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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 18, 1997
For those who worry that schools today lack standards, there is some encouraging news in the American Federation of Teachers' third annual report card on states' efforts to raise the achievement bar. The Washington-based teachers union found that 49 states are developing standards for what all students should know at various grade levels. Of these, 14 have vastly improved the standards they had drafted last year. "Most states are firmly committed to raising their academic standards, and many are making good progress," said Sandra Feldman, president of the 900,000-member union.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
April 27, 2014 | Times Editorial Board
Some 50 political leaders from nine Western states gathered in Salt Lake City this month to discuss plans to wrest control of millions of acres of public lands from the federal government. One wonders whether, like a dog chasing a car, they've figured out what they would do with the land if they got hold of it? In any case, that's unlikely to happen, based on decades of court battles and settled law. Nevertheless, these angry legislators and local commissioners seem determined to waste time and energy on this futile effort, propelled by a warped sense of history and priorities.
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WORLD
October 14, 2007 | Alexandra Zavis, Times Staff Writer
The Shiite heir apparent to a key U.S. political ally added his voice Saturday to calls for the division of Iraq into semiautonomous regions based on sect and ethnicity, throwing down a gauntlet on an issue that has stirred fierce emotions in Iraq. Ammar Hakim's appeal before hundreds of supporters gathered for prayers marking the end of the Muslim holy month of Ramadan came just weeks after passage of a nonbinding U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 26, 2014 | Kevin Baxter, Brian Bennett
Yasiel Puig's journey to Los Angeles - and riches with the Dodgers - is a serpentine tale of drug cartels, nighttime escapes and international human smuggling. Yet in the booming marketplace for Cuban ballplayers, it is far from unique. Since 2009, nearly three dozen have defected, with at least 25 of them signing contracts worth more than a combined $315 million. Many, like Puig, were spirited away on speedboats to Mexico, Haiti or the Dominican Republic. Once there, they typically were held by traffickers before being released to agents - for a price.
OPINION
March 20, 2012 | Jonah Goldberg
The bleating about broken government and partisanship continues. Why can't those boobs in Washington agree on anything? We're constantly told that the way to fix the country is to dethrone the left and right and empower the middle. Handing things over to these middling mincers and half-a-loafers - Americans Elect, No Labels, the "gangs" of six or 14, conservative Democrats and liberal Republicans - is supposed to be the answer to all of our problems. But what if the real compromise isn't in forcing the left and the right to heel?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 13, 1993
Today is Thomas Jefferson's 250th birthday, and the major local celebration is at the Huntington Library in San Marino. From the library's own holdings, research director Robert C. Ritchie and UCLA historian Joyce Appleby have assembled a small but wonderfully astute exhibit focused not on 1776 and the Declaration of Independence but on 1800, the almost equally fateful year when Jefferson was elected President.
NEWS
August 27, 1987 | JACK NELSON, Times Washington Bureau Chief
In an attempt to curb government bureaucracy, President Reagan plans to issue an executive order requiring all federal agencies and departments to assess whether proposed new programs could be more appropriately handled by state and local jurisdictions, Administration officials said Wednesday. The sweeping order, a draft of which is being circulated among U.S.
NEWS
July 25, 1991 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
From Yugoslavia to Kurdistan, ethnic groups yearning for independence have appealed to the United States for support--only to find that the Bush Administration prefers the stability of existing states to the uncertainty of redrawing borders. In Yugoslavia, the rebellious republics of Slovenia and Croatia asked for recognition as independent states earlier this month and were turned down flat.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 22, 2012 | By Maura Dolan, Los Angeles Times
SAN FRANCISCO - Goodwin Liu was tired and disappointed. The law professor had returned from Washington the night before, having lost his bruising 16-month battle to win Senate confirmation for a federal appeals court seat. Conservative Republicans had tarred the Obama nominee as a liberal activist, and all of Liu's efforts to dispel the label had failed. He had his key in the door to his office at UC Berkeley's law school when the telephone rang. An aide to Gov. Jerry Brown wanted to know if he would be interested in the California Supreme Court.
BUSINESS
October 3, 2000 | E. SCOTT RECKARD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Former Lincoln Savings & Loan boss Charles H. Keating Jr. won a final victory Monday before the U.S. Supreme Court, defeating attempts to reinstate his 1991 state court conviction on charges of swindling elderly investors. Without comment, the high court refused to reopen the case, leaving intact lower court rulings that Los Angeles Superior Court Judge Lance Ito had allowed a flawed prosecution.
NATIONAL
April 25, 2014 | By Maria L. La Ganga
DURHAM, Ore. - Oregon officials voted unanimously Friday to jettison the state's disastrous health insurance exchange and switch to the federal system, admitting disappointment and defeat in an arena where the state had been a trailblazer. With its 7-0 vote, the board of directors for Cover Oregon acknowledged that the state exchange was too expensive and too troubled to fix. Although the state has spent an estimated $248 million to get the operation up and running, it never enrolled a single private insurance customer online.
NEWS
April 25, 2014 | By Maria L. La Ganga
DURHAM, Ore. - Oregon officials voted unanimously Friday to jettison the state's disastrous health insurance exchange and instead switch to the federal website, admitting both disappointment and defeat in an arena where the state had been a trailblazer. With its 7-0 vote, the board of directors for Cover Oregon acknowledged that the state exchange was too expensive and too troubled to fix. Although the state has spent an estimated $248 million to get its exchange up and running, it never enrolled a single private insurance customer online.
NATIONAL
April 24, 2014 | By John M. Glionna and Richard Simon
BUNKERVILLE, Nev. - The first thing you see on the drive to Cliven Bundy's ranch are the American flags - tied to roadside guardrails, flapping in a hard desert wind. At a bend in state Route 170 sits the so-called Patriot Checkpoint, evidence of the tense power play raging between the rebellious 67-year-old cattleman and the federal government. Then there are the guns. Scores of grim citizen militiamen in combat fatigues - semiautomatic weapons slung over their shoulders, ammunition magazines at their belts - patrol from a base they call Camp Tripwire.
NATIONAL
April 22, 2014 | By Cindy Carcamo
Less than two weeks after federal officials rebuked the Albuquerque Police Department for a rash of unjustified officer-involved shootings, an officer fatally shot a 19-year-old woman suspected of stealing a vehicle before pointing a gun at police, authorities said. Mary Hawkes became the first person to be killed by Albuquerque police since the Justice Department released a scathing report that called for a "systematic change" to address what it said was a long-ingrained culture of deadly force in the Police Department.
NATIONAL
April 21, 2014 | By Timothy M. Phelps
WASHINGTON - For decades the Republican Party prided itself for being tough on crime, often putting Democrats on the defensive by pushing for longer, mandatory sentences for convicts. In 1988, that hard-line stance helped sink the presidential dreams of then-Massachusetts Gov. Michael Dukakis, who was blamed in Republican TV ads for having released convicted killer Willie Horton as part of a weekend furlough program. (Horton failed to return after a furlough and went on to commit robbery and rape.)
SPORTS
April 16, 2014 | By Sam Farmer, This post has been updated. See the note below for details
A federal judge in Philadelphia declined Wednesday to approve a proposed $765-million concussion settlement between the NFL and a group of retired players. [UPDATED, 4:30 p.m. PDT, April 16:  Although this was originally characterized as a setback for those pushing for a concussion settlement, attorneys for the plaintiffs clarified Wednesday afternoon that U.S. District Judge Anita B. Brody's ruling was more of a procedural housekeeping item. The ruling was submitted electronically late Tuesday and was announced Wednesday.
NATIONAL
November 23, 2011 | By David Willman, Washington Bureau
A Senate subcommittee chairwoman is calling for a federal review of the Obama administration's award of a $433-million sole-source contract for an experimental smallpox drug. Sen. Claire McCaskill (D-Mo.), in a news release issued Wednesday by her subcommittee, said that she has asked the inspector general of the Department of Health and Human Services to investigate. McCaskill's news release cited "serious questions" about the contract, noting that it had first been intended for only a small business and that, ultimately, it was awarded without competition to a larger company.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 4, 1990 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
From a phone at a hotel in San Diego's Mission Valley, reputed mobster Chris Petti reached out on Dec. 5, 1988, and touched prominent San Diego businessman Richard T. Silberman. Though the telephone was a public pay phone, it had been tapped--by FBI agents. In the phone conversation, Petti and Silberman chatted about laundering money they believed came from Colombian drug lords, federal prosecutors say. "The thing that was bad about the deal is it was too small. . . .
OPINION
April 15, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
Enormous public resources go to foster families and group homes, and those expenditures are appropriate because the county and state are the virtual guardians for thousands of abused and neglected children. As such, the state and the county are duty-bound to ensure that the children receive proper care and, despite any mistreatment at home and despite the turmoil of being sent to live with strangers, are put on a pathway toward a successful adulthood. But Los Angeles County also places thousands more abused or neglected children not with foster families or group homes but with their own grandparents and other relatives, and that's a good thing; numerous studies over many years show that such children do better in the long run than those in foster care - if those family members have the money to properly clothe and care for the children.
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