zajac, Washington Bureau
They used to call it "Edison's medicine" or, with a touch of gallows humor, a "Georgia Power cocktail" ? the practice of hooking mentally troubled patients up to an electrical current and jolting them until they went into convulsions. Pioneered in the late 1930s, electroshock therapy, as it was more commonly known, was a scientifically crude practice that often left patients dazed and disoriented, sometimes with broken bones. For many it became a symbol of the callousness that often characterized the treatment of the mentally ill. But that was then.
NEWS
December 27, 2010 | By Mary Forgione, For the Los Angeles Times
Remoxy may not have the name recognition of Percocet, but its makers say it has something Percocet and similar drugs don't have -- little potential for addiction. They've asked, again, that the FDA approve Remoxy. Like Percocet, Remoxy contains oxycodone, an opiate that Americans like quite a bit. Unlike other formulations, however, Remoxy employs a special controlled-release formula designed to limit its abuse. The National Institute on Drug Abuse reports that of 7 million Americans abusing prescription drugs in 2009, 5.3 million were abusing pain relievers.
NEWS
June 23, 2011 | By Marissa Cevallos, HealthKey / For the Booster Shots blog
The Food and Drug Administration is essentially telling U.S. consumers worried about silicone breast implants: “Told you so.” But in releasing new research backing up its 2006 decision to allow the implants back onto the market, the agency also reminds women, in a way, that they have only two choices — silicone or saline. So let’s take a look at those options. Until 2006, silicone implants had been under a 14-year ban by the FDA because of concerns that leaks or ruptures could increase the risk of certain diseases, including breast cancer and connective tissue diseases.
NEWS
August 2, 2011 | By Andrew Seidman
A coalition of nearly 30 organizations in the animal agriculture industry sent a letter to the heads of the House and Senate on Tuesday, asking lawmakers not to intervene as the Food and Drug Administration considers whether to approve genetically engineered salmon as food. The letter comes more than a month after the House approved an amendment, by voice acclamation, to an appropriations bill that would strip the FDA of funding to study the salmon. On July 15, members of the House and Senate sent letters to the FDA asking it to abandon its consideration of modified salmon as food, and threatened to propose legislation to bar further study of the fish if the agency does not comply.
BUSINESS
February 2, 2012 | By Matt Stevens
Trace levels of the fungicide carbendazim were discovered in domestic orange juice samples, the Food and Drug Administration reported Thursday. But the FDA said the levels pose no safety risk, and the orange juice will not be recalled. FDA spokeswoman Siobhan DeLancey said that most of the samples taken were from concentrated products that will be blended down into the orange juice consumers drink, so the low levels of carbendazim will almost disappear. “We didn't have any evidence to indicate that the product on the market was any safety problem at all,” DeLancey said.
SCIENCE
October 24, 2013 | By Melissa Healy
The Food and Drug Administration has laid out a roadmap for greater strictures on the prescribing and dispensing of hydrocodone and analgesics that contain it. The move is the latest in a chain of actions taken by the FDA and other agencies to address a burgeoning U.S. crisis of addiction to opioid painkillers. Under a plan announced by the FDA on Thursday afternoon, products containing the opioid painkiller hydrocodone, including combination analgesics such as Vicodin (which mixes hydrocodone with acetaminophen)
NEWS
March 30, 2011 | By Amina Khan, Los Angeles Times
Are food dyes linked to attention deficit hyperactivity disorder in children? The Food and Drug Administration is publicly considering that question for the first time in years.  From yellow to purple, artificial dyes have been used for decades to make all kinds of foodstuff more visually palatable, including Cheetos and Lucky Charms. They’re a nearly inescapable feature of any diet rich in packaged, brightly colored foods – but some consumer groups, including the Center for Science in the Public Interest in 2008, have argued that the dyes are responsible for making children hyperactive.
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