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SPORTS
May 17, 1987 | THOMAS FERRARO, United Press International
Joe Paterno shifts uncomfortably on the couch of his office at Penn State University and makes a confession about his holier-than-thou image. "It scares the heck out of me," booms the hallowed football coach. "Because I know I'm not that clean. Nobody is that clean." "I don't want to appear to be any more than I am," says Paterno, now speaking in a near whisper. "And that's a good, hard-working coach who is a decent guy, a family guy, who doesn't want to cheat." "I lose my temper sometimes.
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NEWS
August 17, 1989 | JEFFREY S. KLEIN
The Murphy bed has fallen off the wall into the unprotected legal world of generic words. It landed in the same category as once-protected trademarks such as aspirin, thermos, escalator and nylon. For those of you who don't recognize the name, you may recall seeing a Murphy bed as the focus of slapstick comedians, such as Charlie Chaplin and the Marx Brothers. It is a bed concealed in a wall closet. At the turn of the century, William Lawrence Murphy invented and manufactured the first such bed.
NEWS
April 30, 1989 | GEORGE ESPER, Associated Press
The war was still raging that day 15 years ago when Vietnamese nuns heard the cries of a baby boy stuffed in a garbage can and took him inside their orphanage to raise. Today, Nguyen Thanh Binh, the son of a black American who went home and a Vietnamese mother who abandoned him, shares the plight of thousands of Amerasian youths languishing in the decay of Vietnam, desperately trying to get out and find their fathers. "My circumstances are miserable," says Lam Anh Hong, 18, whose mother gave her away to a relative.
NEWS
March 19, 2012 | By Christopher Reynolds, Los Angeles Times staff writer
You don't want Michael P. Ghiglieri writing about your next vacation. Ghiglieri, an Arizona river guide, Vietnam vet, ecology Ph.D. and seasoned emergency medical technician, is also the co-author of “Over the Edge: Death in Grand Canyon,” an epic collection of cautionary tales from perhaps America's most iconic national park. In the 10 years since the book's publication, it has sold more than 250,000 copies. Now Ghiglieri and co-author Thomas M. Myers are back with a second edition , thicker than the first.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 26, 2001 | JEAN GUCCIONE and SUE FOX, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
It's been almost a year, but Benjamin Markowitz still has trouble believing his childhood friends could have kidnapped and killed his younger brother. "In my worst nightmares, I never would have thought that that would have happened," Markowitz, 23, said last week in an interview. It was a brazen crime that stunned the West Valley, where most of the young suspects had grown up. They'd played baseball together on the well-groomed fields of a private league.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 14, 2000 | RICHARD CHRISTIANSEN, CHICAGO TRIBUNE
In the new and endearing movie "Billy Elliot," an 11-year-old boy from northeastern England decides, against all odds, that he wants to be a ballet dancer. His widowed father and older brother, both tough coal miners on strike, at first hate the very idea of Billy's dancing, believing that it means he's unmanly. But Billy, a tough and stubborn kid, perseveres and, in the end, reaches his goal. Is this a likely story?
NEWS
August 7, 1991 | SCOTT HARRIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A decade ago, many people considered Jack Bailey the best of men. He was praised as a humanitarian who had aided thousands of Southeast Asian refugees, hailed as a hero who had given desperate people a chance to live. One missionary called him "the most genuinely compassionate man I ever met." Then that Jack Bailey seemed to all but vanish, sinking into the murky realm where Americans haunted by Vietnam try to raise the dead--the presumed dead, that is.
NEWS
April 21, 1999 | JULIE CART and ERIC SLATER and STEPHEN BRAUN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Laughing as they killed, two youths clad in dark ski masks and long black coats fired handguns at will and blithely tossed pipe bombs into a crowd of their terrified classmates Tuesday inside a suburban high school southwest of Denver, littering halls with as many as 23 bodies and wounding at least 25 others.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 15, 2006 | Dennis McLellan, Times Staff Writer
Florence "Rusty" Tullis, the strong-willed biker mother of a son with a rare disfiguring disease, who was portrayed by Cher in the 1985 movie "Mask," has died. She was 70. Tullis died of an infection Saturday at Beverly Hospital in Montebello about a month after being injured in a motorcycle accident, her niece, Helen Cunningham, said Tuesday. Tullis was driving a three-wheeled motorcycle through an intersection in Azusa on Oct.
NEWS
October 17, 1991 | LIANNE HART and TRACY WOOD, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In the deadliest shooting spree in U.S. history, a man crashed his pickup truck into a cafeteria crowded with lunchtime patrons here Wednesday afternoon and began firing rapidly and indiscriminately with a semiautomatic pistol, killing 22 people. The gunman later was found dead of a gunshot wound in a restaurant restroom, police said. The massacre resulted in injuries to 20 others, many of them listed in "very critical condition."
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