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OPINION
March 14, 2014
Re "CIA denies Senate spying claim," March 12 Anyone who fails to appreciate the supreme irony of Sen. Dianne Feinstein's (D-Calif.) righteous indignation over the CIA's alleged spying on and undermining of the Senate Intelligence Committee (of which Feinstein is chair) has not been paying attention. For years, she has been one of the intelligence community's most steadfast champions, deflecting criticism of the surveillance state, attacking whistle-blowers and justifying nearly every abuse.
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NEWS
April 7, 2014 | By Cathleen Decker
Hillary Rodham Clinton's comment last week that women face a double standard in politics raised eyebrows. And then came former CIA and NSA director Michael Hayden to prove her point. It happened in reference to Sen. Dianne Feinstein of California, who has been embroiled in a battle with the CIA over a Senate report that detailed the spy agency's actions in the wake of the Sept. 11 attacks. “If the Senate can declassify this report, we will be able to ensure that an un-American, brutal program of detention and interrogation will never again be considered or permitted,” Feinstein, who as head of the Senate Intelligence Committee has certainly been privy to the report's findings, said last month.
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NEWS
September 11, 2012 | By Michael McGough
The debate continues over whether Clint Eastwood's performance with an empty chair at the Republican National Convention was an inspired improvisation or an age-induced embarrassment. But one Republican candidate seems to find the empty chair a useful image.   Under the heading "Empty Chair Update" in an email, Elizabeth Emken, the GOP  nominee for the U.S. Senate in California, is pointing journalists toward a TV interview in which her Democratic opponent Sen. Dianne Feinstein walks away after being asked if she would debate Emken -- leaving an empty chair!
NEWS
March 31, 2014 | By Michael A. Memoli
WASHINGTON - California prevailed over Idaho on Monday in a long battle over the fate of a key judicial post, thanks largely to the Democrats' change last year to long-standing Senate filibuster rules. The Senate voted 56 to 43 to confirm John B. Owens for a seat on the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals, filling a seat that's been open since 2004 - the longest vacancy in the federal court system. Owens, who has practiced law for the Los Angeles firm of Munger, Tolles & Olson since 2012, was nominated by Obama in August.
OPINION
May 17, 2012
Re "Coming clean on drones," Opinion, May 6 Doyle McManus raised some excellent questions about congressional oversight of U.S. drone strikes. The Senate Intelligence Committee, which I chair, has devoted significant time and attention to the drone program. We receive notification with key details shortly after every strike, and we hold regular briefings and hearings on these operations. Committee staff has held 28 monthly in-depth oversight meetings to review strike records and question every aspect of the program including legality, effectiveness, precision, foreign policy implications and the care taken to minimize noncombatant casualties.
OPINION
March 21, 2013
Re "Feinstein assault weapons ban fails," March 20 We all owe Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.) great thanks for her pursuit of a federal assault weapons ban, but it is quite clear that if the horrific massacre in Connecticut in December didn't persuade Senate Republicans that these murder weapons should not be sold, nothing will. The only solution is to vote Republicans out of office and replace them with senators who can exercise common sense. I hope that Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-Nev.)
NEWS
December 18, 2012 | By Richard Simon
WASHINGTON -- When Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.) launched her drive in 1994 to win approval for an assault weapons ban, the relative newcomer to Capitol Hill walked the hallways trying to drum up support. Now, as she prepares for a new fight to pass gun control legislation,  she is likely to be doing it from a more powerful spot -- as the next head of the Senate Judiciary Committee. Feinstein, by virtue of seniority, is in line to succeed current chairman Patrick Leahy (D-Vt.)
OPINION
February 18, 2009
Re "Drones based in Pakistan," Feb. 13 It is regrettable that Sen. Dianne Feinstein's (D-Calif.) inappropriate comments have put further strain on our relationship with Pakistan and on the Pakistani government's relationship with its people, which may lead to further destabilization of that region. Only a few weeks ago, Feinstein's name was in the news for botched security arrangements at President Obama's inauguration, leading to thousands being stranded in tunnels during the festivities.
NEWS
November 11, 2012 | By Morgan Little
The fallout from David Petraeus' sudden resignation as CIA director continued Sunday, with questions about how much the White House knew, and whether there is any connection between his departure and the attack on the U.S. consulate in Benghazi, Libya. Senate Intelligence Committee Chairwoman Dianne Feinstein(D-Calif.), said Petraeus' announcement was “like a lightning bolt,” and that there was no advance notice of his decision. Appearing on “Fox NewsSunday,” Feinstein also explained her statement earlier in the week that President Obama should not have accepted Petraeus' resignation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 6, 1997
Please allow me to correct the record. The article "Feinstein Doubts Mexico's Resolve on Drugs" (Oct. 30) included a misstatement of something I said with regard to U.S. and Mexican drug cooperation. It states, "She noted that no Mexican citizens sought on U.S. criminal charges have been extradited to this country." What I said was that no Mexican citizens sought in the United States on drug-related charges have been extradited. This is important because Mexico has several dozen requests for extradition of Mexican nationals on drug-related charges but refuses to extradite any to this country to stand trial.
NEWS
March 30, 2014 | By David Willman
WASHINGTON - President Obama's proposal to balance national security and privacy concerns by stopping the government from storing records of millions of phone calls from the U.S. - on condition the data remain accessible from the telecommunications companies - won diverse backing on Sunday. Two former top-level intelligence agency officials, along with the chairwoman of the Senate Intelligence Committee, Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.), said they favored or were open to shifting the storage of the records from the National Security Agency to the companies.
OPINION
March 14, 2014
Re "CIA denies Senate spying claim," March 12 Anyone who fails to appreciate the supreme irony of Sen. Dianne Feinstein's (D-Calif.) righteous indignation over the CIA's alleged spying on and undermining of the Senate Intelligence Committee (of which Feinstein is chair) has not been paying attention. For years, she has been one of the intelligence community's most steadfast champions, deflecting criticism of the surveillance state, attacking whistle-blowers and justifying nearly every abuse.
NATIONAL
March 13, 2014 | By David Horsey
California Sen. Dianne Feinstein's accusation that the CIA has illegally spied on Congress has caused everyone from South Carolina's hawkish Republican Sen. Lindsey Graham to on-the-run whistle-blower Edward Snowden to weigh in. Feinstein, a Democrat, chairs the Senate Intelligence Committee. She claims there is evidence that the CIA conducted surveillance on committee staffers who were looking through classified documents related to the spy agency's interrogation and detention practices during the administration of President George W. Bush.
NATIONAL
March 12, 2014 | By Ken Dilanian
WASHINGTON - This is not Robert Eatinger's first run through a full-blown CIA controversy. But it's his most public ordeal. For most of his career, few outside the world of espionage knew of Eatinger, 56, who has spent 22 years moving up the ranks to become the CIA's top lawyer. But in a scathing speech Tuesday, Sen. Dianne Feinstein, the head of the Senate Intelligence Committee, accused him of trying to impede a Senate investigation into a notorious CIA detention and interrogation program that Eatinger had helped manage.
NEWS
March 11, 2014 | By Ken Dilanian
WASHINGTON -- Sen. Dianne Feinstein, the head of the Senate Intelligence Committee, and CIA Director John Brennan sparred Tuesday over the lawmaker's allegation that agency officials secretly had searched Senate computers, an act she said had undermined congressional intelligence oversight and may have violated the law. "I have grave concerns that the CIA search may well have violated the separation-of-powers principles,"  Feinstein said on...
NEWS
March 11, 2014 | By Ken Dilianian
WASHINGTON -- Sen. Dianne Feinstein, the head of the Senate Intelligence Committee, escalated a behind-the-scenes dispute with the CIA by publicly accusing the spy agency of secretly searching a Senate computer system, an act she said undermines congressional intelligence oversight and may have violated the law. The expanding dispute has opened a rift between the CIA and the Senate committee that oversees it and often has defended it. Already, some...
NEWS
March 11, 2014 | By Ken Dilanian
WASHINGTON -- Sen. Dianne Feinstein, the head of the Senate Intelligence Committee, and CIA Director John Brennan sparred Tuesday over the lawmaker's allegation that agency officials secretly had searched Senate computers, an act she said had undermined congressional intelligence oversight and may have violated the law. "I have grave concerns that the CIA search may well have violated the separation-of-powers principles,"  Feinstein said on...
BUSINESS
October 8, 2012 | By Tiffany Hsu
Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.) is calling for a federal investigation to determine whether “an illegal short squeeze” is responsible for the soaring price of gasoline in California, which hit another record high Monday. With a regular gallon now costing $4.669, the third all-time high in a row, Feinstein is urging the Federal Trade Commission to look into doubts that “the price spike and supply disruption are related to supply and demand,” she said. In a letter Sunday to Jon Leibowitz, the agency's chairman, Feinstein accused the FTC of “failing to take action to protect California consumers from malicious trading schemes in the California gasoline market.” In the letter, Feinstein referenced data showing statewide gasoline production last week at nearly the same levels as a year ago. She also pointed to reports demonstrating that stockpiles of gasoline and blending components were equal to last year's.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 20, 2014 | By Dan Weikel
U.S. Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.) will be on hand Thursday for the debut of a sophisticated rail safety system for Metrolink, a technology she pushed for following the deadly Chatsworth crash in 2008. Feinstein, a sponsor of the Railway Safety Improvement Act, will be among local dignitaries, Metrolink board members and Federal Railroad Administration officials who have been invited to the unveiling of the commuter line's positive train control system. PHOTOS: Metrolink crash in Chatsworth Metrolink, which serves six Southern California counties and carries about 42,000 passengers a day, is the first commuter railroad in the nation to put the sophisticated collision avoidance system into operation.
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