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BUSINESS
March 28, 2008 | From the Associated Press
More than a year after millions of T.J. Maxx and Marshalls customers found out their credit card information had been hacked into, the discount stores' operator agreed to have its information audited but avoided paying federal fines. TJX Cos. was one of three firms that agreed to settle charges that each "failed to provide reasonable and appropriate security for sensitive consumer information," federal regulators said Thursday in two unrelated data-breach decisions.
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BUSINESS
March 27, 2008 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The White House named William Kovacic as the next chairman of the Federal Trade Commission, replacing Deborah Platt Majoras when she leaves office at month's end. Kovacic has served as one of the FTC's five commissioners since January 2006. He will be one of two remaining Republican commissioners after Majoras leaves.
BUSINESS
March 18, 2008 | Joseph Menn, Times Staff Writer
There's no such thing as a free plasma TV. ValueClick Inc., one of the largest Web advertising networks, will have to pay federal authorities $2.9 million for telling consumers otherwise. The civil settlement Monday with the Federal Trade Commission is the largest penalty to date under the 2003 Can-Spam Act, which forbids deceptive e-mails and unsolicited commercial come-ons that aren't clearly labeled. The case is embarrassing for publicly traded ValueClick of Westlake Village, which has been touted as a likely takeover candidate in the wake of major online advertising acquisitions by Google Inc., Microsoft Corp.
BUSINESS
February 29, 2008 | From the Associated Press
Federal Trade Commission Chairwoman Deborah Platt Majoras will resign in late March, the agency said Thursday, to handle antitrust issues for Procter & Gamble Co. Majoras will join the consumer products manufacturer as vice president and general counsel June 1, a company spokeswoman said. During her tenure at the FTC, the agency cleared P&G's $57-billion acquisition of rival consumer products company Gillette.
BUSINESS
December 21, 2007 | Jim Puzzanghera and Joseph Menn, Times Staff Writers
In approving Google Inc.'s $3.1-billion purchase of DoubleClick Inc. on Thursday, federal regulators determined that there was plenty of competition in the fast-growing Internet advertising world. But they also expressed concerns about consumer privacy in that rapidly evolving marketplace, in which companies are increasingly using technology to track people's digital footprints to follow them around the Web and target ads to their activities.
BUSINESS
November 8, 2007 | David Colker, Times Staff Writer
Have you received calls from telemarketers -- which, of course, usually come at dinner time -- even though you were on the Do Not Call registry? The Federal Trade Commission called some of these alleged violators back, and it will cost them a lot more than an evening meal. The agency said Wednesday that several companies, including such nationally known names as Ameriquest Mortgage Co. and ADT Security Services Inc.
BUSINESS
November 7, 2007 | From Reuters
A congressional hearing should be held to examine the privacy aspects of Google Inc.'s plan to buy advertising company DoubleClick, the top Republican on the House Energy and Commerce Committee said Tuesday. "Google is an information colossus already, but add on DoubleClick's marketing power and you produce a single commercial entity that can know more about you and me than nearly everybody but mom and the IRS," Rep. Joe L.
BUSINESS
November 1, 2007 | Alana Semuels, Times Staff Writer
First there was "Do Not Call." Now, if a coalition of privacy groups gets its way, there might be the Internet equivalent: "Do Not Track." The coalition asked the Federal Trade Commission on Wednesday to make it easier for people to prevent advertisers from tracking their Web surfing through what's known as behavioral targeting.
BUSINESS
October 25, 2007 | From the Associated Press
Federal regulators are continuing legal efforts to block Whole Foods Market Inc.'s $565-million takeover of rival Wild Oats Markets Inc. despite the deal's having closed in late August. The Federal Trade Commission tried to block the deal earlier this year on antitrust grounds. A federal district court ruled against the agency in August. The FTC appealed that ruling, but the U.S.
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