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BUSINESS
December 31, 1996
Veteran Federal Communications Commissioner James Quello, who will complete 23 years at the agency in April when he turns 83, has approached White House officials about resigning from his post but has not made a decision on whether he will leave the FCC next year. Quello told White House officials that he was considering leaving June 1 but would stay on if they wanted him to. Quello said he has been mulling plans to teach at his alma mater, Michigan State University.
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BUSINESS
December 31, 1996
Veteran Federal Communications Commissioner James Quello, who will complete 23 years at the agency in April when he turns 83, has approached White House officials about resigning from his post but has not made a decision on whether he will leave the FCC next year. Quello told White House officials that he was considering leaving June 1 but would stay on if they wanted him to. Quello said he has been mulling plans to teach at his alma mater, Michigan State University.
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NEWS
August 7, 1985 | Associated Press
Federal Communications Commissioner Henry M. Rivera announced his resignation today, effective Sept. 15. Rivera, who joined the FCC in 1981, said at a meeting of the commission that he will return to private law practice in Washington.
BUSINESS
April 18, 2007 | From Reuters
Tribune Co. will have to mount some persuasive arguments why regulators should allow real estate mogul Sam Zell to take the media company private, Federal Communications Commissioner Michael J. Copps said. "This is a multifaceted proceeding, so I am not going to prejudge it. I will look at it in terms of the world we live in," Copps said on the sidelines of the National Assn. of Broadcasters' annual conference.
BUSINESS
February 6, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Quello Named Interim Head of FCC: Federal Communications Commissioner James H. Quello has been named interim chairman of the agency, which has been without a permanent chief since last month's departure of Alfred C. Sikes. Quello, a Democrat, whose term ends June 30, 1996, was first nominated to the commission by former President Richard Nixon. He will serve as chairman of the FCC until President Clinton appoints a permanent replacement.
NEWS
July 22, 1986
After charging that the cable television industry has too much control over what TV stations a viewer can watch, Federal Communications Commissioner James H. Quello said he will urge his fellow commissioners to reinstate a rule requiring cable TV firms to carry all local stations. The issue is to be voted on by the FCC on Aug. 7. A federal appeals court in Washington, D.C.
BUSINESS
March 1, 2006 | From Reuters
U.S. cable television providers have not done enough to give customers more choices despite unveiling new packages of family-oriented programming, Federal Communications Commissioner Deborah Taylor Tate said. After pressure from U.S. lawmakers and regulators, top cable operators, including Comcast Corp. and Time Warner Inc., said they planned to offer family packages but resisted calls for subscribers to be able to pay for only the channels they want.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 20, 2013 | By Joe Flint
Federal Communications Commissioner Robert McDowell, who was seen as a free-market advocate and friend to the media industry and a foil to FCC Chairman Julius Genachowski, announced he is leaving the regulatory agency in the next few weeks. A Republican, McDowell has been at the FCC for almost seven years and was seen as a potential chairman if Mitt Romney had won the White House in November. McDowell did not say what his future plans are. McDowell often disagreed with Genachowski on how to best regulate the media industry.
BUSINESS
November 17, 2004 | Jube Shiver Jr., Times Staff Writer
Federal Communications Commissioner Jonathan S. Adelstein, who clashed with some of his fellow commissioners over such issues as expanding telephone competition and loosening media ownership rules, is being renominated by President Bush. The Democrat, whose appointment was disclosed on the White House website this week, had been written off until recently by FCC watchers as a lame duck.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 5, 1995 | JUDITH MICHAELSON
Describing public television as a "small and vulnerable institution" with "nothing to fight with but a sword called truth," PBS President Ervin S. Duggan on Wednesday urged the "broad center" of Americans who value public programming to let Congress know. No lobbying strategy "will be nearly as effective as the voices . . . and letters from people around the country. . . . It seems to me they should speak out," Duggan said to an audience of TV writers and critics in Pasadena.
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