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BUSINESS
March 3, 2014 | By Michael Hiltzik
Mark A.R. Kleiman is out this week with the single most comprehensive look at the trend toward legalizing pot you're likely to find. He doesn't spend much space on the pros and cons of legalization -- almost anyone can tick those off on the fingers of both hands -- but on the right way to do it, and the wrong way. Short version: Colorado and Washington are doing it the wrong way, and the federal government's hands-off approach isn't making things...
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NEWS
April 12, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
More than 200 federal law enforcement officers will help local police patrol the streets of the nation's capital, and when necessary, arrest those who break local laws. The FBI, National Zoological Park Police and U.S. Defense Protective Service have signed agreements with the District of Columbia Metropolitan Police Department giving federal officers the authority to patrol areas surrounding their jurisdictions.
WORLD
October 15, 2009 | TIMES WIRE REPORTS
Gunmen attacked a federal law enforcement building in Lahore and a police academy on the outskirts of the city. Two people were killed at the Federal Investigation Agency, which deals with matters such as immigration and terrorism. Police said one wore a jacket laden with explosives. On the city outskirts, the Manawan Police Academy was attacked for the second time this year.
SPORTS
December 20, 2013 | By Eric Sondheimer
 The U.S. District Court in Los Angeles has ended its oversight of a case involving Alhambra High and failure to comply with Title IX, the federal law regarding sex discrimination. The California Women's Law Center and Legal Aid Society-Employment Center brought the case, Cruz vs. Alhambra. Alhambra has since complied with terms of a settlement, building new softball fields and adding new teams for girls' athletics. "Alhambra High School's work in connection with this settlement shows that any high school in Californa can comply with Title IX, which has been law for over 40 years," said Elizabeth Kristen of the Legal Aid Society in a statement.
NEWS
February 14, 2014 | By Timothy M. Phelps
WASHINGTON - The Obama administration issued guidance to prosecutors and banks Friday meant to make it easier for legal marijuana sellers to open bank accounts. But the guidance fell short of giving banks carte blanche to get involved in a business that is legal in some states for medical or recreational purposes but is still illegal under federal law. A memo issued Friday by Atty. Gen. Eric H. Holder Jr. to all federal prosecutors said that prosecution may not be appropriate for banks dealing with marijuana sellers if they are operating legally in their states and stay away from red zones, such as the sale of the drug to minors or across state lines.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 4, 2013 | By Michael J. Mishak
SACRAMENTO -- A key Senate panel supported legislation Monday that would dramatically expand Medi-Cal, the state's public insurance program for the poor. The proposal, authored by state Sen. Ed Hernandez (D-West Covina) and Senate leader Darrell Steinberg (D-Sacramento), is part of a legislative package that aims to help California implement President Obama's healthcare overhaul. Beginning in January 2014, the federal Affordable Care Act requires most Americans to buy health insurance or pay a penalty.
BUSINESS
October 23, 2012 | By Stuart Pfeifer, Los Angeles Times
The brothers behind the 1-800-GET-THIN ad campaign are the subjects of a criminal investigation involving several federal and state law enforcement agencies, according to a court filing. The investigation is focused on numerous "potential violations of federal law, including conspiracy, healthcare fraud, wire fraud, mail fraud, tax violations, identity theft [and] money laundering," Samanta Kelley, a special agent for the Food and Drug Administration's criminal division, said in an affidavit filed at the federal courthouse in Los Angeles.
NEWS
February 22, 2013 | By Jon Healey
The Federal Trade Commission opened a potentially significant new front Friday in its efforts to protect consumers against data theft. The commission announced a settlement with mobile device manufacturer HTC America that requires the company to plug security holes in millions of smartphones and tablet computers, develop a comprehensive approach to data protection and undergo independent security assessments every other year. Federal law gives the commission the authority to go after "unfair" business practices that harm consumers, and it's used that authority increasingly in recent years to crack down on companies that don't safeguard the sensitive data they collect from customers.
OPINION
August 19, 2012
Indian gambling has brought long-needed financial gains to Native American tribes as well as a measure of painful internal strife. In California, reservations where dilapidated mobile homes once dominated the landscape are now dotted with attractive new housing developments, playgrounds, and community, health and fitness centers. At the same time, according to academics and other experts on tribal affairs, gambling wealth has given new impetus to the disenrollment of thousands of California's Native Americans from their tribes by others who want to maximize their share of the money.
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