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NEWS
February 13, 2013 | By Mary MacVean
A nutrition advocacy group joined with scientists and health agencies Wednesday to ask the federal government to decide just how much sugar is “safe” in sodas, raising the bar in its crusade to curb the “dangerously high” amounts Americans consume. Drinks are the single largest source of added sugar in the diet, and the request to the FDA is one way to fight back against the “ubiquitous marketing and heavy consumption” of sugar-sweetened beverages, the executive director of the Center for Science in the Public Interest, Michael Jacobson, said at a news conference in Washington.
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BUSINESS
March 30, 2014 | By Jim Puzzanghera and Jerry Hirsch
WASHINGTON - Federal regulators twice declined to investigate faulty ignition switches in General Motors Co. cars that led to 13 deaths - even though one official found "a pattern" of problems, according to a new congressional report. The report, released Sunday, added fresh details to a controversy that has shaken the revitalized automaker. Already under fire for lengthy delays in recalling the vehicles, GM also was accused in the report of allowing the defective part to be installed in millions of vehicles after testing showed it did not meet the company's own specifications.
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BUSINESS
June 15, 1989
Cable Questions: Rep. John Dingell (D-Mich.), chairman of the House Commerce Committee, said it is time to make cable TV accountable to viewers and municipal authorities and has asked FCC Chairman Dennis R. Patrick to review the 1984 law that freed the cable industry of federal regulation. Dingell said in a speech to the Assn. of Independent Television Stations that the Cable Communications Policy Act of 1984 was based on the proposition that competition would be sufficient to protect the public interest.
OPINION
December 26, 2013 | By The Times editorial board
It's official: The Republican-controlled House and the Democrat-controlled Senate agreed on so few issues this year, Congress is on pace to pass the fewest bills in a two-year term since World War II. Pundits have compared the current occupants of Capitol Hill unfavorably to the infamous "Do-Nothing Congress" of 1947-48, which was a dynamo in comparison. Lawmakers passed 1,729 bills in that two-year term, compared to 58 in the first year of this one. Unless something changes dramatically in the second half of the 113th Congress, it will be the least productive in modern memory.
OPINION
December 26, 2013 | By The Times editorial board
It's official: The Republican-controlled House and the Democrat-controlled Senate agreed on so few issues this year, Congress is on pace to pass the fewest bills in a two-year term since World War II. Pundits have compared the current occupants of Capitol Hill unfavorably to the infamous "Do-Nothing Congress" of 1947-48, which was a dynamo in comparison. Lawmakers passed 1,729 bills in that two-year term, compared to 58 in the first year of this one. Unless something changes dramatically in the second half of the 113th Congress, it will be the least productive in modern memory.
OPINION
June 14, 2013
Re "An egg fight crosses state lines," June 9 An amendment by Rep. Steve King (R-Iowa) to the farm bill would not nullify Proposition 2, California's initiative mandating larger cages for hens that applies only to in-state production of eggs. In 2011, a federal judge blocked California's low-carbon fuel standards from taking effect because the law unconstitutionally tried to regulate activities occurring outside the state, such as producers' choices of farming methods. (The state has appealed that ruling.)
NEWS
February 5, 1989 | DAVID LAUTER, Times Staff Writer
After eight years of confrontational Reagan Administration efforts to eliminate federal regulations, the Bush Administration is discussing a series of moves that could go even further to reshape the government's oversight of major American industries. But the new Administration, less ideological than the old, will probably seek to reinstate federal controls in some areas even as it relaxes regulations elsewhere. For example, Bush's new transportation secretary, Samuel K.
NATIONAL
November 14, 2012 | By Michael Muskal
The Food and Drug Administration is seeking greater authority to regulate drug makers such as the Massachusetts company that produced steroid injections tied to a deadly outbreak of fungal meningitis, officials said Wednesday at a congressional hearing in which one of the firm's owners invoked his constitutional rights and refused to testify. Barry Cadden, a co-founder of the New England Compounding Center in Framingham, Mass., briefly appeared before the House Energy and Commerce oversight subcommittee hearing.
OPINION
February 3, 2004 | Edwin Meese III and James L. Gattuso, Edwin Meese III, former U.S. attorney general, is the Ronald Reagan Distinguished Fellow in Public Policy at the Heritage Foundation. James L. Gattuso is a research fellow in regulatory policy at Heritage.
Election watchers -- or candidates -- seeking a sleeper issue in the 2004 race for the White House might want to take a long look at the state of regulation in America. They might find, as President Reagan did, a potentially rich harvest of votes from Americans who resent paying too much for goods and services, or fear losing their jobs because of rules put in place by federal bureaucrats.
NEWS
August 29, 2012 | By Jon Healey
It's too much to ask, I know, but the speeches Tuesday night at the Republican National Convention left me hungering for a real exploration of the role government plays in helping U.S. businesses. The unifying theme of the speeches, at least in theory, was "We Built It" -- a declaration of solidarity with the entrepreneurs who create businesses without the government's assistance. To underline that point, the giant screen inside the Tampa Bay Times Forum showed the occasional video featuring a selectively edited version of one of President Obama's stump speeches.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 13, 2013 | By Ralph Vartabedian
The state's strategy of tapping $3.2 billion in federal money to begin construction of an ambitious bullet train project may be legally flawed and could put the state in financial jeopardy, key lawmakers say. After recent legal rulings that bar the use of state money for the project, legislators from both political parties say that even the use of federal funds is questionable and the entire project needs to be reassessed. U.S. Rep. Jeff Denham (R-Turlock), the chairman of the House rail subcommittee, and Rep. Tom Latham (R-Iowa)
BUSINESS
December 12, 2013 | By Ricardo Lopez
Federal regulators shut down 52 bus companies in a nationwide safety crackdown partly prompted by a February bus crash near San Bernardino that killed eight people and injured 30 others. The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration said it pulled 340 unsafe vehicles from the road after investigators found several safety problems among the bus companies it investigated.  "Bus travel is increasingly popular because it is a convenient, inexpensive option for students, groups and families," said U.S. Transportation Secretary Anthony Foxx in a statement.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 4, 2013 | By Ralph Vartabedian
In another key setback to the California bullet train project, federal regulators have rejected the state's request to exempt a large Central Valley segment of proposed track from a lengthy planning review. The action affects part of a 29-mile rail section to be built near Fresno, where state officials have already awarded a construction contract. The decision is likely to complicate, delay and substantially drive up the cost on that initial $1-billion package of work. The ruling marks the second time in nine days that the rail agency's planning process has been rejected by authorities.
NATIONAL
November 14, 2013 | By Ralph Vartabedian
After a series of fiery crashes involving trains hauling crude oil, the railroad industry called on the federal government Thursday to significantly strengthen safety standards for new tank cars and require retrofitting of the nation's huge fleet of existing tankers. Tank car safety has taken on greater urgency as the oil industry turns to rail to ship the massive increases in oil production that are occurring in shale fields not served by major pipelines, including North Dakota, Colorado and south Texas.
NATIONAL
November 12, 2013 | By Neela Banerjee
WASHINGTON - Federal regulators have fined ExxonMobil $2.6 million for spilling 210,000 gallons of oil into an Arkansas subdivision and lake in  March, citing a string of safety lapses by the oil giant going back more than a decade. The penalty levied by the Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration last week spotlights the damage caused by a spill at a time when the Obama administration weighs allowing construction of the controversial Keystone XL pipeline from Alberta, Canada, to the Texas Gulf Coast.
BUSINESS
October 1, 2013 | By Jim Puzzanghera
WASHINGTON -- Although the federal government began a partial shutdown Tuesday, most financial regulators remained on the job because their agencies are funded outside the congressional appropriations process. But the effects of the shutdown still will be felt in the financial sector -- and would increase the longer it lasts. The special mechanisms that pay for most financial regulators -- in many cases through fees on the firms they oversee -- limits the direct consequences of the shutdown on Wall Street and the banking industry.
BUSINESS
February 26, 1999 | From Associated Press
CBS Corp.'s chief executive, Mel Karmazin, said Thursday his company would be interested in buying NBC if the government eased rules that prevent one company from owning two broadcast television networks. Karmazin told a group of advertising executives at a conference in New Orleans that NBC would be a better fit with his company than NBC parent General Electric Co. He also said that if Exxon Corp. and Mobil Corp.
BUSINESS
November 19, 2012 | By Jim Puzzanghera
WASHINGTON -- Federal regulators said Monday they have opened investigations of 19 financial companies for possible violations of new mortgage advertising rules designed to keep firms from misleading consumers about reverse mortgages and other products. In addition, the regulators have sent letters to 32 other firms warning them about ads that falsely imply a connection to a government program or provide other potentially misleading information. The actions, announced Monday, came after a review by the Federal Trade Commission and the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau of about 800 advertisements by mortgage lenders, mortgage brokers and other firms outside the traditional banking system.
BUSINESS
September 23, 2013 | By Marc Lifsher
SACRAMENTO -- Federal regulators have issued proposed safety violation citations to Southern California Edison Co. and its contractor for alleged design flaws in steam generators at the San Onofre nuclear power plant. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission on Monday released the results of an inspection into the failures that led to Edison's decision in June to shutter two units at the electricity generating station near San Clemente. In January of 2012, steam tubes in one of the units began to leak and the complex was shut down.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 17, 2013 | By Chris Megerian
SACRAMENTO - The cost of providing care to elderly and disabled Californians is set to increase in about 15 months because of new federal rules on overtime. The new regulations, announced Tuesday by the U.S. Department of Labor, will require overtime pay for almost 2 million more workers nationwide, including nearly 360,000 caregivers in California's taxpayer-funded home care program. Gov. Jerry Brown's administration estimates that the overtime will cost the state an extra $150 million annually for its In-Home Supportive Services program.
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