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NATIONAL
September 12, 2001 | Matea Gold and Maggie Farley, Los Angeles Times Staff Writers
In the worst terrorist attack ever against the United States, hijackers struck at the preeminent symbols of the nation's wealth and might Tuesday, flying airliners into the World Trade Center and the Pentagon and killing or injuring thousands of people. As a horrified nation watched on television, the twin towers of the World Trade Center in lower Manhattan collapsed into flaming rubble after two Boeing 767s rammed their upper stories. A third airliner, a Boeing 757, flattened one of the Pentagon's five sides.
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OPINION
April 27, 2014 | Times Editorial Board
Some 50 political leaders from nine Western states gathered in Salt Lake City this month to discuss plans to wrest control of millions of acres of public lands from the federal government. One wonders whether, like a dog chasing a car, they've figured out what they would do with the land if they got hold of it? In any case, that's unlikely to happen, based on decades of court battles and settled law. Nevertheless, these angry legislators and local commissioners seem determined to waste time and energy on this futile effort, propelled by a warped sense of history and priorities.
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NATIONAL
March 3, 2013 | By Jim Puzzanghera
WASHINGTON - Signaling a cease-fire of sorts in Washington's bitter budget wars, Republican leaders in Congress and a senior White House official expressed optimism Sunday that they can reach a deal to avoid adding a painful government shutdown this month to the deep budget cuts that just began.  “I'm hopeful that the House and Senate will be able to work through this,” House Speaker John A. Boehner (R-Ohio) said on NBC's “Meet the Press.” He said he was “absolutely” committed to keeping the government running.
NEWS
April 25, 2014 | By Sara Lessley
“Patriots” or “domestic terrorists”? “Citizen soldiers” or “disenfranchised militiamen”? “Honest businessman” or “freeloader?” It seems many are firmly on one side or the other when it comes to the standoff between 67-year-old cattleman Cliven Bundy (and his armed sympathizers) and the Bureau of Land Management over his cattle grazing on public land in Nevada. As Times staff writers John M. Glionna and Richard Simon wrote this week : “Bundy has his critics, but to supporters, his case is a symbol of everything wrong with America.
NATIONAL
February 8, 2014 | By Timothy M. Phelps
WASHINGTON -- In a new milestone for gay rights, Atty. Gen. Eric H. Holder Jr. will issue a directive Monday expanding government recognition of same-sex marriages to all federal courtrooms and prisons, and some federal benefits programs. The new policy, which Holder plans to announce Saturday night at a gay rights dinner in New York City, means the Justice Department will not object if gay or lesbian partners refuse to testify against their spouses in federal criminal and civil cases, and will push for them to be accorded the same rights in Bankruptcy court as other married couples.
NEWS
October 11, 2011 | By Robin Abcarian
Michele Bachmann and Newt Gingrich unleashed scathing critiques against the federal government, blaming it for causing the economic meltdown that has devastated the nation's housing market. “Do you think it's right that no Wall Street executives have gone to jail?” asked moderator Karen Tumulty. Bachmann put the blame squarely not on Wall Street but on the government. "The federal government that pushed the subprime loans, that pushed the Community Reinvestment Act,” she said.
BUSINESS
July 3, 2013 | By Adolfo Flores
Despite making progress, the federal government fell short of its 2012 small-business contracting goals, according to figures released Tuesday. U.S. agencies awarded 22.25% of federal contracts to small firms, just shy of the goal of 23%, the Small Business Administration said. But it was an increase from 21.65% in 2011. The government did exceed its contract goals for small businesses owned by people of color and disabled veterans. However, it missed its goals for small businesses owned by women and those in historically underserved business zones.
NEWS
September 30, 2013 | By Kathleen Hennessy
WASHINGTON - With the House and Senate locked in stalemate, the Office of Management and Budget formally began shutting down the government late Monday, ordering federal agencies to prepare for funding to expire and to execute contingency plans. "Unfortunately, we do not have a clear indication that Congress will act in time for the president to sign a continuing resolution before the end of the day tomorrow, Oct. 1, 2013. Therefore, agencies should now execute plans for an orderly shutdown due to the absence of appropriations,” wrote OMB director Sylvia M. Burwell in a memorandum circulated at 11:45 p.m. Eastern time.
NEWS
October 3, 2012 | By Robin Abcarian
Jim Lehrer, moderator of the first presidential debate, had the habit of asking President Obama and Mitt Romney to delineate their differences with each other on important issues of the day. It was perhaps his way of trying to create a spark Wednesday night. Unfortunately, as a technique, it didn't really work - at least not at setting off oratorical combat.  Case in point, this question from Lehrer: “Do you believe, both of you, there's a fundamental difference between the two of you as to how you view the mission of the federal government?
SPORTS
April 27, 2012 | Wire reports
The federal government is investigating the business practices of the NBA players' union. The union confirmed Friday it has received a subpoena for documents from the U.S. attorney's office in Manhattan and says it will cooperate with the investigation. The NBPA also said in a statement that it has appointed a special committee to oversee an internal inquiry, including a financial audit. Recent reports have questioned the NBPA's finances and spending practices, largely having to do with the hiring of family members and firms that employ relatives of Executive Director Billy Hunter . Hunter says he will cooperate with the internal inquiry, but will not be in involved in the effort so it remains independent.
NATIONAL
April 25, 2014 | By John M. Glionna
Are you heading to Bunkerville/To stand up and fight? Are you heading to Bunkerville/For your freedom and rights? Are you heading to Bunkerville/To stand up with me? -- From the song “Are You Heading to Bunkerville?” by Wayne and Paula Carson BUNKERVILLE, Nev. -- Susan DeLemus watched as her man headed to Bunkerville. The Rochester, N.H., resident was trolling the computer earlier this month with her husband, Jerry, when she saw him stiffen with surprise and rage at what he saw on his own computer screen.
NATIONAL
April 25, 2014 | By John M. Glionna
Militant Nevada rancher Cliven Bundy on Friday apologized for his comments published this week on African Americans and slavery but refused to back off from his intended point that the federal government was too powerful, saying that his remarks came “from the heart.” In a daily news conference from his ranch in Bunkerville, north of Las Vegas, the 67-year-old rancher, who is in a prolonged battle with federal officials over grazing rights...
NATIONAL
April 24, 2014 | By John M. Glionna and Richard Simon
BUNKERVILLE, Nev. - The first thing you see on the drive to Cliven Bundy's ranch are the American flags - tied to roadside guardrails, flapping in a hard desert wind. At a bend in state Route 170 sits the so-called Patriot Checkpoint, evidence of the tense power play raging between the rebellious 67-year-old cattleman and the federal government. Then there are the guns. Scores of grim citizen militiamen in combat fatigues - semiautomatic weapons slung over their shoulders, ammunition magazines at their belts - patrol from a base they call Camp Tripwire.
NATIONAL
April 24, 2014 | By John M. Glionna
LAS VEGAS -- Nevada rancher Cliven Bundy's battle against the federal government over land rights took an unexpected detour after a newspaper quoted the 67-year-old grandfather suggesting African Americans were "better off as slaves" because slavery taught work skills and enhanced family life. Bundy, who has waged a standoff with the Bureau of Land Management, insisting he has a right to graze hundreds of head of cattle on public lands without paying fees, has been surrounded by citizen militias that have converged on his ranch in rural Bunkerville after armed federal officials moved in to remove Bundy's cattle.
OPINION
April 23, 2014 | Times Editorial Board
Nevada rancher Cliven Bundy is being portrayed by some as a man of principle, an iconoclast who should be admired for his willingness to stand up to the federal government. But in fact he's a petty scofflaw who seems to think that he has the right to pick and choose which rules must be obeyed. Bundy is the cattleman who grazes his herd on federal land operated by the U.S. Bureau of Land Management, but unlike more than 15,000 other ranchers, he refuses to pay the associated grazing fees.
OPINION
April 15, 2014
Re "BLM relents after standoff," April 13 Relenting to the demands of the armed supporters of Nevada rancher Cliven Bundy, who has his cattle graze on public land but refuses to pay the U.S. Bureau of Land Management, sends a dangerous message: that disputes with the federal government are best resolved with threats of violence. This outcome will only inspire more radicals to take arms against the U.S. government. This is a serious setback for civil discourse and undermines the rule of law that all citizens need for safety and stability.
NEWS
January 10, 1996 | Reuters
The federal government will be closed due to weather for a third straight day as the Washington area continues to dig itself out from one of the heaviest snowfalls on record, U.S. officials said Tuesday night. Earlier in the day, the Office of Personnel Management had announced plans to reopen the government today, but new snowfall proved too much to clean up.
BUSINESS
April 14, 2014 | By Michael A. Memoli
WASHINGTON - Lower-than-expected health insurance premiums under Obamacare will help cut the long-term cost of the program 7% over the next decade, according to the latest report from the Congressional Budget Office. The government's reduction of $104 billion in subsidies for those premiums was the main factor that led the nonpartisan fiscal watchdog to cut its projection of the nation's federal deficit by nearly $300 billion through 2024. According to the CBO report, released Monday, the average annual premium for the new healthcare exchanges' mid-level Silver plan - used as a benchmark - is expected to be $4,400 by 2016.
BUSINESS
April 11, 2014 | By Chris O'Brien
The National Security Agency denied a report that it has exploited the "Heartbleed" bug to spy on consumers for the past two years. "NSA was not aware of the recently identified vulnerability in OpenSSL, the so-called Heartbleed vulnerability, until it was made public in a private sector cybersecurity report," the agency said in a statement. "Reports that say otherwise are wrong. Reports that NSA or any other part of the government were aware of the so-called Heartbleed vulnerability before April 2014 are wrong.
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