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ENTERTAINMENT
August 31, 1986 | KRISTINE McKENNA
"THE GOOD EARTH." The Feelies. Coyote. Like the Meat Puppets, the Feelies make laid-back guitar music with a spacey edge--new-wave folk music for yuppies. The Feelies are relatively new to this turf, having recently revamped their identity as an aggressively arty group of the brainy nerd variety. Formed six years ago by guitarists Glenn Mercer and Bill Million, the group has undergone extensive personnel changes, but its present incarnation is its most commercial to date.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 12, 2013 | By Sheri Linden
Lynn Shelton specializes in the small-scale high concept. She has an eye for delicately observed moments and casual absurdities that spin around an obvious plot engine. Like her features "Humpday" and "Your Sister's Sister," her latest Seattle-set comic drama, "Touchy Feely," is a work that gestures toward depths without truly plumbing them. In its gentle way, it's also her broadest, most schematic film. As the story of friends, family and identity crisis meanders toward its low-key feel-good conclusion, exceptionally lovely, nuanced performances by Rosemarie DeWitt and Allison Janney are the chief draw.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 25, 1991 | STEVE HOCHMAN
How fitting that the Feelies played the Stones' "Paint It Black" and the Velvet Underground's "White Light/White Heat" during their Roxy set on Tuesday. As their forebears the Velvets had done in the kaleidoscopic '60s, the Feelies, starting in the late '70s, stripped the color from the music of their day, reducing punk and new-wave styles to basic blacks, whites and grays. But at the Roxy, many colors burst forth at once in an often dynamic show.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 28, 2013 | By Noel Murray
Passion Available on VOD on Thursday. Writer-director Brian De Palma's erotic thriller is an English-language remake of Alain Corneau's "Love Crime," a film about what happens when the war of wits between a female executive and her protégée turns kinky and then deadly. But De Palma takes Corneau's film and puts his own spin on it, riffing on business ethics, cronyism, gender roles, and how modern technologies like cellphones, security cameras and the Internet are changing all of the above.
NEWS
June 20, 1991 | MIKE BOEHM, Mike Boehm covers pop music for The Times Orange County Edition.
The difference between the Feelies and Firehose is like the difference between being hypnotized and slapped in the face. Either way, the mind-set gets rearranged. The Feelies, who hail from Haledon, N.J., are gradualists, detail men (and woman, in the case of bassist Brenda Sauter), whose songs tend to unfold rather than erupt. Nuance matters with the Feelies.
NEWS
September 19, 1988
Readers of Krier's comprehensive article might be interested in knowing that the design trio of Charles Eames, George Nelson and Alexander Girard produced a multi-media cinema presentation (including "smellies") for the University of Georgia in the late '50s. The three-screen presentation, sidelined with large photo graphics, was emphasized with pertinent odors being fed through the air conditioning system of the small auditorium by Girard--exotic perfumes for the sequence of film down the Nile and incense for scenes of Gothic cathedrals.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 2, 1987 | KEVIN HENRY, Henry is a Calendar summer intern.
For most of its 63 years, the downtown Variety Arts Center was known as the Figueroa Playhouse, home to the Friday Morning Club. It hosted such vaudeville and Hollywood superstars as Ed Wynn, Dick Powell and Clark Gable. Today, rock 'n' roll has taken over. The marquee on the five-story, Italian Renaissance-style building at 940 S. Figueroa St. is devoted to acts with such colorful names as the Hoodoo Gurus, Jello Biafra, Thelonious Monster, the Red Hot Chili Peppers and the Feelies.
TRAVEL
September 26, 1999 | BOB SIPCHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
We're still at Burbank Airport on a recent Friday night when my 9-year-old son, Robert, reveals himself as a true child of the Info Age. "Dad," he says, "when we get on the plane, can I use your laptop?" "Why?" "I want to get on the Internet." "How are you going to do that?" "Doesn't it have AOL?" I figure his question, technologically sophisticated in one way, also reflects a fundamental ignorance. "Son," I say, "you need some sort of communications connection to hook up with the Internet."
ENTERTAINMENT
January 4, 1996 | MARK CHALON SMITH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The small voice in his head whispered, "Go ahead, touch it." But Jason Fletcher couldn't quite make the move. He just stood in front of the cast of Richard Nixon's face and grimaced. "I've never really liked him because of his politics and this makes me uncomfortable," Fletcher explained at the Fullerton Museum Center, where Nixon's face is part of a "Touchable Sculpture" exhibit that continues through Feb. 11.
SPORTS
December 16, 2002 | From Associated Press
Michael Vick came through, then Shaun Alexander did him one better to win the game for Seattle. After Atlanta's Jay Feely missed a 36-yard field goal in overtime, Alexander ran 27 yards for a touchdown, giving the Seahawks a 30-24 victory Sunday. "I have to shoulder this burden," Feely said. "That's my job, to make field goals." Vick, who did little right through 3 1/2 quarters, led the Falcons tie the score with a 12-yard touchdown pass to Trevor Gaylor with 17 seconds left in regulation.
BUSINESS
May 13, 2012 | Michael Hiltzik
You've heard all about how banks present a danger to the financial system once they become "too big to fail" (I'm looking at you, JPMorgan Chase). Here's the equivalent question about a much different company: Has Google become too big to trust? To ask the question is to answer it, but in case that's not explicit enough, the answer plainly is yes. It's become impossible to ignore Google's lengthening string of privacy and regulatory missteps. The company has been found by the Federal Communications Commission to have collected and kept emails and Web browsing histories, even passwords, of individuals whose Wi-Fi signals were intercepted by vehicles photographing street scenes for its Street View program.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 21, 2010 | By Nicole Sperling, Los Angeles Times
Anne Hathaway vividly recalls the first time she made out with Jake Gyllenhaal: It was on the set of 2005's "Brokeback Mountain," in which the actress played the neglected wife to Gyllenhaal's smitten cowboy, and they were filming a steamy tryst in the back seat of a car. FOR THE RECORD: "Love & Other Drugs": An article in the Nov. 21 Calendar section about Jake Gyllenhaal and Anne Hathaway's love scenes in "Love & Other Drugs" said the movie...
OPINION
November 2, 2008
Re "Confessions from the campaign trail," Column One, Oct. 28 Your reporter covering the Obama campaign bemoaned the candidate's failure to "loosen up." What did he want? A confession about his struggle to fit into his Hawaiian high school? An intimate sharing of how he wooed Michelle? His preferred shaving lotion? Beer? Barack Obama didn't get where he is today by being everybody's favorite drinking buddy. He didn't become the first black editor of the Harvard Law Review by letting it all hang out. He got where he is through watchful listening and measured actions.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 8, 2006 | Michael Sims, Special to The Times
THOMAS EAKINS created some of the most iconic images of American art. Even people who shun museums recognize the nobly lighted forehead of a surgeon turning to speak to a gallery of students while his fingers hold a bloody scalpel. You can buy a mouse pad with the glorious image of Max Schmitt sculling on Pennsylvania's Schuylkill River. Eakins was of the generation of another American original, Winslow Homer.
SPORTS
November 28, 2005 | Sam Farmer, Times Staff Writer
Spared the executioner three consecutive times, the Seattle Seahawks came away with a 24-21 victory in overtime Sunday that figured to be pivotal in their quest for home-field advantage throughout the playoffs. The executioner, meanwhile, had some explaining to do.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 18, 2004 | Paul Lieberman, Times Staff Writer
Of the Cabats, the husband, Erni, was the one who cultivated the image of the artist. He grew a handlebar mustache, shaved his head and wore look-at-me hats tilted to the side -- ski caps in the desert, for instance. Erni had some credentials too, having gotten the U.S.
OPINION
November 2, 2008
Re "Confessions from the campaign trail," Column One, Oct. 28 Your reporter covering the Obama campaign bemoaned the candidate's failure to "loosen up." What did he want? A confession about his struggle to fit into his Hawaiian high school? An intimate sharing of how he wooed Michelle? His preferred shaving lotion? Beer? Barack Obama didn't get where he is today by being everybody's favorite drinking buddy. He didn't become the first black editor of the Harvard Law Review by letting it all hang out. He got where he is through watchful listening and measured actions.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 20, 2004 | Michele Willens, Special to The Times
Men don't talk to each other. Well, OK, they talk royal flush vs. full house, Shaq vs. Kobe, Red Sox vs. Yankees. But they don't sit around, as do women, and reveal, share intimacies and frailties. Right? "That's a myth," counters writer-director Andrew Bergman, who's been meeting weekly in New York City with five men for more than two decades.
SPORTS
December 16, 2002 | From Associated Press
Michael Vick came through, then Shaun Alexander did him one better to win the game for Seattle. After Atlanta's Jay Feely missed a 36-yard field goal in overtime, Alexander ran 27 yards for a touchdown, giving the Seahawks a 30-24 victory Sunday. "I have to shoulder this burden," Feely said. "That's my job, to make field goals." Vick, who did little right through 3 1/2 quarters, led the Falcons tie the score with a 12-yard touchdown pass to Trevor Gaylor with 17 seconds left in regulation.
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