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NEWS
December 18, 1991 | BARBARA FOLEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
If you wear them, you already know. If you're about to start, be prepared. Complete strangers will burst out with opinions pro and con, mostly con, on "health" shoes. "Whenever I'm wearing my chunky, '70s-style shoes (people) come up to me and say 'Your shoes are ugly,' says Los Angeles fashion designer Maggie Barry. "I think they are offended because they're not feminine. The shoes look aggressive. Funny thing is, no one ever says that when I wear my motorcycle boots."
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NEWS
October 6, 1998 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rudyard Kipling knew the importance of good footwear to the fighting man. So does Pepe Ramirez. In his poem "Boots," Kipling provides the infantry's vision of hell on earth: It-is-not-fire-devils, dark, or anything,/But boots-boots-boots-boots-movin' up an' down again. Ramirez, a Marine Corps staff sergeant and drill instructor at the recruit depot here, has his own way of describing the same age-old devotion. "If your feet feel bad, it's not long before your head feels bad," said Ramirez.
NEWS
June 14, 1994 | ROSE-MARIE TURK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
You don't need to walk a mile in my high heels to know me. I'll make it easy: I am a 5-foot-5 brunette who believes 5-foot-8 blondes live on greener grass. I tried being blond once--with a wig--and was glad I hadn't used bleach. But standing taller is another issue, one that I won't abandon as long as there are friends like Manolo, Roger, Kenneth, Sam, Libby, Joan and David. They haven't crippled my feet, ruined my back or broken my legs.
HEALTH
August 14, 2006 | Regina Nuzzo, Special to The Times
WHEN fungus invaded her toenails 10 years ago, Ruth Carsch of San Francisco didn't care too much at first. Her nails became "thick and fat and yellow," says the 61-year-old information specialist, but she could always hide that behind colorful nail polish. What she really minded, she says, was how the nail plates grew so thick from the infection that they squashed the toes beneath. "My toes are much fatter than they used to be. My feet are wider," Carsch says. "It seems to have deformed my toes."
NEWS
January 28, 1992 | SUSAN HOWLETT, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
As a young dance student, Christie Lantz wasn't sure if she wanted to be a prima ballerina, or even if she really liked ballet. But there was one thing she was most certain of--she hated toe shoes. So when the teen-ager saw eccentric aerobics instructor Zahava teach her class barefoot , those painful ballet shoes took to the closet, and her bare feet took to the gym floor.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 12, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Though bare feet are not likely to show up in offices or schools any time soon, going shoeless is healthier for the feet, according to an article published in a medical journal. "Studies of non-shoe-wearing populations in Africa and Asia conclude that people who do not wear shoes have healthier feet, fewer deformities and have greater mobility than people in shoe-wearing societies," said Lynn Staheli, an orthopedist at Children's Hospital in Seattle.
NEWS
February 3, 1992 | PAMELA WARRICK
If the shoe fits . . . well, some women just won't wear it. In a recent survey by the USC School of Medicine and the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society, 88% of women were wearing shoes smaller than their feet. Eighty percent said their feet hurt. Is there a connection? You bet your booties, researchers say. Or, as Dr. Carol Frey of USC put it, "Most cases of bunions, hammertoes, corns and calluses in women are directly related to the shoes they wear. . . .
HEALTH
August 21, 2000 | EMILY DWASS
Do you have happy feet? This time of year, a lot of kids don't. You're running around barefoot one day, then putting on new school shoes the next. Each can spell trouble for your tootsies. First, the shoeless part: Although it's tempting to skip the shoes, it's not always a great idea. "At the beach is different than in an alley," points out Dr. William Oppenheim, head of pediatric orthopedics at UCLA.
NEWS
June 6, 2001 | BETH COONEY, STAMFORD ADVOCATE
Does sandal season make you feel like sticking your toes in the sand? Pedicures can smooth calluses, remove dry, flaky skin and give your toenails polish. If you want a fresh look, you might try this season's palette of fruity polish colors, including some electric pastel greens and blues. "We have a lot of new colors . . . things that are kind of whimsical, like Key Lime Pie, for example," says Rhonda Stefanick, pedicurist at the Noelle Spa for Beauty & Wellness in Stamford, Conn.
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