Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsFernando Ramos Da Silva
IN THE NEWS

Fernando Ramos Da Silva

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
August 27, 1987 | BURT A. FOLKART, Times Staff Writer
The youthful protagonist in the film "Pixote," a dark tale of children reduced to theft and prostitution in order to survive on the streets of Brazil, has been killed in a shoot-out with police, it was reported Wednesday. Fernando Ramos da Silva was 12 when he appeared in Brazilian director Hector Babenco's poignantly repulsive tale of desperation, and was 19 when he was killed Tuesday.
ARTICLES BY DATE
Advertisement
NEWS
September 20, 1987
The tragic conclusion of the life of Fernando Ramos da Silva, star of the movie "Pixote" ("The Short Life, Bitter Death of Pixote" by William R. Long, Sept. 4), is a poignant reminder of how strong the grip of poverty is. We in the West like to pat ourselves on the back for all our concern for the world's less fortunate. But this is the question that must be asked: Have we offered lasting solutions? Here was a boy pulled from the decay of a Brazilian slum and given the starring role in a movie about a boy in those very same conditions.
NEWS
September 4, 1987 | WILLIAM R. LONG, Times Staff Writer
Fernando Ramos da Silva, the angel-faced street urchin catapulted to fame in an acclaimed 1980 movie about abandoned children, was not only a star, but a symbol of hope in Brazil. "Pixote," the oppressively sad portrait of a boy swept by the currents of his sordid environment into an ugly urban whirlpool of crime and violence, reflected real-life triumph for the 11-year-old Sao Paulo slum kid who played the title role so convincingly.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 23, 1992 | MARK CHALON SMITH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Anyone who looks at a newspaper or strolls by a TV set knows how dangerous life can be for inner-city children. Random violence and poverty make for a tough, resourceful adversary. With all the reports on drive-by shootings and economic helplessness in South-Central Los Angeles and elsewhere, we know it's bad here in the States. And if we think about it, we know it's bad, if not worse, in even poorer countries.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 28, 1996 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A highlight of the closing week of the AFI Film Fest is the Tuesday 8 p.m. screening at LACMA of "The Life and Death of King Richard III" (1912), the oldest known American feature film extant, which was recently donated to the AFI Archive at the Library of Congress. Noted Shakespearean actor Frederick Warde stars, and the Robert Israel Ensemble will provide accompaniment.
NEWS
December 25, 1987 | STAN LEHMAN, Associated Press Writer
For years, Paulo Collen was one of the tens of thousands of dirty-faced, barefoot and undernourished children who prowl the streets, stealing and begging to stay alive. But at 18, he has beaten the odds. Collen today not only has a job at a civil engineering firm, he has written a book that has called nationwide attention to the millions of abandoned children in Brazil.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 4, 1988 | MICHAEL WILMINGTON
Mira Nair's "Salaam Bombay!," surprise smash hit and Camera D'Or winner at the last Cannes Film Festival, is a brilliant, passionate new film that gives us Indian city life in ways we rarely see it. Much as Hector Babenco ("Pixote"), Francois Truffaut ("The 400 Blows") and Bunuel ("Los Olvidados") before her, Nair shows us her city through the eyes of its youth: the homeless street urchins, some as young as 4, who crowd Bombay's streets by the thousands. But Nair herself is no urchin.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 4, 1999 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Artist Jessica Bronson, whose video installations and related works are on display at the Museum of Contemporary Art (250 S. Grand Ave., downtown L.A.), will introduce Andy Warhol's newly restored "Outer and Inner Space" (1965) tonight at 6:30 in the museum's Ahmanson Auditorium.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 10, 2004 | Anne-Marie O'Connor, Times Staff Writer
Brazilian director Hector Babenco had always been known as an outsize personality, reveling in his role as a Hollywood outsider who has strafed the big studios with his maverick talents while luring some of America's brightest stars -- Jack Nicholson, William Hurt, Meryl Streep -- even when he could pay almost nothing. Now he was fighting for his life.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|