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Fernando Gutierrez Barrios

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 31, 2000 | MARY BETH SHERIDAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Fernando Gutierrez Barrios, a legendary spy chief who was linked to some of Mexico's bloodiest cases of repression but was also praised for maintaining political stability, died Monday. He was 73. The longtime security expert died after undergoing surgery following a heart attack, his office said. Gutierrez Barrios was one of the pillars of Mexico's 20th century political system, which was built around the Institutional Revolutionary Party, or PRI.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 31, 2000 | MARY BETH SHERIDAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Fernando Gutierrez Barrios, a legendary spy chief who was linked to some of Mexico's bloodiest cases of repression but was also praised for maintaining political stability, died Monday. He was 73. The longtime security expert died after undergoing surgery following a heart attack, his office said. Gutierrez Barrios was one of the pillars of Mexico's 20th century political system, which was built around the Institutional Revolutionary Party, or PRI.
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NEWS
June 30, 1999 | MARY BETH SHERIDAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For three decades, Fernando Gutierrez Barrios was Mexico's spymaster. He helped Fidel Castro--and also helped U.S. agents monitor Cuba. At home, Gutierrez Barrios directed the security police--feared agents who "disappeared" scores of guerrillas. Gutierrez Barrios has been a repressor. A back-room negotiator. But now, at 71, he is taking on perhaps his oddest role: democrat.
NEWS
June 30, 1999 | MARY BETH SHERIDAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For three decades, Fernando Gutierrez Barrios was Mexico's spymaster. He helped Fidel Castro--and also helped U.S. agents monitor Cuba. At home, Gutierrez Barrios directed the security police--feared agents who "disappeared" scores of guerrillas. Gutierrez Barrios has been a repressor. A back-room negotiator. But now, at 71, he is taking on perhaps his oddest role: democrat.
WORLD
September 6, 2004 | From Associated Press
Two candidates were in a close race for the governor's seat in Veracruz, preliminary returns showed early today. A loss would be a blow to the former ruling Institutional Revolutionary Party, or PRI, which has held the state since the party's creation in 1929. With 56% of the votes counted, the PRI's Fidel Herrera, a 55-year-old lawyer and senator, had 33.
NEWS
January 5, 1993 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an effort to improve the government's human rights image--and possibly its record--President Carlos Salinas de Gortari on Monday replaced his attorney general and his interior secretary, the official who oversees elections and political reform. Salinas also named one of his oldest friends, Emilio Lozoya Thalmann, as secretary of energy and mines, immediately raising speculation about the race to succeed the president in 1994.
NEWS
April 6, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Armored vehicles rolled into Michoacan state as opposition supporters were ousted Thursday from city halls they had shut down in December to dramatize election fraud charges against Mexico's ruling party. By midday there were reports that demonstrators from the Democratic Revolutionary Party (PRD) had been dislodged from seven of the 17 city halls closed since the disputed elections.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 10, 1997 | JORGE G. CASTANEDA, Jorge G. Castaneda is a political scientist and writer in Mexico City. His latest book, a biography of Che Guevara, will be published this year
So, finally Carlos Salinas de Gortari has provided an explanation of why things went wrong in Mexico in 1994. The former president, who for five years won applause and fame all over the world for being the Latin leader Americans loved to like, has become the Mexican all his compatriots love to hate. After 16 months in self-imposed exile and disgrace, Salinas has decided to fight back and justify himself in a newspaper interview. He probably should have kept quiet.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 2, 1988 | JORGE G. CASTANEDA, Jorge G. Castaneda is a graduate professor of political science at the National University of Mexico and a co-author of "Limits to Friendship: the United States and Mexico" (Alfred A. Knopf, 1988).
Carlos Salinas de Gortari's inaugural process can be most accurately defined by the links between its three elements: the appointment of the new cabinet, the opposition's reaction and his inaugural address. In themselves the three chapters, while including a few surprises, were hardly spectacular.
NEWS
December 2, 1988 | MARJORIE MILLER, Times Staff Writer
Amid street protests and an opposition walkout, Carlos Salinas de Gortari was sworn in as president of Mexico on Thursday and said in his inaugural address that the country's debt burden is "unacceptable and unsustainable." In a measured style but employing strong language, Salinas said that Mexico cannot continue current payments on its $104-billion foreign debt and hope to turn around its stagnant economy. He ordered his treasury secretary to negotiate a new deal with international creditors.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 19, 1999 | DENISE DRESSER, Denise Dresser is a visiting fellow at the Pacific Council on International Policy at USC
Mexico's Revolutionary Institutional Party (PRI) has taken a bold step by opening up the selection process of its presidential candidate to a nationwide primary, but, ironically, the process may backfire because a hard-line, anti-democratic candidate could emerge the winner. The reform is a radical change in the PRI's standard operating procedures, but does not necessarily portend a happy ending to Mexico's democratic transition.
NEWS
January 30, 1990 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The opposition Democratic Revolutionary Party on Monday charged that 56 of its members and supporters have been killed in political violence during the 18 months since the party's leader, Cuauhtemoc Cardenas, ran for president and forged the new leftist force. At least 16 of the victims died in the last month after hotly contested elections in the poor farming states of Guerrero and Michoacan, both strongholds of Cardenas.
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