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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 2014 | By Joel Rubin
Los Angeles police officers tampered with voice recording equipment in dozens of patrol cars in an effort to avoid being monitored while on duty, according to records and interviews. An inspection by Los Angeles Police Department investigators found about half of the estimated 80 cars in one South L.A. patrol division were missing antennas, which help capture what officers say in the field. The antennas in at least 10 more cars in nearby divisions had also been removed. LAPD Chief Charlie Beck and other top officials learned of the problem last summer but chose not to investigate which officers were responsible.
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NATIONAL
April 10, 2014 | By Richard A. Serrano
WASHINGTON - An inspectors general report released Thursday faulted the FBI for failing to conduct a "more thorough assessment" of suspected Boston Marathon bomber Tamerlan Tsarnaev, saying such an investigation might have turned up evidence about his growing embrace of Islamic militancy and his possible threat to the United States. But the report's unclassified summary stopped short of saying a closer examination of Tsarnaev would necessarily have prevented the April 15, 2013, attack, which killed three people and injured more than 260. Acting on a 2011 tip from Russian intelligence, the FBI investigated Tsarnaev before last year's bombing, but closed the inquiry after the bureau found no links to terrorism.
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NEWS
July 27, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Waterbury Mayor Philip Giordano, who lost the U.S. Senate race to Sen. Joseph I. Lieberman last year, was arrested on federal sex charges involving a minor. Giordano, 38, was charged with using an interstate facility to entice a minor to engage in sexual activity and with conspiracy to commit that act. FBI Special Agent Michael Wolf said there were multiple victims under age 16, but he said the charges involved only one person. Investigators would not provide any other details.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 9, 2014 | By Paige St. John
SACRAMENTO -- A retired appellate judge in Los Angeles has been tapped by federal courts to make the final decision on which and how many inmates to release from prison if California fails to meet a court-ordered limit on the state prison population. In naming Elwood Lui the compliance officer in the prison crowding case, federal judges also put much of his work out of public view, declaring that his communications with the courts are "confidential and privileged. " Lui did not immediately return calls to his office for comment.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 10, 1995
I follow the pollution graphic every day it is published. Seldom does this index ever go over 100; most of the time it is in the 25 to 65 range. The federal bureaucrats constantly publish warnings of dire consequences if further steps are not taken to lower the pollution in this area. The federal, state and county governments are bankrupting this country slowly but surely in the not too distant future. RICHARD V. LAUBACHER SR. Oxnard
NEWS
November 6, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Federal housing authorities have failed to suitably enforce laws protecting the disabled from discrimination, an independent federal agency concluded. The Department of Housing and Urban Development ruled out discrimination in all but 2.4% of more than 12,000 complaints between 1988 and 2000, a National Council on Disability report found. By 2000, HUD was taking an average of 14 months, almost four times more than the prescribed legal cap, to complete investigations, the report said.
BUSINESS
May 27, 1989
Great American First Savings Bank said it will probably take a charge on earnings of $8 million to $14 million, possibly in the current quarter to end June 30, at the urging of federal regulators, because of a revision of the future value of the S&L's future loan servicing income. The exact timing of the charge on earnings will depend on when Great American reaches a final agreement with the Federal Home Loan Bank Board, spokesman Kenn Ulrich said Friday. Ulrich said Great American expects to recoup the charge as earned income over a five-year period.
NEWS
December 31, 1987 | Associated Press
Federal researchers today reported the first substantial yearly increase in tuberculosis in the United States in more than three decades of record-keeping, and said AIDS is partly to blame. The nation recorded 22,768 cases of tuberculosis in 1986, up 2.6% from 22,201 in 1985.
NATIONAL
April 29, 2009 | TIMES WIRE REPORTS
The government disavowed a 12-year-old federal report that found little or no cancer risk for adults who lived on a Marine base where drinking water was contaminated for three decades. Up to 1 million people could have been exposed to toxins that seeped from a neighboring dry cleaner and industrial activity at Camp Lejeune, federal officials say. "We can no longer stand behind the accuracy of the information in that document," said William Cibulas, director of health assessment for the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry.
BUSINESS
May 23, 2009 | TIMES WIRE SERVICES
Regulators have shut down Strategic Capital Bank in Illinois, marking the 35th failure this year -- and second this week -- of a federally insured bank. The Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. was appointed receiver of the bank, based in Champaign, Ill. The FDIC said the bank's deposits would be assumed by Midland States Bank, based in Effingham, Ill. Its branches will reopen Tuesday as branches of Midland States Bank.
NATIONAL
April 8, 2014 | By Kathleen Hennessey
WASHINGTON - President Obama used his executive power and a hot-button issue to try to stoke support from a key election-year constituency Tuesday, as he issued two directives aimed at ensuring federal contractors pay women as much as men for equal work. Surrounding himself with female supporters at the White House, Obama signed an executive order prohibiting federal contractors from retaliating against employees who talk about how much money they make. Advocates say secrecy about salaries is a major contributor to the gap in average pay between male and female workers in the United States, which the White House says means women make 77 cents for every dollar earned by men. The president also ordered contractors to report data to the government showing the compensation paid to employees by gender and race.
NATIONAL
April 7, 2014 | By Evan Halper
WASHINGTON - Adam Crain assumed that tapping into the computer networks used by power companies to keep electricity zipping through transmission lines would be nearly impossible in these days of heightened vigilance over cybersecurity. When he discovered how wrong he was, his work sent Homeland Security Department officials into a scramble. Crain, the owner of a small tech firm in Raleigh, N.C., along with a research partner, found penetrating transmission systems used by dozens of utilities to be startlingly easy.
NATIONAL
April 7, 2014 | By John M. Glionna
LAS VEGAS - Wielding signs and slogans, several hundred demonstrators rallied Monday to support beleaguered Nevada cattle rancher Cliven Bundy after authorities began to seize his cattle from federal land. Protesters had responded to an alert that promised: "Range war begins at the Bundy ranch at 9:30 a.m. We're going to get the job done!" Federal officials say Bundy is illegally running cattle in the 600,000-acre Gold Butte area, habitat of the federally protected desert tortoise.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 6, 2014 | By Michael Finnegan, David Zahniser and Doug Smith
In January, President Obama announced a block-by-block approach to relieving poverty in Los Angeles. Federal money, he said, would pour into a newly created Promise Zone. The boundaries encompassed crowded immigrant communities around MacArthur Park and Koreatown, as well as upscale areas of Hollywood and Los Feliz. Left out was South L.A., where the poverty rate is higher. The exclusion stunned many South L.A. leaders. The strategy, presidential aides said, was to concentrate resources in communities where nonprofits or public agencies had already received one of the Obama administration's signature urban renewal grants.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 5, 2014 | Kurt Streeter
Several of Southern California's most prominent religious leaders held a vigil for immigration reform in downtown Los Angeles on Friday, underscoring a growing interfaith effort to change the nation's laws. Immigrants who are in the United States illegally "need mercy and they need justice," said Archbishop Jose Gomez, welcoming an array of Christian, Jewish and Muslim leaders to the gathering at the Cathedral of Our Lady of the Angels. Gomez, who has made changing immigration laws a hallmark of his three-year tenure leading the L.A. Archdiocese, described the current system as "totally broken," adding that federal laws punished families and children unfairly.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 4, 2014 | By Maura Dolan, Patrick McGreevy and Paige St. John
SAN FRANCISCO - For more than two decades, Leland Yee climbed the political ladder in San Francisco. A child psychologist turned politician, Yee straddled opposing camps in the city's bare-knuckled political fights, appealing to both right and left and catering to constituents with a strong, attentive staff. Elegant in appearance and charming in manner, he courted financial contributors and built a reputation as a canny pol with an enviable knack of identifying the high-profile issue of the day and then weighing in before a thicket of cameras.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 3, 1993 | MATT KOHLMAN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
The world's second-largest active sand dune is in an unexpected place--more than a mile above sea level in southwestern Wyoming. The Killpecker Sand Dunes teem with life, from the graceful desert elk to the resourceful Jerusalem crickets and the spadefoot toads that shovel out holes with their hind feet and back themselves in during the day. The sands themselves seem to writhe in a slow-motion dance with the mighty, constant winds. Such winds first began scraping the earth to create the dunes 20,000 years ago near the end of the last glacial age. Scientists and federal environmentalists keen to preserve at least part of the 170 square miles of dunes hope to get Congress to designate some of it worthy of protection from the one creature that doesn't live here naturally: humans.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 3, 2014 | By Victoria Kim
Andre Birotte Jr., the chief federal prosecutor in Los Angeles, has been nominated by President Obama to serve as a judge in the U.S. District Court for the Central District of California, the White House announced Thursday. Birotte, who has served as the U.S. attorney overseeing the nation's second-largest office since 2010, is a former Los Angeles County deputy public defender who also acted as the Los Angeles Police Department's inspector general for six years. As L.A.'s top federal prosecutor, he reinstated a public corruption and civil rights unit disbanded by his predecessor and oversaw high-profile investigations into the L.A. County jails and into state Sen. Ronald S. Calderon.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 2, 2014 | By Steve Chawkins
Robert L. Brosio, a retired federal prosecutor who supervised high-profile cases that included those against bank swindler Charles Keating Jr. and Los Angeles police officers who were involved in the beating of Rodney King, has died. He was 77. Brosio, who for 28 years led the criminal division of the U.S. attorney's office in Los Angeles, had a massive pulmonary embolism in February, his daughter Serena Brosio said. He died Friday at a Pasadena hospital. While he seldom argued cases in court himself, Brosio was in charge of more than 100 prosecutors and set a standard of "ramrod integrity," said Nora Manella, an associate justice of the California Court of Appeal in Los Angeles.
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