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BUSINESS
February 6, 2013 | By W.J. Hennigan
Charlottesville, Va., has taken action against the use of police spy drones, ordering a two-year moratorium on the citywide use of unmanned aircraft. It is the first city in the nation to do so, supporters say, and its move may prompt other municipalities to act. Seeking tough regulation over the future use of civilian drones in U.S. airspace, the City Council passed a resolution that prohibits police agencies from utilizing drones outfitted with anti-personnel devices such as Tasers and tear gas. It also sought to block governments from using data recorded via police spy drones in criminal prosecutions.
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NEWS
April 12, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
More than 200 federal law enforcement officers will help local police patrol the streets of the nation's capital, and when necessary, arrest those who break local laws. The FBI, National Zoological Park Police and U.S. Defense Protective Service have signed agreements with the District of Columbia Metropolitan Police Department giving federal officers the authority to patrol areas surrounding their jurisdictions.
WORLD
October 15, 2009 | TIMES WIRE REPORTS
Gunmen attacked a federal law enforcement building in Lahore and a police academy on the outskirts of the city. Two people were killed at the Federal Investigation Agency, which deals with matters such as immigration and terrorism. Police said one wore a jacket laden with explosives. On the city outskirts, the Manawan Police Academy was attacked for the second time this year.
SPORTS
December 20, 2013 | By Eric Sondheimer
 The U.S. District Court in Los Angeles has ended its oversight of a case involving Alhambra High and failure to comply with Title IX, the federal law regarding sex discrimination. The California Women's Law Center and Legal Aid Society-Employment Center brought the case, Cruz vs. Alhambra. Alhambra has since complied with terms of a settlement, building new softball fields and adding new teams for girls' athletics. "Alhambra High School's work in connection with this settlement shows that any high school in Californa can comply with Title IX, which has been law for over 40 years," said Elizabeth Kristen of the Legal Aid Society in a statement.
NATIONAL
January 15, 2014 | By David G. Savage
WASHINGTON - In a case pitting free speech against abortion rights, Supreme Court justices signaled Wednesday they were inclined to strike down a Massachusetts law that sets a 35-foot buffer zone to prevent protesters from approaching clinics that offer the procedure. Opponents called the law a violation of free speech and complained it prohibits "peaceful conversation on a public sidewalk," said Mark Rienzi, the attorney representing antiabortion activist Eleanor McCullen, 77, from Boston.
NATIONAL
January 22, 2013 | By David G. Savage, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - Marijuana will continue to be considered a highly dangerous drug under federal law with no accepted medical uses, after a U.S. appeals court Tuesday refused to order a change in the government's 40-year-old drug classification schedule. The decision keeps in place an odd legal split over marijuana, a drug deemed to be as dangerous as heroin and worse than methamphetamine by federal authorities, but one that has been legalized for medical use by voters or legislators in 20 states and the District of Columbia.
NATIONAL
March 27, 2013 | By David G. Savage
WASHINGTON - The Supreme Court has begun debating whether the 130,000 legally married gay couples in this country are entitled to the same benefits under federal law as heterosexual married couples. The justices seemed reluctant Tuesday to rule that gays have a right to marry, but Wednesday's oral arguments may indicate whether they are prepared to take smaller but significant steps in favor of legally married same-sex partners. At issue is the part of the  Defense of Marriage Act of 1996 that says the federal government will recognize only marriages between a man and a woman. As with Tuesday's argument, the question is whether this provision denies gay and lesbian couples the “equal protection of the laws” promised by the Constitution.
BUSINESS
April 24, 2009 | Times Wire Reports
Countrywide Financial Corp., the mortgage lender acquired by Bank of America Corp., reached a preliminary settlement with employees who accused the company of withholding information about its financial health and causing the value of their retirement plan to drop. Plaintiffs' lawyers filed papers in federal court in Los Angeles indicating that an "agreement in principle" had been reached in the 2007 class-action lawsuit alleging violations of the Employee Retirement Income Security Act, or ERISA, a federal law that protects employee pension plans.
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