Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsFelonies
IN THE NEWS

Felonies

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 19, 1996
A speedy-trial plan implemented earlier this year at the downtown Los Angeles Criminal Courts Building has sharply cut the time it takes for three-strikes cases to move through the system, according to a report released Wednesday. From start to finish in Superior Court, the average third-strike case took 86 days in 1996, according to the report from Judge James Bascue, the supervising judge at the courthouse.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 24, 1997 | BETH SHUSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
City Council members Laura Chick and Mike Feuer said Thursday that their embattled colleague Mike Hernandez should resign and that they will seek changes in the City Charter compelling the removal of any council member who admits committing a felony. In an interview Thursday evening, Hernandez said he will not step down voluntarily. The 1st District councilman, who has admitted addictions to alcohol and cocaine, was arrested in August and charged with felony possession of the drug.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 25, 1997
Angry residents of the 1st District on Wednesday reiterated calls for City Councilman Mike Hernandez to resign after his public admission of drug addiction and vowed to start a recall campaign if he did not voluntarily step down. "We call on everyone in the community to join us in a recall effort," said Albert Molina, president of a Highland Park neighbors group, in a news conference on the steps of City Hall.
SPORTS
February 9, 1991 | JERRY HICKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Reacting in part to the recent arrest of former USC quarterback Todd Marinovich, the Orange County District Attorney's office announced Friday it will file felony charges instead of misdemeanors against first-time offenders caught with small amounts of cocaine. In the past, only misdemeanor charges were filed if the amount possessed was less than a gram. Chief Deputy Dist. Atty.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 18, 1992 | JAMES QUINN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The first person to be sentenced under the state's new felony "stalking" law was ordered jailed Tuesday by a Van Nuys judge who said the man went looking for his ex-girlfriend again as soon as he got out of a drug clinic. Mark D. Bleakley, 30, a burly former carwash manager with a decade-long record of assault and weapons-possession charges, faces up to two more years in prison for violating the terms of his probation, which was imposed for violating the stalking law a first time.
NEWS
November 18, 1997 | From Associated Press
Martial arts movies to the contrary, hands and feet are not deadly weapons that automatically increase the punishment for assault, the state Supreme Court ruled Monday. The crime of assault with a deadly weapon requires use of "an object extrinsic to the body," the court said in a unanimous decision.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 26, 1996 | ANNA CEKOLA and GREG HERNANDEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A homeless man known as "crazy Richard," convicted of kidnapping and molesting two Buena Park boys in 1995, was sentenced to 540 years to life in prison Friday under the state's "three strikes" law, one of the longest sentences in county history. Richard Michael Schulz, 53, was convicted by a judge in August of molesting the boys, two friends ages 11 and 12, on two different days in Buena Park. Deputy Dist. Atty.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 19, 1996 | GREG KRIKORIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
People can talk all they want about how justice prevails and how, in the end, the truth will win out. But sometimes we can look at the same set of facts in a case, can agree on every detail and still not agree on what it all means. What then are we to make of the case of Nigel Fitzgerald Hall?
Los Angeles Times Articles
|