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NEWS
September 6, 2011 | By Lisa Mascaro
A Democratic-led Senate panel dramatically increased federal disaster aid in the wake of Hurricane Irene and FEMA's budget shortfalls, setting up an almost certain showdown with the GOP-controlled House whose leaders have sought to limit disaster help unless it can be offset with spending cuts elsewhere in the federal budget. The Federal Emergency Management Agency is expected to run out of disaster aid in a matter of months, and it has already begun to prioritize which victims will receive federal assistance.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NATIONAL
September 23, 2013 | By Matt Pearce
A man who was missing and presumed dead after Colorado's historic flooding has turned up alive, officials said Monday. The 46-year-old man from Drake, north of Boulder, had been spotted in his cabin just before floodwaters claimed it, Larimer County sheriff's spokesman John Schulz said. "He told us that he was able to climb out of a window just prior to the home being washed away," Schulz said. Officials also said Monday that of the 1,200 people unaccounted for after floods deluged Colorado this month, only six remained missing.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 3, 2013 | By Christine Mai-Duc and Joseph Serna
The federal government has pledged to reimburse up to 75% of the costs associated with fighting the Powerhouse fire in the Santa Clarita area, the Federal Emergency Management Agency announced. State officials requested FEMA's help over the weekend when the fire, encouraged by 100-degree heat, single-digit humidity and strong winds, expanded to nearly 20,000 acres in a day. The cost of fighting the fire has already reached $2.7 million, officials said. At the time of the request, the communities of Green Valley, Lake Elizabeth and Lake Hughes were threatened.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 3, 2013 | By Christine Mai-Duc and Joseph Serna
The federal government has pledged to reimburse up to 75% of the costs associated with fighting the Powerhouse fire in the Santa Clarita area, the Federal Emergency Management Agency announced. State officials requested FEMA's help over the weekend when the fire, encouraged by 100-degree heat, single-digit humidity and strong winds, expanded to nearly 20,000 acres in a day. The cost of fighting the fire has already reached $2.7 million, officials said. At the time of the request, the communities of Green Valley, Lake Elizabeth and Lake Hughes were threatened.
OPINION
December 4, 2005
My church is the largest center for food distribution to the needy in Los Angeles. Every Saturday we distribute food to between 400 and 500 people. I am saddened that in November, FEMA's contribution to us was drastically cut and will probably continue to be lower next year. The government continues to prune the FEMA budget. Food banks all over the country are experiencing scarcities. Those who contribute food and money to these banks need to be aware of this. ANN MAUPIN Los Angeles
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 4, 2010 | By Catherine Saillant
Tens of thousands of homeowners in Southern California are being forced to buy costly flood insurance because new maps issued by a federal agency say they live in a high-risk flood area. The federal government has informed property owners in more than 150 cities and unincorporated areas in Los Angeles, Orange, Ventura, Riverside and San Bernardino counties about the new requirement. Most live near rivers and creeks, below dams or in low- lying areas that are at greater risk of flooding than previously believed, according to maps developed by the Federal Emergency Management Agency.
OPINION
November 3, 2006
Re "GOP at a loss? Karl Rove has an 11th-hour plan to win," Oct. 29 The Times' argument that White House political advisor Karl Rove has the ability to direct the actions of the Federal Emergency Management Agency is incorrect. The article also illustrates a fundamental misunderstanding of FEMA's role in disasters and the timeline under which it operates. In the case of the recent Buffalo snowstorm, where The Times says Rove played a pivotal role, FEMA was asked by the New York governor to issue an emergency declaration, which the agency promptly did. FEMA dispatched dozens of staff from its office in New York City to operations centers in both Buffalo and Albany on the first day of the disaster.
NEWS
August 27, 2012 | By Christi Parsons
WASHINGTON -- Seven years after Hurricane Katrina slammed into the Gulf Coast, federal officials say they are embracing the most important lesson they learned from that catastrophe as they brace for Tropical Storm Isaac: collaborate, early and often. "The biggest lesson we've learned is that we have to work together as a team at the state and federal level," Craig Fugate, director of the Federal Emergency Management Agency, told reporters during a conference call Monday. "We've learned those lessons," he said, "to not wait to start talking to each other.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 9, 1994
In reference to the article "Hammers in Full Swing," (Sept. 27) homeowners were not held at bay for months by pending aid checks from the Federal Emergency Management Agency to perform "big home-repair jobs." The FEMA Disaster Housing Assistance Program provides either temporary rental assistance or mortgage and rental assistance to eligible disaster-affected homeowners and renters. Homeowners with dwellings that can be made temporarily livable for up to $10,000 may be provided a home repair grant in lieu of other forms of assistance.
NATIONAL
January 19, 2006 | From Associated Press
Former FEMA director Michael D. Brown on Wednesday accepted a greater share of the blame for the government's failures after Hurricane Katrina, saying he fell short in conveying the magnitude of the disaster and in calling for help. "I should have asked for the military sooner. I should have demanded the military sooner," Brown told a gathering of meteorologists at a ski resort in the Sierra Nevada.
NATIONAL
February 6, 2013 | Tina Susman
The mud and floodwaters that ravaged the East Coast when Superstorm Sandy roared ashore three months ago have been supplanted by a sea of red tape, leaving thousands of residents and businesses in limbo as they await insurance funds or help from the federal government. Some have used savings or loans to get back into their homes or reopen businesses. Others remain in temporary housing or hotels, or face the winter in frigid, unfinished housing, resulting in a staggered state of recovery that bodes ill for a region trying to make itself whole again.
NATIONAL
November 9, 2012 | By Joseph Serna, Molly Hennessy-Fiske and Shashank Bengali
MIDDLETOWN, N.J. -- In a sign of how long the rebuilding effort in the Northeast will take, the Federal Emergency Management Agency is shipping in temporary, manufactured homes for displaced residents. About 317,000 people across the region have registered for FEMA assistance, and an estimated $314 million has been allocated for about 61,000 recipients, mostly for rental assistance. The cost and number of registrants is expected to grow. At least 110 people were killed and thousands displaced since Superstorm Sandy caused an estimated $50 billion in damage and economic loss from the Carolinas inland to the Ohio Valley and all the way north to Maine.
NATIONAL
November 2, 2012 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske
POINT PLEASANT, N.J. -- The woman was standing in front of her waterlogged ranch house with the man from FEMA  when he told her the bad news, probably the worst a mother of two could hear after a storm sends 4 feet of water into her living room.  This house is unlivable, he said. The odor alone is unlivable.  Then he left.   VIDEOS: East Coast hit by deadly storm Lori Rebimbas, 41, walked into her cul de sac on Riviera Court late Thursday and asked her neighbor, a widow whose home also flooded but who has a second story to retreat to, what she should do.  "We need help," Rebimbas said, eyes wide.
NATIONAL
November 1, 2012 | By Seema Mehta and Kathleen Hennessey
BRIGANTINE, N.J. - As relief workers began clearing up the devastation of Hurricane Sandy, President Obama and Mitt Romney avoided overt partisan politics Wednesday. But with a mere six days to go before election day, and early voting underway across the nation, it was impossible to view the men's actions without a political lens. Obama traveled to New Jersey to survey damage and appear alongside Gov. Chris Christie, a Republican who is among Romney's highest-profile surrogates and who typically offers scathing criticism of the president.
NEWS
October 31, 2012 | By Jon Healey
Liberals and their media allies have argued that the political lesson of super storm Sandy is that it shows the value of big government , at least when it's working properly. They've also pounced on GOP presidential candidate Mitt Romney, who said during one of the Republican debates last year that he'd send the Federal Emergency Management Agency's functions back to the states. (Romney's campaign said this week that he actually wants to keep FEMA; I'll leave it to you to decide whether that's simply a clarification or an event-driven flip-flop.)
NEWS
October 31, 2012 | By Paul Thornton
The unwritten political rule when disaster strikes is that campaigns take a back seat, far behind recovery efforts. Such is the case with super storm Sandy, as both presidential campaigns put their official electioneering efforts on hold while the tempest slammed the East Coast this week. Putting the storm into political context was left to pundits and other professional opinionators . But where the candidates and their on-the-record surrogates kept mum as the storm rolled on shore in New Jersey and New York, L.A. Times readers brought politics to the fore.
NATIONAL
October 4, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
The federal government is not immune from lawsuits claiming many Gulf Coast hurricane victims were exposed to potentially dangerous fumes while living in trailers it provided, a federal judge ruled in New Orleans. U.S. District Judge Kurt Engelhardt cited evidence that the Federal Emergency Management Agency delayed investigating complaints about formaldehyde levels in its trailers because it might be held legally responsible. The preservative can cause breathing problems and is classified as a carcinogen.
NEWS
March 12, 1994 | JOHN CHANDLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an early sign that Cal State Northridge may avoid past earthquake recovery pitfalls, federal officials are promising to help pay for upgrading many CSUN buildings to modern seismic standards instead of authorizing only "patch-and-paint" repairs. Although the latter was a common response to past disasters, the Federal Emergency Management Agency earlier this month adopted a new repair policy for public facilities damaged in the Northridge earthquake.
NATIONAL
October 30, 2012 | By Christi Parsons
President Obama took the rare step of granting major-disaster declarations to New York and New Jersey without a full federal assessment, clearing the way more quickly for direct grants to individuals hit hardest by former Hurricane Sandy. The president determined after consultations with officials in those states that the damage was extensive enough to merit a “verbal declaration,” Craig Fugate, administrator of the Federal Emergency Management Agency, said Tuesday afternoon.
NEWS
August 27, 2012 | By Brian Bennett
WASHINGTON - Emergency officials breathed a sigh of relief as the center of Tropical Storm Isaac moved past Tampa and the site of the Republican National Convention, but planners ramped up preparations in New Orleans and the Gulf Coast as the storm appeared to gather strength and march toward Louisiana and Mississippi. The National Weather Service said the New Orleans could be in the path of the storm, which is projected to become a Category 1 hurricane by the time it makes landfall on the Gulf Coast late Monday or early Tuesday.
Los Angeles Times Articles
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