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Felicia Marcus

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OPINION
September 2, 1990 | Jane Fritsch, Jane Fritsch is City Hall reporter for The Times. She interviewed the Felicia Marcus on a rare Sunday afternoon when the commissioner was able to take time off from work
When Felicia Marcus went off to Harvard to major in East Asian studies, the echoes of 1960s activism had grown faint. It was the pre-yuppie mid-1970s, an unsettling time for young people who witnessed the passion of the Vietnam generation but arrived at adulthood too late to make a difference. Marcus, now 34, followed an Establishment path: Harvard, Capitol Hill, New York University Law School.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 28, 1999 | COLL METCALFE
In a strongly worded letter, Assemblywoman Sheila Kuehl (D-Santa Monica) is objecting to Rocketdyne's inclusion on a committee looking into contamination at the defense contractor's Santa Susana Field Laboratory near Simi Valley. Kuehl said in a letter to Felicia Marcus, regional director of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, that because Rocketdyne is the subject of the committee's inquiry it should not be included on the panel, known as the inter-agency working group.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 20, 1989
Mayor Tom Bradley on Monday nominated environmentalist and attorney Felicia Marcus to replace Kathleen Brown on the Los Angeles Board of Public Works, the commission that oversees sewers, waste treatment facilities and other city amenities. Brown is resigning July 1 to campaign full time for the office of state treasurer. Marcus, 33, is a founder of Heal the Bay, the environmental organization dedicated to cleaning up sewage-plagued Santa Monica Bay. She also works with several other environmental organizations and is director of litigation for Public Counsel, which coordinates legal services for the underprivileged.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 7, 1991
Prominent environmental activist Felicia Marcus was elected president of the Board of Public Works on Wednesday, replacing Steve Harrington, who died last month. Appointed to the Public Works board in 1989, Marcus, 35, founded Heal the Bay, the organization credited with pressuring the city to develop a plan for better managing the dumping of raw sewage into Santa Monica Bay.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 7, 1991
Prominent environmental activist Felicia Marcus was elected president of the Board of Public Works on Wednesday, replacing Steve Harrington, who died last month. Appointed to the Public Works board in 1989, Marcus, 35, founded Heal the Bay, the organization credited with pressuring the city to develop a plan for better managing the dumping of raw sewage into Santa Monica Bay.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 28, 1999 | COLL METCALFE
In a strongly worded letter, Assemblywoman Sheila Kuehl (D-Santa Monica) is objecting to Rocketdyne's inclusion on a committee looking into contamination at the defense contractor's Santa Susana Field Laboratory near Simi Valley. Kuehl said in a letter to Felicia Marcus, regional director of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, that because Rocketdyne is the subject of the committee's inquiry it should not be included on the panel, known as the inter-agency working group.
NEWS
December 31, 1989 | CONNIE KOENENN
Activist Felicia Marcus has put her environmental law degree to work full-time. "I've gone into mega-management," she announced from the City Hall office she occupies as one of Los Angeles' five commissioners of public works. They oversee a five-bureau, 5,000-employee department that is responsible for the city's sewers, waste treatment facilities, garbage, street maintenance and other housekeeping activities.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 6, 1988 | KEVIN RODERICK, Times Staff Writer
Acting quickly to quell a fresh environmental controversy for Los Angeles Mayor Tom Bradley, Deputy Mayor Mike Gage said Tuesday that a leading critic of the city's sewage dumping in Santa Monica Bay will be appointed to a vacancy on the Environmental Quality Board.
NEWS
June 16, 1989 | CONNIE KOENENN, Times Staff Writer
Felicia Marcus lives only a block from the Santa Monica Bay, yet she rarely gets over to see it. That's because she has been so busy trying to save it. Marcus is an environmental activist and lawyer--neither especially remarkable on the issue-oriented Westside. But in addition to belonging to a myriad of environmental groups, she is a founder of Heal the Bay, the burgeoning volunteer organization that has successfully pressured the City of Los Angeles to stop dumping sewage sludge into the ocean.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 9, 1999 | ANNA GORMAN
The city of Ventura is slated to receive a $200,000 award from the Environmental Protection Agency next week. The Brownfield Demonstration Pilot grant will pay for an environmental assessment of the west side. Under the pilot program, community groups and developers will discuss environmental safety and cleaning up contaminated areas. The grant is part of an $11-million effort to clean up and redevelop distressed areas nationwide.
OPINION
September 2, 1990 | Jane Fritsch, Jane Fritsch is City Hall reporter for The Times. She interviewed the Felicia Marcus on a rare Sunday afternoon when the commissioner was able to take time off from work
When Felicia Marcus went off to Harvard to major in East Asian studies, the echoes of 1960s activism had grown faint. It was the pre-yuppie mid-1970s, an unsettling time for young people who witnessed the passion of the Vietnam generation but arrived at adulthood too late to make a difference. Marcus, now 34, followed an Establishment path: Harvard, Capitol Hill, New York University Law School.
NEWS
December 31, 1989 | CONNIE KOENENN
Activist Felicia Marcus has put her environmental law degree to work full-time. "I've gone into mega-management," she announced from the City Hall office she occupies as one of Los Angeles' five commissioners of public works. They oversee a five-bureau, 5,000-employee department that is responsible for the city's sewers, waste treatment facilities, garbage, street maintenance and other housekeeping activities.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 20, 1989
Mayor Tom Bradley on Monday nominated environmentalist and attorney Felicia Marcus to replace Kathleen Brown on the Los Angeles Board of Public Works, the commission that oversees sewers, waste treatment facilities and other city amenities. Brown is resigning July 1 to campaign full time for the office of state treasurer. Marcus, 33, is a founder of Heal the Bay, the environmental organization dedicated to cleaning up sewage-plagued Santa Monica Bay. She also works with several other environmental organizations and is director of litigation for Public Counsel, which coordinates legal services for the underprivileged.
NEWS
June 16, 1989 | CONNIE KOENENN, Times Staff Writer
Felicia Marcus lives only a block from the Santa Monica Bay, yet she rarely gets over to see it. That's because she has been so busy trying to save it. Marcus is an environmental activist and lawyer--neither especially remarkable on the issue-oriented Westside. But in addition to belonging to a myriad of environmental groups, she is a founder of Heal the Bay, the burgeoning volunteer organization that has successfully pressured the City of Los Angeles to stop dumping sewage sludge into the ocean.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 6, 1988 | KEVIN RODERICK, Times Staff Writer
Acting quickly to quell a fresh environmental controversy for Los Angeles Mayor Tom Bradley, Deputy Mayor Mike Gage said Tuesday that a leading critic of the city's sewage dumping in Santa Monica Bay will be appointed to a vacancy on the Environmental Quality Board.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 6, 1998
The Palos Verdes Peninsula Land Conservancy will receive a $5,000 grant for an elementary school curriculum, federal officials announced. The grant, awarded by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency under the National Environmental Education Act, will enable the conservancy to train teachers and parent volunteers in the Palos Verdes Peninsula Unified School District to adapt lessons on local habitats. The conservancy is required to raise matching funds.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 22, 2000
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency said Tuesday it will give $250,000 in grants to a group of 10 cities in Southeast Los Angeles County, as well as $500,000 to the city of Carson, to clean up contaminated vacant lots called "brownfields." Part of the EPA's Brownfield Economic Development Initiative, the seed money is intended to help cities assess the costs of cleaning up the abandoned sites.
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