Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsFederal Law
IN THE NEWS

Federal Law

WORLD
October 15, 2009 | TIMES WIRE REPORTS
Gunmen attacked a federal law enforcement building in Lahore and a police academy on the outskirts of the city. Two people were killed at the Federal Investigation Agency, which deals with matters such as immigration and terrorism. Police said one wore a jacket laden with explosives. On the city outskirts, the Manawan Police Academy was attacked for the second time this year.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
October 23, 2012 | By Stuart Pfeifer, Los Angeles Times
The brothers behind the 1-800-GET-THIN ad campaign are the subjects of a criminal investigation involving several federal and state law enforcement agencies, according to a court filing. The investigation is focused on numerous "potential violations of federal law, including conspiracy, healthcare fraud, wire fraud, mail fraud, tax violations, identity theft [and] money laundering," Samanta Kelley, a special agent for the Food and Drug Administration's criminal division, said in an affidavit filed at the federal courthouse in Los Angeles.
NATIONAL
February 26, 2014 | By Paresh Dave
Delta Air Lines has denounced legislation that would permit businesses to cite religion in refusing to serve gays, saying  proposals in Georgia and Arizona would cause “significant harm” and “result in job losses.” The company, which is Atlanta's largest employer and one of the biggest private companies in Georgia, joins the likes of Apple, American Airlines and Marriott in opposing such measures. Arizonans  are awaiting  Gov. Jan Brewer's decision on whether to sign or veto legislation that would bolster business owners' rights to cite their religion as a defense in discrimination lawsuits.
OPINION
August 19, 2012
Indian gambling has brought long-needed financial gains to Native American tribes as well as a measure of painful internal strife. In California, reservations where dilapidated mobile homes once dominated the landscape are now dotted with attractive new housing developments, playgrounds, and community, health and fitness centers. At the same time, according to academics and other experts on tribal affairs, gambling wealth has given new impetus to the disenrollment of thousands of California's Native Americans from their tribes by others who want to maximize their share of the money.
NATIONAL
January 22, 2013 | By David G. Savage, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - Marijuana will continue to be considered a highly dangerous drug under federal law with no accepted medical uses, after a U.S. appeals court Tuesday refused to order a change in the government's 40-year-old drug classification schedule. The decision keeps in place an odd legal split over marijuana, a drug deemed to be as dangerous as heroin and worse than methamphetamine by federal authorities, but one that has been legalized for medical use by voters or legislators in 20 states and the District of Columbia.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 14, 2013 | By Catherine Saillant
A long-running legal dispute over the use of a Hancock Park home as an Orthodox Jewish prayer house ended Wednesday with the city of Los Angeles agreeing to pay $950,000 in attorney fees and costs to settle the case. The Los Angeles City Council voted unanimously to pay lawyers representing Congregation Etz Chaim in the case involving a residential property at 3 rd Street and Highland Avenue. Synagogue leaders sued the city in 2010, challenging its denial of a conditional use permit to use the enlarged home as a religious sanctuary.
BUSINESS
April 24, 2009 | Times Wire Reports
Countrywide Financial Corp., the mortgage lender acquired by Bank of America Corp., reached a preliminary settlement with employees who accused the company of withholding information about its financial health and causing the value of their retirement plan to drop. Plaintiffs' lawyers filed papers in federal court in Los Angeles indicating that an "agreement in principle" had been reached in the 2007 class-action lawsuit alleging violations of the Employee Retirement Income Security Act, or ERISA, a federal law that protects employee pension plans.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 19, 2008 | From the Associated Press
A federal judge has tossed out California's challenge to a national abortion law that officials say could cost the state billions in federal funds. California sued the federal government after President Bush in 2004 authorized harsh financial penalties on states that discriminate against doctors who refuse to provide abortions. California allows doctors and hospitals to refuse to perform abortions for religious or moral reasons, but the state requires them to perform an abortion when childbirth threatens the woman's life or health.
BUSINESS
March 25, 2003 | From Bloomberg News
The U.S. Supreme Court refused to free MGM Mirage Inc. from a lawsuit by a gay former employee who says he was sexually harassed by male co-workers. The justices turned down arguments by the casino company that the suit should be thrown out because federal law doesn't protect against job discrimination based on sexual orientation. Medina Rene worked as a butler in the MGM Grand Hotel in Las Vegas from 1993 until 1996, when he was fired.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|