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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 1, 2003 | Janet Wilson, Times Staff Writer
Brendan Butler was a skinny honor student from Idaho who wanted some help killing two acquaintances. Instead, he ended up dead, and three members of a Lake Forest family well known in youth sports have been charged in connection with his murder. Such is the strange and sketchy tale that emerged Monday in court papers and interviews. Butler, 20, was one of four adopted children of a local family in the mountain and lake country of Coeur D'Alene, Idaho.
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NEWS
February 14, 1993 | JOSH GETLIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was just another tragedy in family court. A young crack mother, desperate to conceal her pregnancy, had locked herself in a tenement bathroom and given birth to a three-pound boy. As she pushed, he fell to the floor and broke his skull. The mother abandoned him, like she had two previous babies. All were born addicted to crack. "Can we do anything about this woman?" asks Judge Judith Sheindlin, her voice taut with anger.
HOME & GARDEN
September 10, 2010 | By Lauren Beale, Los Angeles Times
TV and movie executive Paula Hart and her husband, Leslie Gilliams, have bought a Malibu estate for $2.6 million. The couple had been renting and were already in escrow on another house when they saw the ocean-view contemporary Mediterranean. Drawn by the high-tech and green features, including a central vacuum, solar power, tankless water heaters and well-water irrigation, they canceled the other purchase. Built in 2007, the house includes a den, media room, four bedrooms and six bathrooms in 5,000 square feet.
NEWS
September 23, 2001 | This story was reported and written by Times staff writers Michael A. Hiltzik, David Willman, Alan C. Miller, Eric Malnic, Peter Pae, Ralph Frammolino and Russell Carollo
As 19 hijackers made their way along the concourses at three East Coast airports on Sept. 11, bent on executing the deadliest terrorist attack in history, they were subjecting the U.S. aviation security system to its most critical test. At almost every step along the way, the system posed no challenge to the terrorists--not to their ability to purchase tickets, to pass security checkpoints while carrying knives and cutting implements nor to board aircraft.
NEWS
December 11, 1988 | BOB BAKER, Times Staff Writer
Elias Lopez never had a chance. He got sucked into something so much stronger than he was, something with a history so powerful, that there seemed no choice but to submit. He was 17, a nice, quietly handsome young man with jet-black hair and a plan. He was going to be a cop, a narcotics investigator. Sure, there were street gangs in his neighborhood, but he did not want to join one. All Elias wanted to do was look like a gang member.
SPORTS
November 7, 1989 | EARL GUSTKEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the spring and early summer of 1984, I watched two teen-agers in the selection process for the U.S. Olympic boxing team who looked to me like future superstars. As it turned out, neither made the Olympic team that year--1984 was too soon for them. But both left the impression that they were champions in early development. One was Mike Tyson, a 17-year-old pounder from Upstate New York who was still learning to box. An unpolished diamond.
SPORTS
May 17, 1987 | THOMAS FERRARO, United Press International
Joe Paterno shifts uncomfortably on the couch of his office at Penn State University and makes a confession about his holier-than-thou image. "It scares the heck out of me," booms the hallowed football coach. "Because I know I'm not that clean. Nobody is that clean." "I don't want to appear to be any more than I am," says Paterno, now speaking in a near whisper. "And that's a good, hard-working coach who is a decent guy, a family guy, who doesn't want to cheat." "I lose my temper sometimes.
NEWS
August 17, 1989 | JEFFREY S. KLEIN
The Murphy bed has fallen off the wall into the unprotected legal world of generic words. It landed in the same category as once-protected trademarks such as aspirin, thermos, escalator and nylon. For those of you who don't recognize the name, you may recall seeing a Murphy bed as the focus of slapstick comedians, such as Charlie Chaplin and the Marx Brothers. It is a bed concealed in a wall closet. At the turn of the century, William Lawrence Murphy invented and manufactured the first such bed.
NEWS
September 30, 2000 | RANDY HARVEY
I had a dream last night. The Dream Team lost. The U.S. men's basketball team was leading by two points in the Olympic semifinals, time was running out, Lithuania's Sarunas Jasikevicius shot a three-pointer with Antonio McDyess charging at him, the ball went in, and a delirious crowd of 14,653 at the SuperDome, many wearing their tie-dyed Grateful Dead T-shirts, charged onto the floor and carried the winners off on their shoulders. THE DREAM TEAM LOST! I said it was a dream.
BUSINESS
December 10, 2013 | By Michael Hiltzik
Having taken a fair amount of heat from the science-based community for her recent show promoting scare stories about an important immunological vaccine, Katie Couric has backed off.  In a piece appearing Tuesday in the Huffington Post, the TV host conceded that some of the criticism that the segment was " too anti-vaccine and anti-science" was "valid...in retrospect. " She acknowledged that "m ore emphasis should have been given to the safety and efficacy of the HPV vaccines.
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