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Ferenc Gyurcsany

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WORLD
September 30, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
Parliament elected one of Hungary's wealthiest businessmen as prime minister, ending two months of political uncertainty. Ferenc Gyurcsany was chosen by a vote of 197 to 12 to succeed Peter Medgyessy, who was forced out in August in a confrontation with the Socialist-led governing coalition.
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WORLD
March 22, 2009 | Times Wire Reports
Hungary's prime minister stunned the country by announcing his resignation, saying he had become an "obstacle" to the reforms needed to pull the nation out of its worst financial crisis since the end of communism nearly 20 years ago. Ferenc Gyurcsany, of the ruling Socialists, made the unexpected announcement at his party's congress, saying he was keeping a pledge made in January 2008 to change leadership if the beleaguered party's popularity failed...
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WORLD
August 26, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
The ruling Socialist Party chose one of Hungary's richest businessmen to become prime minister. Ferenc Gyurcsany, a centrist reformer who was sports minister, still requires parliament's approval to become the head of government. Gyurcsany would replace Peter Medgyessy, who announced last week that he was stepping down after a small coalition partner withdrew support when he tried to fire a Cabinet member it backed.
WORLD
March 16, 2009 | Associated Press
Several thousand people held anti-government protests in the Hungarian capital during a national holiday Sunday, and police detained 35 people. Dressed in riot gear, the police chased some of the protesters through the streets of Budapest and prevented them from reaching the parliament building, where violent protests had taken place in 2006. At one point, tear gas was used to drive back a small group of demonstrators that tried to attack police lines near St. Stephen's Basilica.
WORLD
March 22, 2009 | Times Wire Reports
Hungary's prime minister stunned the country by announcing his resignation, saying he had become an "obstacle" to the reforms needed to pull the nation out of its worst financial crisis since the end of communism nearly 20 years ago. Ferenc Gyurcsany, of the ruling Socialists, made the unexpected announcement at his party's congress, saying he was keeping a pledge made in January 2008 to change leadership if the beleaguered party's popularity failed...
WORLD
March 16, 2009 | Associated Press
Several thousand people held anti-government protests in the Hungarian capital during a national holiday Sunday, and police detained 35 people. Dressed in riot gear, the police chased some of the protesters through the streets of Budapest and prevented them from reaching the parliament building, where violent protests had taken place in 2006. At one point, tear gas was used to drive back a small group of demonstrators that tried to attack police lines near St. Stephen's Basilica.
WORLD
October 9, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
Tens of thousands of anti-government protesters called for the ouster of the Socialist prime minister because of his admission on a leaked tape that he had lied to Hungary about the economy. Protesters who have gathered outside parliament pressing for the removal of Prime Minister Ferenc Gyurcsany since Sept. 17 were joined Friday by the nation's largest center-right opposition group, which promised to continue the rallies until Gyurcsany is ousted.
WORLD
March 16, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
Hungarian police and rioters clashed in Budapest after thousands of people rallied to demand that Socialist Prime Minister Ferenc Gyurcsany resign. The opposition rally in the capital had been peaceful, but fighting flared when protesters later tried to prevent the arrest of one of their leaders. Water cannon and tear gas were used to clear the streets of several thousand mostly far-right radicals who threw stones at police and set fire to trash cans and a barricade.
OPINION
October 14, 2006
Re "Hungary on the brink," Opinion, Oct. 7 One wonders about Andras Gollner's impartiality when he labels Hungary's opposition Fidesz party as dangerously anti-democratic. He conveniently sidesteps the harsh truth revealed in the leaked tape recording in which Prime Minister Ferenc Gyurcsany admits that his party had publicly lied about its financial mismanagement of the country to win the election. Despite the outrage and spontaneous demonstrations that this provoked across the country, Gyurcsany not only refuses to resign, but the Stalin-era style constitution makes it practically impossible to remove him from office.
WORLD
November 4, 2004 | From Reuters
Hungary will withdraw its 300 troops from Iraq by the end of March, government officials said Wednesday. Hungary is the first of the new European Union states that had joined the U.S.-led occupation of Iraq to announce a formal withdrawal date, although the mandate of the troops, who form a transport battalion, had been due to expire at year's end. The new withdrawal date will require a two-thirds majority vote in parliament.
WORLD
September 30, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
Parliament elected one of Hungary's wealthiest businessmen as prime minister, ending two months of political uncertainty. Ferenc Gyurcsany was chosen by a vote of 197 to 12 to succeed Peter Medgyessy, who was forced out in August in a confrontation with the Socialist-led governing coalition.
WORLD
August 26, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
The ruling Socialist Party chose one of Hungary's richest businessmen to become prime minister. Ferenc Gyurcsany, a centrist reformer who was sports minister, still requires parliament's approval to become the head of government. Gyurcsany would replace Peter Medgyessy, who announced last week that he was stepping down after a small coalition partner withdrew support when he tried to fire a Cabinet member it backed.
WORLD
September 21, 2006 | From Times Wire Services
Thousands of protesters outside the parliament vowed Wednesday to keep up pressure on the prime minister to resign over a leaked recording of him acknowledging that his government lied about the economy to win reelection. Budapest has been on edge since protests Monday and Tuesday turned violent in the most serious disturbances since a 1956 uprising against Soviet occupiers. "We will come back tomorrow, and the day after, and the day after. As long as we have to.
WORLD
December 6, 2004 | From Associated Press
A proposal to give citizenship to ethnic Hungarians in neighboring countries failed at the polls Sunday, pleasing the nation's prime minister, who said the idea could hurt Hungary's economy. An estimated 2.5 million ethnic Hungarians live in neighboring countries, the result of the post-World War I dismantling of the Austro-Hungarian Empire, when Hungary lost two-thirds of its territory and 60% of its population in the Treaty of Trianon.
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