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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 22, 2013 | By Jason Felch
A ring of Southern California businesses has been illegally selling nitrous oxide for use as a recreational drug, federal and local law enforcement officials said Friday afternoon in announcing a regional crackdown. Three auto supply employees were arrested earlier in the day in a federal law enforcement sweep that included searches of 17 businesses and nine delivery vehicles linked to the ring, authorities said. A fourth suspect is still being sought. Nitrous oxide, commonly known as laughing gas, can be used for welding, as a speed booster in cars or as an as anesthetic by dentists and doctors.
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OPINION
April 23, 2012
For nearly two years, Arizona has defended SB 1070, a dangerous law that attempts to turn local law enforcement officers into federal immigration agents. The courts have repeatedly rejected Arizona's arguments that the law isn't an attempt to interfere with federal authority to regulate immigration but rather an effort to work cooperatively with Washington. On Wednesday, state officials will make a final pitch to the U.S. Supreme Court. The justices should strike down the provisions in question as an unconstitutional intrusion into the federal government's exclusive authority to make and enforce immigration laws.
BUSINESS
July 11, 2013 | By David Lazarus
Gov. Jerry Brown has signed legislation giving California consumers more protection from unfair debt-collection practices. The Fair Debt Buying Practices Act, authored by Sen. Mark Leno (D-San Francisco), requires debt collectors to verify that an obligation is real before going after consumers. Similar protections already exist at the federal level, but the state bill is more specific in its requirement that collectors go the extra mile in making sure money is owed. "Completely innocent Californians have been victimized by this industry," Leno told me. "At a time when we're coming out of a deep economic crisis, this is insult to injury for many families.
BUSINESS
February 9, 2014 | By Kenneth R. Harney
WASHINGTON - Got problems with the company that services your home mortgage - the one that collects your payments, keeps track of your escrow account and lets you know when you're late? So your monthly numbers don't look right? You got blown off by servicing personnel when you tried to get inaccuracies in your account corrected? Well, move over. You've got lots of grumpy company. As of Jan. 31, just under half of the 187,818 complaints filed with the federal watchdog Consumer Financial Protection Bureau concerned mortgage foul-ups, and the vast majority of these involved servicing, loan modification and foreclosure activities by servicers.
OPINION
August 19, 2012
Indian gambling has brought long-needed financial gains to Native American tribes as well as a measure of painful internal strife. In California, reservations where dilapidated mobile homes once dominated the landscape are now dotted with attractive new housing developments, playgrounds, and community, health and fitness centers. At the same time, according to academics and other experts on tribal affairs, gambling wealth has given new impetus to the disenrollment of thousands of California's Native Americans from their tribes by others who want to maximize their share of the money.
NATIONAL
September 18, 2012 | By John M. Glionna
An Arizona judge says police can immediately start enforcing the “show me your papers” provision of the state's controversial immigration law, marking another legal milestone in the two-year battle between Gov. Jan Brewer and the Obama administration over the handling of undocumented immigrants. The ruling by U.S. District Judge Susan Bolton on Tuesday is the first legal go-ahead for Arizona law enforcement officers to question the immigration status of people suspected of being in the country illegally.
BUSINESS
September 12, 2013 | David Lazarus
CVS Caremark insists that it's just complying with federal law by informing customers that their medical information could be "redisclosed" if they sign up for the company's prescription-drug reward program. Privacy experts, though, question whether CVS is complying with state law. "California's privacy law is stricter than federal law," said Charles Googooian, a La Canada Flintridge lawyer who specializes in medical-privacy issues. "It doesn't seem like CVS is complying with either the spirit or the letter of state law. " CVS has been scrambling to defend its ExtraCare Pharmacy & Health Rewards program since I recently reported that customers are being required to give up important federal privacy safeguards in return for up to $50 a year in store credits.
NEWS
April 12, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
More than 200 federal law enforcement officers will help local police patrol the streets of the nation's capital, and when necessary, arrest those who break local laws. The FBI, National Zoological Park Police and U.S. Defense Protective Service have signed agreements with the District of Columbia Metropolitan Police Department giving federal officers the authority to patrol areas surrounding their jurisdictions.
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