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ENTERTAINMENT
April 14, 1996
Regarding Jules Feiffer's cartoon last Sunday: Perhaps Feiffer has now become the victim of the media's long-standing love affair with his brand of humor. "Brash, oafish and ignorant" are words that aptly describe his stereotyping of Jewish men. Maybe it's time he put away his markers--they're running out of ink. MONA SHAFER EDWARDS Los Angeles If Feiffer's cartoon was intended to be funny, I, as a Jew, was not amused! If there is anything the Jewish people don't need, it's another ignorant, deprecating portrayal of us. Feiffer owes the Jews a public apology, and so do the editors of The Times, who allowed this cartoon to be published.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 20, 2013 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
"Far out isn't far enough" is the way the once-banned children's book illustrator/writer Tomi Ungerer describes his belief that creativity should have no limits, should face no boundaries. That line in the sand gives the brash new documentary on the artist its overly long and winding name - "Far Out Isn't Far Enough: The Tomi Ungerer Story. " The man we meet in this excellent examination of his controversial work would probably have gone with something pithier and more subversive.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 28, 1989
Shame on you for allowing Feiffer to degrade Calendar with his May 14 cartoon. I am not a Times buyer or subscriber, and after seeing Feiffer's outrageous cartoon I probably will never be. Who in the world wants to pay for this kind of trash? Not this hard-working mother! LUCILLE WALUND Rialto
ENTERTAINMENT
March 14, 2010 | By Josh Lambert
Backing Into Forward A Memoir Jules Feiffer Nan A. Talese/Doubleday: 450 pp., $30 Whether newspapers live or die, the prognosis for the comic strip doesn't look promising. The extinction of the form not much more than a century after its birth would represent only a very minor tragedy too, given the rise of the graphic novel -- who would shed a tear for "H├Ągar the Horrible" in the age of "Fun Home" and "Jimmy Corrigan: The Smartest Kid on Earth"? -- except it would also mean we no longer live in a world with a berth reserved for the likes of Jules Feiffer.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 21, 1996
What in the world does last week's Feiffer cartoon parodying Newt Gingrich have to do with entertainment? Why is it in Sunday Calendar? Why is Feiffer allowed to cynically editorialize? And am I wrong or in making Gingrich appear to be talking to a black person, is Feiffer himself being racist? DAVID S. WILSON Los Angeles
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 26, 1992
I'm worried! If Clinton wins, what will Conrad, Feiffer and Trudeau do for subject matter? J. DEVEREAUX LEAHY Ventura
ENTERTAINMENT
July 9, 2000
Kindly do both the cartoonist and your readers a favor: Return Maratta's "Silent Pictures" to its former size if not location. Doubling its size as a substitute for Feiffer just does not work. As a tribute to Feiffer, devote his space to more readers' comments; it will be a far better use. MARYSIA MEYLAN Santa Monica
ENTERTAINMENT
May 21, 1995
We resent the fact that in Jules Feiffer's May 7 cartoon, he assumes that people 55 years old and older don't know who Jon Secada, Sheryl Crow, Courteney Cox, Jennie Garth and Adam Ant are. On the contrary, we are not "dead in America." We happen to know very well who these people are, as we know who Benny Goodman and Glenn Miller are. Feiffer's thinking is something that has been too prevalent in this country--that anyone over 50 has "one foot in the grave." How wrong that is! Just look around the business world and see that not every executive is thirtysomething.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 22, 1995
Enough is enough. I am tired of all those sarcastic letters by Alan R. Coles. His latest, demeaning KUSC General Manager Wally Smith (Jan. 15), was especially insidious. Please exercise better judgment in your selection process or make the Feiffer cartoon bigger. ALAN R. COLES Long Beach
ENTERTAINMENT
May 30, 1999
In response to Janice LeBrun's commentary on the "Feiffer" cartoon (Letters, May 16): My dictionary defines "satire" as: the use of ridicule or irony or sarcasm in speech or writing. Feiffer wasn't making "fun" of anything in his May 9 depiction of a trench coat kid. I find it ironic that you saw the comic to be glorifying guns and low self-esteem; I saw it as the unfortunate and naked truth of how the children of our nation think in this day and age: that joining the ranks of neo-Nazism and glorifying Hitler are the only answers to their low self-esteem.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 1, 2001
The Maratta cartoon (March 11) poked fun at screenwriters. My son-in-law is a writer; he works very hard, and I admire his persistence in the face of mercurial tastes and unpredictable fashions. I don't know Maratta's background with the industry, but her cartoon showing a producer inviting a screenwriter to a premiere to sweep the lobby was not funny-it was hurtful and showed ignorance and arrogance. I have tried hard to find humor or some redeeming feature about Maratta's "Silent Pictures."
ENTERTAINMENT
July 9, 2000
Kindly do both the cartoonist and your readers a favor: Return Maratta's "Silent Pictures" to its former size if not location. Doubling its size as a substitute for Feiffer just does not work. As a tribute to Feiffer, devote his space to more readers' comments; it will be a far better use. MARYSIA MEYLAN Santa Monica
ENTERTAINMENT
June 18, 2000
As one of Feiffer's loyal readers, I find it difficult to believe and very disheartening to have this marvelous cartoon coming to an end. As a former dancer (and always a dancer at heart), the delightful dancer expressing herself with balletic movement and satire has held a special joy for me throughout the years. Turning to the last page of Calendar has been a Sunday ritual for as long as I can remember. Thank you, Jules Feiffer, for years of great joy and satire--you will be sorely missed.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 17, 2000 | JOHN J. GOLDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When he was 23 years old and living in his first apartment on the Lower East Side of Manhattan, Jules Feiffer got lucky. A modern dancer came home with him and spent the night. "She was the first girl who ever did that," Feiffer recalled with just a note of nostalgia. "You don't forget that. She has been revisiting me ever since in the cartoons." These days, the dancer--sketched differently at various times in his life to reflect past girlfriends--is disappointed.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 30, 1999
In response to Janice LeBrun's commentary on the "Feiffer" cartoon (Letters, May 16): My dictionary defines "satire" as: the use of ridicule or irony or sarcasm in speech or writing. Feiffer wasn't making "fun" of anything in his May 9 depiction of a trench coat kid. I find it ironic that you saw the comic to be glorifying guns and low self-esteem; I saw it as the unfortunate and naked truth of how the children of our nation think in this day and age: that joining the ranks of neo-Nazism and glorifying Hitler are the only answers to their low self-esteem.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 22, 1998
Like other readers, I perform a Sunday ritual by going from Feiffer to Letters to the Puzzler. I also was tempted to attack Jack Grimshaw (Letters, March 8). Now I would like to congratulate him on his foresight. I can't imagine anyone attaching the word "sociopath" to the president. Some may say he is oversexed or "horny" but frankly I couldn't care less if he kept a harem in the Lincoln bedroom. From now on I will go straight to the crossword. HAROLD R. GELFMAN Lancaster Dump Feiffer?
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