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Federal Communication Commission

BUSINESS
July 19, 1995
Responding to public concern about sex and violence on television, Congress is considering legislation which would require television broadcasters and TV manufacturers to implement a ratings system technology known as the V-chip. (The "V" stands for violence.) Other proposed names include the choice chip.
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BUSINESS
December 16, 1995 | Reuters
Federal regulators Friday approved a $4.2-billion investment in Sprint Corp. by the state-run phone monopolies of France and Germany, after imposing conditions on the deal meant to open the French and German phone markets. The Federal Communication Commission's unanimous approval brings France Telecom and Deutsche Telekom a step closer to finalizing their 20% joint stake in the third-largest U.S. provider of long-distance phone services.
NEWS
June 14, 1987
By a 302-105 vote, the House passed a bill (HR 2533) requiring the Reagan Administration to give Congress a detailed assessment of the military and diplomatic situation in the Persian Gulf, including plans for expanding America's role there. Because of uncertainty over whether it condoned or challenged Administration policy in the volatile region, the measure drew votes on both sides from members of all ideologies.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 19, 1992 | PATRICK McCARTNEY
The Santa Paula City Council has sent a letter of complaint to Ventura County Cablevision objecting to the partial blackout of KEYT, the ABC network affiliate located in Santa Barbara. In the letter, Mayor Alfonso Urias asked the company to "take appropriate action to continue local programming for the citizens of Ventura County."
BUSINESS
October 12, 1990 | THOMAS B. ROSENSTIEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A last minute compromise involving the right of cable television operators to obtain exclusive programming appeared to breathe new life Thursday into Senate legislation that would re-regulate the cable industry. But the bill still could be prevented from coming to a vote by Republican senators allied with the Bush Administration, which has threatened a veto on the grounds that the industry would be subjected to excessive regulation if the measure passes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 26, 1986 | LEONARD BERNSTEIN, Times Staff Writer
Three candidates in the race for a seat on the San Diego Board of Education announced Tuesday that they will not sign waivers allowing a local radio station to play a fourth candidate's musical jingles. Candidates Al Korobkin, Jim Roache and Sue Braun said they will not sign waivers allowing KFMB-AM (760) to play record producer Steve Vaus' tunes about the San Diego Padres.
BUSINESS
December 20, 1985 | Associated Press
General Electric and RCA Corp. have agreed to divest RCA's consumer electronics business if necessary to win government approval of GE's proposed $6.28-billion acquisition of RCA. But GE reiterated Thursday that it did not expect the government to raise antitrust objections that will force the divestiture of RCA's $2-billion consumer electronics unit, which, according to industry estimates, is the nation's leading seller of color televisions and videocassette recorders.
OPINION
September 5, 2013 | By the Times Editorial Board
The battle over federal "net neutrality" rules resumes Monday when a federal appeals court takes up the challenge filed by one of the country's largest Internet service providers: Verizon. The phone company, which argues that the Federal Communication Commission's rules violate federal law and the Constitution, asserts that ISPs have a 1st Amendment right to edit or block the data flowing from websites to their customers. The company's stance is strange and self-contradictory, considering its long-standing efforts to be freed from liability for the "speech" that travels through its wires.
BUSINESS
November 16, 2012 | By Jim Puzzanghera
WASHINGTON -- Federal regulators on Friday granted waivers to the Tribune Co. for its ownership of newspapers and broadcast stations in five markets, clearing the way for the company to emerge from its long-running bankruptcy. The Federal Communication Commission's Media Bureau issued the waivers of its so-called cross-ownership rules for Tribune's media properties in Los Angeles, Chicago, New York, South Florida and Hartford, Conn. The waivers allow the agency to transfer TV and radio station licenses in those markets to Tribune's new owners, a group led by senior creditors Oaktree Capital Management , Angelo Gordon & Co. and JPMorgan Chase & Co. “We are extremely pleased with today's action by the FCC,” said Eddy Hartenstein, Tribune's chief executive officer.
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