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November 3, 1985 | Richard Eder, Richard Eder is a Times critic and contributor based in Boston
The other day, outside my downtown window, some 2,000 people ran by. That is not strictly true, in fact. It was the start of a 10-mile race and the runners had not had time to really get going. They were packed in from curb to curb the length of Charles Street, which is short. A shopkeeper thoughtfully placed a record player in his doorway to blast out the theme music from "Chariots of Fire." It was the only available image, canned, of the free heart.
July 17, 1999 | FRED ALVAREZ
Low-income housing developer Rodney Fernandez is one of six community leaders selected from across the country to participate in a fellowship program launched this year to promote the creation of affordable housing and community development. Fernandez, executive director of the Saticoy-based Cabrillo Economic Development Corp., was named to the inaugural class of the James A. Johnson Community Fellows program during a ceremony Thursday in Washington, D.C.
July 16, 2013 | By Gerrick D. Kennedy
For more than two decades, Nas' prolific career has been a hallmark for hip-hop, and now Harvard University has established a fellowship in the lyricist's honor.   The W.E.B. Du Bois Institute at Harvard University and the Hip-Hop Archive announced the Nasir Jones Hip-Hop Fellowship on Tuesday. The goal of the fellowship is to provide chosen scholars and artists with an opportunity to show that “education is real power.” The mission of the Hip-Hop Archive, according to the announcement, is to seek projects from scholars and artists that build on the rich and complex hip-hop tradition; to respect that tradition through historically grounded and contextualized critical insights; and most important, to represent one's creative and/or intellectually rigorous contribution to hip-hop and the discourse through personal and academic projects.   RELATED: 'Life is Good' for hip-hop's Nas Personal projects of fellows may include manuscripts, performance pieces, album work, curriculum planning, primary archival research and exhibition preparation.
Kobey's Swap Meet founder Monte Kobey died early Tuesday of complications resulting from AIDS. He was 54. Kobey, who built his swap meet into one of the state's most successful flea markets, contracted the AIDS virus from a tainted blood transfusion during open heart surgery in 1984. Since its founding at the Midway Drive-In in 1977, Kobey's Swap Meet has become an institution for many San Diegans.
October 2, 2010 | By Claudia Eller and Ben Fritz, Los Angeles Times
After several years of delays that have frustrated eager fans, moviegoers might soon be able to return to Middle-earth. Warner Bros., its subsidiary New Line Cinema and partner Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer appear to be close to greenlighting the hugely anticipated two-part "Lord of the Rings" prequel "The Hobbit," according to several people familiar with the matter who spoke on condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to discuss it publicly....
April 15, 1997
Deadline for applying for the 1997 Los Angeles Philharmonic Fellowships for Excellence in Diversity is April 25. The fellowships, ranging from $500 to $2,000, will be awarded to musicians between the ages of 16 to 30 who come from underrepresented ethnic groups among orchestras in the United States. Auditions for string, woodwind, brass and percussion instrumentalists are scheduled at the Music Center May 10.
April 25, 1991 | Associated Press
The Carter Center has named a new fellowship program for Rep. Mickey Leland, who died in an airplane crash in 1989 while working to promote development in famine-plagued Ethiopia. Former President Jimmy Carter announced the Mickey Leland Community Development Fellowships on Tuesday. He said that Leland, a Democrat from Texas, "tried to break down the almost insuperable obstacles" between people in the United States and in the Third World.
August 7, 1996 | DAVID E. BRADY
Two graduate students at Cal State Northridge have become the first recipients of $2,000 fellowships aimed at minorities pursuing careers in engineering, the university has announced. Esther Lewis and Martha Sayre will receive the first GTE A.F. Ratcliffe Minority Graduate Fellowships, an honor named for A.F. "Rick" Ratcliffe, dean emeritus of CSUN's College of Engineering and Computer Science.
September 5, 1991
Jana Westran , a recent Harvey Mudd College graduate, has received a $12,000 General Electric Foundation Fellowship for her first year of graduate school. She plans to study for a Ph.D in organic chemistry at the University of Illinois. The fellowships are to help women and minorities establish academic careers in engineering and the sciences.
July 5, 1990
Four students interested in film careers have won fellowships that will allow them to work at Paramount Pictures for a year. According to M. Kenneth Suddleson, a Paramount executive vice president, the students are the first winners of two new fellowship programs--the Paramount Pictures Fellowships and the Paramount Pictures/Eddie Murphy Fellowships--established last year.
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