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NEWS
April 12, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
More than 200 federal law enforcement officers will help local police patrol the streets of the nation's capital, and when necessary, arrest those who break local laws. The FBI, National Zoological Park Police and U.S. Defense Protective Service have signed agreements with the District of Columbia Metropolitan Police Department giving federal officers the authority to patrol areas surrounding their jurisdictions.
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WORLD
October 15, 2009 | TIMES WIRE REPORTS
Gunmen attacked a federal law enforcement building in Lahore and a police academy on the outskirts of the city. Two people were killed at the Federal Investigation Agency, which deals with matters such as immigration and terrorism. Police said one wore a jacket laden with explosives. On the city outskirts, the Manawan Police Academy was attacked for the second time this year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 22, 2013 | By Jason Felch
A ring of Southern California businesses has been illegally selling nitrous oxide for use as a recreational drug, federal and local law enforcement officials said Friday afternoon in announcing a regional crackdown. Three auto supply employees were arrested earlier in the day in a federal law enforcement sweep that included searches of 17 businesses and nine delivery vehicles linked to the ring, authorities said. A fourth suspect is still being sought. Nitrous oxide, commonly known as laughing gas, can be used for welding, as a speed booster in cars or as an as anesthetic by dentists and doctors.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 14, 2013 | By Catherine Saillant
A long-running legal dispute over the use of a Hancock Park home as an Orthodox Jewish prayer house ended Wednesday with the city of Los Angeles agreeing to pay $950,000 in attorney fees and costs to settle the case. The Los Angeles City Council voted unanimously to pay lawyers representing Congregation Etz Chaim in the case involving a residential property at 3 rd Street and Highland Avenue. Synagogue leaders sued the city in 2010, challenging its denial of a conditional use permit to use the enlarged home as a religious sanctuary.
NATIONAL
March 27, 2013 | By David G. Savage
WASHINGTON - The Supreme Court has begun debating whether the 130,000 legally married gay couples in this country are entitled to the same benefits under federal law as heterosexual married couples. The justices seemed reluctant Tuesday to rule that gays have a right to marry, but Wednesday's oral arguments may indicate whether they are prepared to take smaller but significant steps in favor of legally married same-sex partners. At issue is the part of the  Defense of Marriage Act of 1996 that says the federal government will recognize only marriages between a man and a woman. As with Tuesday's argument, the question is whether this provision denies gay and lesbian couples the “equal protection of the laws” promised by the Constitution.
BUSINESS
April 24, 2009 | Times Wire Reports
Countrywide Financial Corp., the mortgage lender acquired by Bank of America Corp., reached a preliminary settlement with employees who accused the company of withholding information about its financial health and causing the value of their retirement plan to drop. Plaintiffs' lawyers filed papers in federal court in Los Angeles indicating that an "agreement in principle" had been reached in the 2007 class-action lawsuit alleging violations of the Employee Retirement Income Security Act, or ERISA, a federal law that protects employee pension plans.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 19, 2008 | From the Associated Press
A federal judge has tossed out California's challenge to a national abortion law that officials say could cost the state billions in federal funds. California sued the federal government after President Bush in 2004 authorized harsh financial penalties on states that discriminate against doctors who refuse to provide abortions. California allows doctors and hospitals to refuse to perform abortions for religious or moral reasons, but the state requires them to perform an abortion when childbirth threatens the woman's life or health.
BUSINESS
March 25, 2003 | From Bloomberg News
The U.S. Supreme Court refused to free MGM Mirage Inc. from a lawsuit by a gay former employee who says he was sexually harassed by male co-workers. The justices turned down arguments by the casino company that the suit should be thrown out because federal law doesn't protect against job discrimination based on sexual orientation. Medina Rene worked as a butler in the MGM Grand Hotel in Las Vegas from 1993 until 1996, when he was fired.
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