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WORLD
October 14, 2007 | Alexandra Zavis, Times Staff Writer
The Shiite heir apparent to a key U.S. political ally added his voice Saturday to calls for the division of Iraq into semiautonomous regions based on sect and ethnicity, throwing down a gauntlet on an issue that has stirred fierce emotions in Iraq. Ammar Hakim's appeal before hundreds of supporters gathered for prayers marking the end of the Muslim holy month of Ramadan came just weeks after passage of a nonbinding U.S.
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NATIONAL
April 8, 2014 | By Kathleen Hennessey
WASHINGTON - President Obama used his executive power and a hot-button issue to try to stoke support from a key election-year constituency Tuesday, as he issued two directives aimed at ensuring federal contractors pay women as much as men for equal work. Surrounding himself with female supporters at the White House, Obama signed an executive order prohibiting federal contractors from retaliating against employees who talk about how much money they make. Advocates say secrecy about salaries is a major contributor to the gap in average pay between male and female workers in the United States, which the White House says means women make 77 cents for every dollar earned by men. The president also ordered contractors to report data to the government showing the compensation paid to employees by gender and race.
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WORLD
August 9, 2006 | Borzou Daragahi, Times Staff Writer
They have a new constitution, a new government and a new military. But faced with incessant sectarian bloodshed, Iraqis for the first time have begun openly discussing whether the only way to stop the violence is to remake the country they have just built. Leaders of Iraq's powerful Shiite Muslim political bloc have begun aggressively promoting a radical plan to partition the country as a way of separating the warring sects.
NATIONAL
April 7, 2014 | By John M. Glionna
LAS VEGAS - Wielding signs and slogans, several hundred demonstrators rallied Monday to support beleaguered Nevada cattle rancher Cliven Bundy after authorities began to seize his cattle from federal land. Protesters had responded to an alert that promised: "Range war begins at the Bundy ranch at 9:30 a.m. We're going to get the job done!" Federal officials say Bundy is illegally running cattle in the 600,000-acre Gold Butte area, habitat of the federally protected desert tortoise.
WORLD
August 13, 2005 | Ashraf Khalil, Times Staff Writer
A proposal to establish a semi-independent state in the oil-rich Shiite Muslim heartland in southern Iraq has polarized negotiations over the country's new constitution, with a Monday deadline looming for submission of the document to parliament. Kurdish, Shiite and Sunni Arab negotiators met through the Arab weekend Friday, with the most divisive remaining roadblock the proposal for a federalist system with strong regional governments tied to a relatively weak central authority in Baghdad.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 18, 1997
For those who worry that schools today lack standards, there is some encouraging news in the American Federation of Teachers' third annual report card on states' efforts to raise the achievement bar. The Washington-based teachers union found that 49 states are developing standards for what all students should know at various grade levels. Of these, 14 have vastly improved the standards they had drafted last year. "Most states are firmly committed to raising their academic standards, and many are making good progress," said Sandra Feldman, president of the 900,000-member union.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 13, 1993
Today is Thomas Jefferson's 250th birthday, and the major local celebration is at the Huntington Library in San Marino. From the library's own holdings, research director Robert C. Ritchie and UCLA historian Joyce Appleby have assembled a small but wonderfully astute exhibit focused not on 1776 and the Declaration of Independence but on 1800, the almost equally fateful year when Jefferson was elected President.
NEWS
August 27, 1987 | JACK NELSON, Times Washington Bureau Chief
In an attempt to curb government bureaucracy, President Reagan plans to issue an executive order requiring all federal agencies and departments to assess whether proposed new programs could be more appropriately handled by state and local jurisdictions, Administration officials said Wednesday. The sweeping order, a draft of which is being circulated among U.S.
OPINION
March 20, 2012 | Jonah Goldberg
The bleating about broken government and partisanship continues. Why can't those boobs in Washington agree on anything? We're constantly told that the way to fix the country is to dethrone the left and right and empower the middle. Handing things over to these middling mincers and half-a-loafers - Americans Elect, No Labels, the "gangs" of six or 14, conservative Democrats and liberal Republicans - is supposed to be the answer to all of our problems. But what if the real compromise isn't in forcing the left and the right to heel?
NEWS
July 25, 1991 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
From Yugoslavia to Kurdistan, ethnic groups yearning for independence have appealed to the United States for support--only to find that the Bush Administration prefers the stability of existing states to the uncertainty of redrawing borders. In Yugoslavia, the rebellious republics of Slovenia and Croatia asked for recognition as independent states earlier this month and were turned down flat.
NATIONAL
April 7, 2014 | By Evan Halper
WASHINGTON - Adam Crain assumed that tapping into the computer networks used by power companies to keep electricity zipping through transmission lines would be nearly impossible in these days of heightened vigilance over cybersecurity. When he discovered how wrong he was, his work sent Homeland Security Department officials into a scramble. Crain, the owner of a small tech firm in Raleigh, N.C., along with a research partner, found penetrating transmission systems used by dozens of utilities to be startlingly easy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 6, 2014 | By Michael Finnegan, David Zahniser and Doug Smith
In January, President Obama announced a block-by-block approach to relieving poverty in Los Angeles. Federal money, he said, would pour into a newly created Promise Zone. The boundaries encompassed crowded immigrant communities around MacArthur Park and Koreatown, as well as upscale areas of Hollywood and Los Feliz. Left out was South L.A., where the poverty rate is higher. The exclusion stunned many South L.A. leaders. The strategy, presidential aides said, was to concentrate resources in communities where nonprofits or public agencies had already received one of the Obama administration's signature urban renewal grants.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 5, 2014 | Kurt Streeter
Several of Southern California's most prominent religious leaders held a vigil for immigration reform in downtown Los Angeles on Friday, underscoring a growing interfaith effort to change the nation's laws. Immigrants who are in the United States illegally "need mercy and they need justice," said Archbishop Jose Gomez, welcoming an array of Christian, Jewish and Muslim leaders to the gathering at the Cathedral of Our Lady of the Angels. Gomez, who has made changing immigration laws a hallmark of his three-year tenure leading the L.A. Archdiocese, described the current system as "totally broken," adding that federal laws punished families and children unfairly.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 4, 2014 | By Maura Dolan, Patrick McGreevy and Paige St. John
SAN FRANCISCO - For more than two decades, Leland Yee climbed the political ladder in San Francisco. A child psychologist turned politician, Yee straddled opposing camps in the city's bare-knuckled political fights, appealing to both right and left and catering to constituents with a strong, attentive staff. Elegant in appearance and charming in manner, he courted financial contributors and built a reputation as a canny pol with an enviable knack of identifying the high-profile issue of the day and then weighing in before a thicket of cameras.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 3, 2014 | By Victoria Kim
Andre Birotte Jr., the chief federal prosecutor in Los Angeles, has been nominated by President Obama to serve as a judge in the U.S. District Court for the Central District of California, the White House announced Thursday. Birotte, who has served as the U.S. attorney overseeing the nation's second-largest office since 2010, is a former Los Angeles County deputy public defender who also acted as the Los Angeles Police Department's inspector general for six years. As L.A.'s top federal prosecutor, he reinstated a public corruption and civil rights unit disbanded by his predecessor and oversaw high-profile investigations into the L.A. County jails and into state Sen. Ronald S. Calderon.
BUSINESS
April 2, 2014 | By Marc Lifsher
SACRAMENTO - Pacific Gas & Electric Co., indicted by the federal government for criminal behavior stemming from a Bay Area natural gas explosion that killed eight people and destroyed 38 homes, still faces more trouble. In the next few months, PG&E will face the likelihood of a fine from the California Public Utilities Commission as high as $2.25 billion for its role in the September 2010 disaster in the city of San Bruno. On Tuesday, the U.S. attorney in San Francisco announced that a grand jury indicted PG&E on 12 alleged violations of the federal Pipeline Safety Act involving poor record keeping and faulty management practices.
NATIONAL
February 5, 2014 | By Richard A. Serrano
WASHINGTON - "I'm hit! I'm hit!" U.S. Border Patrol Agent Brian Terry cried into the southern Arizona darkness that night, Dec. 14, 2010. "I can't feel my legs!" The 40-year-old Border Patrol agent, who was less than four years on the job, collapsed and died in the desert brush near Rio Rico. Terry's killing unraveled the Justice Department-sanctioned "Fast and Furious" gun-tracking operation and triggered one of the biggest political controversies of President Obama's first term.
BUSINESS
October 3, 2000 | E. SCOTT RECKARD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Former Lincoln Savings & Loan boss Charles H. Keating Jr. won a final victory Monday before the U.S. Supreme Court, defeating attempts to reinstate his 1991 state court conviction on charges of swindling elderly investors. Without comment, the high court refused to reopen the case, leaving intact lower court rulings that Los Angeles Superior Court Judge Lance Ito had allowed a flawed prosecution.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 2, 2014 | By Steve Chawkins
Robert L. Brosio, a retired federal prosecutor who supervised high-profile cases that included those against bank swindler Charles Keating Jr. and Los Angeles police officers who were involved in the beating of Rodney King, has died. He was 77. Brosio, who for 28 years led the criminal division of the U.S. attorney's office in Los Angeles, had a massive pulmonary embolism in February, his daughter Serena Brosio said. He died Friday at a Pasadena hospital. While he seldom argued cases in court himself, Brosio was in charge of more than 100 prosecutors and set a standard of "ramrod integrity," said Nora Manella, an associate justice of the California Court of Appeal in Los Angeles.
BUSINESS
April 2, 2014 | By Evan Halper
WASHINGTON - Airline customers complain about being mistreated daily, but Rabbi S. Binyomin Ginsberg took his grievance all the way to the U.S. Supreme Court. Unfortunately for Ginsberg, the court sided Wednesday with Northwest Airlines Inc., now merged into Delta Air Lines Inc., in a case that had put carriers on edge. The ruling strengthens the industry's hand when fighting litigation filed by disgruntled passengers by bolstering a 36-year-old federal law that limits its exposure to such claims.
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