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BUSINESS
September 12, 2013 | David Lazarus
CVS Caremark insists that it's just complying with federal law by informing customers that their medical information could be "redisclosed" if they sign up for the company's prescription-drug reward program. Privacy experts, though, question whether CVS is complying with state law. "California's privacy law is stricter than federal law," said Charles Googooian, a La Canada Flintridge lawyer who specializes in medical-privacy issues. "It doesn't seem like CVS is complying with either the spirit or the letter of state law. " CVS has been scrambling to defend its ExtraCare Pharmacy & Health Rewards program since I recently reported that customers are being required to give up important federal privacy safeguards in return for up to $50 a year in store credits.
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NEWS
April 12, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
More than 200 federal law enforcement officers will help local police patrol the streets of the nation's capital, and when necessary, arrest those who break local laws. The FBI, National Zoological Park Police and U.S. Defense Protective Service have signed agreements with the District of Columbia Metropolitan Police Department giving federal officers the authority to patrol areas surrounding their jurisdictions.
WORLD
October 15, 2009 | TIMES WIRE REPORTS
Gunmen attacked a federal law enforcement building in Lahore and a police academy on the outskirts of the city. Two people were killed at the Federal Investigation Agency, which deals with matters such as immigration and terrorism. Police said one wore a jacket laden with explosives. On the city outskirts, the Manawan Police Academy was attacked for the second time this year.
NATIONAL
January 22, 2013 | By David G. Savage, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - Marijuana will continue to be considered a highly dangerous drug under federal law with no accepted medical uses, after a U.S. appeals court Tuesday refused to order a change in the government's 40-year-old drug classification schedule. The decision keeps in place an odd legal split over marijuana, a drug deemed to be as dangerous as heroin and worse than methamphetamine by federal authorities, but one that has been legalized for medical use by voters or legislators in 20 states and the District of Columbia.
OPINION
August 19, 2012
Indian gambling has brought long-needed financial gains to Native American tribes as well as a measure of painful internal strife. In California, reservations where dilapidated mobile homes once dominated the landscape are now dotted with attractive new housing developments, playgrounds, and community, health and fitness centers. At the same time, according to academics and other experts on tribal affairs, gambling wealth has given new impetus to the disenrollment of thousands of California's Native Americans from their tribes by others who want to maximize their share of the money.
OPINION
June 29, 2013 | By Michael J. Klarman
Two blockbuster cases decided in the final week of the Supreme Court's 2012-13 term invalidated critical provisions of federal statutes. In United States vs. Windsor, the court struck down Section 3 of the Defense of Marriage Act of 1996, which defined marriage for purposes of federal law as a union between a man and a woman. In Shelby County vs. Holder, the court invalidated a key provision of the 1965 Voting Rights Act, effectively eliminating the requirement that certain jurisdictions submit proposed election-law changes to federal officials for review before implementation.
NATIONAL
March 27, 2013 | By David G. Savage
WASHINGTON - The Supreme Court has begun debating whether the 130,000 legally married gay couples in this country are entitled to the same benefits under federal law as heterosexual married couples. The justices seemed reluctant Tuesday to rule that gays have a right to marry, but Wednesday's oral arguments may indicate whether they are prepared to take smaller but significant steps in favor of legally married same-sex partners. At issue is the part of the  Defense of Marriage Act of 1996 that says the federal government will recognize only marriages between a man and a woman. As with Tuesday's argument, the question is whether this provision denies gay and lesbian couples the “equal protection of the laws” promised by the Constitution.
BUSINESS
April 24, 2009 | Times Wire Reports
Countrywide Financial Corp., the mortgage lender acquired by Bank of America Corp., reached a preliminary settlement with employees who accused the company of withholding information about its financial health and causing the value of their retirement plan to drop. Plaintiffs' lawyers filed papers in federal court in Los Angeles indicating that an "agreement in principle" had been reached in the 2007 class-action lawsuit alleging violations of the Employee Retirement Income Security Act, or ERISA, a federal law that protects employee pension plans.
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