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Female Sexual Dysfunction

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HEALTH
April 28, 2003 | Valerie Reitman, Times Staff Writer
"They have Viagra," says the woman in the advertisement. "Now we have Avlimil." The ad for the herbal supplement, which promises "an enhanced libido" and a "more frequent and satisfying climax," is among the first campaigns touting pharmacological remedies for a condition called "female sexual dysfunction." Others promise to follow, as researchers at companies such as Pfizer Inc. and Procter & Gamble Co.
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NEWS
January 3, 2012 | By Melissa Healy, Los Angeles Times/For the Booster Shots Blog
A woman's sexual satisfaction does not require high levels of sexual desire--and in fact, does not require sexual activity at all, according to a new study that finds rates of sexual satisfaction highest among the youngest and oldest women it surveyed. A study published Tuesday in the American Journal of Medicine found that in a group of more than 800 women between age 40 and 100, those under 55 and those over 80 were most likely to declare themselves satisfied with their sex lives.
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HEALTH
June 5, 2000
People in need of authoritative medical information on sexual health now have two new Web sites to contact. The American Foundation for Urologic Disease, a nonprofit organization, launched a Web site (http://www.impotence.org) last month. The site was created and is maintained by medical experts. It includes a chat area monitored by a physician, information about various treatments and a confidential registry for patients to receive regular updates on medical options.
HEALTH
June 28, 2010 | By Jessica Pauline Ogilvie, Special to the Los Angeles Times
A "little pink pill" to solve women's sexual problems probably won't be hitting drugstore shelves anytime soon. But that doesn't mean discussion of the need for it, or lack thereof, is likely to end. On June 18, an advisory panel for the Food and Drug Administration recommended against the approval of flibanserin, which had been touted as a female Viagra. The FDA can accept or reject the panel's advice but usually chooses to follow it. In many drug approval proceedings, that would be the end of the matter.
NEWS
January 3, 2012 | By Melissa Healy, Los Angeles Times/For the Booster Shots Blog
A woman's sexual satisfaction does not require high levels of sexual desire--and in fact, does not require sexual activity at all, according to a new study that finds rates of sexual satisfaction highest among the youngest and oldest women it surveyed. A study published Tuesday in the American Journal of Medicine found that in a group of more than 800 women between age 40 and 100, those under 55 and those over 80 were most likely to declare themselves satisfied with their sex lives.
NEWS
May 23, 1985 | DAVID HALDANE, Times Staff Writer
A group of physicians associated with Memorial Medical Center of Long Beach has opened a clinic for the diagnosis and treatment of sexual dysfunction in men and women. Although many area clinics treat male sexual dysfunction, centers equipped to diagnose and treat sexual problems of women are rare, said Dr. Allan Shanberg, director of the Memorial Center for Sexual Function, which opened Monday. "Roles are changing," said Shanberg, a staff urologist at the medical center.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 20, 1999 | LEONORE TIEFER and CAROL TAVRIS, Leonore Tiefer is a sex researcher and therapist; Carol Tavris is a social psychologist
Viagra is doing so well for men--especially for men in the pharmaceutical industry--that legions of sexologists and urologists are trying to find a way to market it to women. If men have erectile dysfunction, though, what do women have? There must be something comparable. It's only fair. Accordingly, a new category of disorder is now being promoted, "female sexual dysfunction," or FSD.
MAGAZINE
October 2, 2005 | Anne-Marie O'Connor, Times staff writer Anne-Marie O'Connor last wrote for the magazine about hit men of the Tijuana drug cartel.
Dr. Jennifer Berman was the golden newcomer to the burgeoning world of women's sexual health when, in 2001, UCLA lured her from Boston University with a prestigious fellowship and groomed her to open its Female Sexual Medicine Center. Her promise of an innovative approach to an array of disorders grouped under the newly minted term "female sexual dysfunction" had rocketed her to the forefront of the hunt for a drug to enhance female sexual pleasure.
HEALTH
February 12, 2001 | SHARI ROAN, TIMES HEALTH WRITER
Jennifer and Laura Berman didn't go looking to become torchbearers for the female sexuality movement so much as it came looking for them. When the two sisters--one a urologist, the other a psychotherapist--set up practice together at a low-profile Boston urology clinic in 1998, their goal was to improve the treatments available for women suffering from sexual disorders. Their timing, as it turned out, was perfect.
NEWS
May 5, 2000 | MIKE DOWNEY
A friend of mine--a woman--phoned Wednesday to ask if I had happened to see what the federal Food and Drug Administration had just approved. "A new food?" I asked, excitedly. "A new drug!" I was told. Now it was my friend who sounded excited, and I told her so. "Funny you should mention that," she said. "Because that's the whole point."
SCIENCE
May 5, 2007 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Sexual desire among female cancer survivors wasn't enhanced by the use of a skin cream containing the hormone testosterone, according to new research from the Mayo Clinic published this week in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute. The cream was no more effective than a placebo treatment in improving libido in 150 post-menopausal cancer survivors in a trial. The team said the result might be explained by low levels of estrogen, a female hormone, among the study participants
HEALTH
September 11, 2006 | Mary Beckman, Special to The Times
THE little blue pill known as Viagra is keeping many men in pleasure, and for a while there was hope that it would do the same for women. But now researchers know that women need something different to improve their desire for sex, and their enjoyment of it. "A number of compounds effective in men have limited utility in women," says Dr. Taylor Segraves, a psychiatrist at Case Western School of Medicine in Cleveland.
MAGAZINE
October 2, 2005 | Anne-Marie O'Connor, Times staff writer Anne-Marie O'Connor last wrote for the magazine about hit men of the Tijuana drug cartel.
Dr. Jennifer Berman was the golden newcomer to the burgeoning world of women's sexual health when, in 2001, UCLA lured her from Boston University with a prestigious fellowship and groomed her to open its Female Sexual Medicine Center. Her promise of an innovative approach to an array of disorders grouped under the newly minted term "female sexual dysfunction" had rocketed her to the forefront of the hunt for a drug to enhance female sexual pleasure.
HEALTH
April 28, 2003 | Valerie Reitman, Times Staff Writer
"They have Viagra," says the woman in the advertisement. "Now we have Avlimil." The ad for the herbal supplement, which promises "an enhanced libido" and a "more frequent and satisfying climax," is among the first campaigns touting pharmacological remedies for a condition called "female sexual dysfunction." Others promise to follow, as researchers at companies such as Pfizer Inc. and Procter & Gamble Co.
NEWS
September 16, 2002 | KATHLEEN KELLEHER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"I have said that I could live the rest of my life without ever having sex again," mused a lithe, stylish West Los Angeles mother of two who has been with her husband for 17 years. "Then when I have sex and get into it, it surprises me. I think oh, this is great." The woman said that she doesn't know why her interest in sex has diminished so dramatically.
HEALTH
February 12, 2001 | SHARI ROAN, TIMES HEALTH WRITER
Jennifer and Laura Berman didn't go looking to become torchbearers for the female sexuality movement so much as it came looking for them. When the two sisters--one a urologist, the other a psychotherapist--set up practice together at a low-profile Boston urology clinic in 1998, their goal was to improve the treatments available for women suffering from sexual disorders. Their timing, as it turned out, was perfect.
SCIENCE
May 5, 2007 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Sexual desire among female cancer survivors wasn't enhanced by the use of a skin cream containing the hormone testosterone, according to new research from the Mayo Clinic published this week in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute. The cream was no more effective than a placebo treatment in improving libido in 150 post-menopausal cancer survivors in a trial. The team said the result might be explained by low levels of estrogen, a female hormone, among the study participants
HEALTH
September 11, 2006 | Mary Beckman, Special to The Times
THE little blue pill known as Viagra is keeping many men in pleasure, and for a while there was hope that it would do the same for women. But now researchers know that women need something different to improve their desire for sex, and their enjoyment of it. "A number of compounds effective in men have limited utility in women," says Dr. Taylor Segraves, a psychiatrist at Case Western School of Medicine in Cleveland.
HEALTH
June 5, 2000
People in need of authoritative medical information on sexual health now have two new Web sites to contact. The American Foundation for Urologic Disease, a nonprofit organization, launched a Web site (http://www.impotence.org) last month. The site was created and is maintained by medical experts. It includes a chat area monitored by a physician, information about various treatments and a confidential registry for patients to receive regular updates on medical options.
NEWS
May 5, 2000 | MIKE DOWNEY
A friend of mine--a woman--phoned Wednesday to ask if I had happened to see what the federal Food and Drug Administration had just approved. "A new food?" I asked, excitedly. "A new drug!" I was told. Now it was my friend who sounded excited, and I told her so. "Funny you should mention that," she said. "Because that's the whole point."
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