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NEWS
June 5, 1995 | MICHAEL G. WAGNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Three UC Irvine fertility specialists profited at the expense of the university, their patients and insurance companies by receiving cash payments and failing to report nearly $1 million in income, according to an independent audit released Sunday.
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NEWS
June 7, 1995 | MICHAEL GRANBERRY and TRACY WEBER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In the letter that prompted UC Irvine to launch a full-scale inquiry into its Center for Reproductive Health, three whistle-blowers paint a graphic picture of what they call "wrong, likely illegal and highly improper" procedures, according to documents obtained by The Times on Tuesday. Most of the accusations involve Dr. Ricardo H.
NEWS
July 19, 1995 | TRACY WEBER and MICHAEL G. WAGNER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Despite mounting evidence of improper human egg transfers at UC Irvine's famed fertility clinic, Chancellor Laurel L. Wilkening told auditors to hold off pursuing the allegations in May, 1994, according to confidential university documents. The documents contradict Wilkening's statements about when she first learned of the improper egg transfers and raise questions about her role in the unfolding scandal.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 28, 1996 | JULIE MARQUIS
UC Irvine will host a four-day ethics conference on reproductive medicine next month in the wake of a human egg-swapping scandal that drew international headlines and rocked the infertility field. University officials said the conference was organized to make a "positive contribution" to the field and to confront issues raised by allegations against three doctors at UCI's now-closed Center for Reproductive Health. The trio--Ricardo H. Asch, Jose P.
NEWS
May 20, 1995 | TRACY WEBER and LESLIE BERKMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Orange County district attorney's office is trying to determine whether one of the nation's foremost fertility experts broke any laws in the handling of human eggs at his multimillion-dollar UC Irvine clinic. Investigators are particularly interested in whether Dr. Ricardo H.
NEWS
February 2, 1995 | MARLA CONE, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
Offering new evidence that could support a fiercely debated theory that male fertility is decreasing because of environmental pollution, French researchers reported today that average sperm counts of Parisian men have declined by one-third in the last 20 years. The analysis of more than 1,300 healthy men at a Paris sperm bank confirms the findings of several other European studies that sperm volumes have decreased dramatically over the last 50 years.
NEWS
July 17, 1999 | RICHARD MAROSI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Attempting to recoup millions of dollars spent on legal settlements, the UC Board of Regents voted Friday to sue the doctors who ran the scandal-ridden fertility clinic at UC Irvine. The regents want Ricardo H. Asch, Jose P. Balmaceda and Sergio C. Stone to reimburse them for more than $19 million that the university has agreed to pay infertile couples who sought help at the once acclaimed but now defunct Center for Reproductive Health.
NEWS
October 1, 1997 | GREG HERNANDEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Federal prosecutors charged Tuesday that Dr. Sergio Stone and his two partners at UC Irvine's Center for Reproductive Health were "partners in crime" who lied on medical documents to dupe insurance companies and reap extra profits. But Stone's defense attorney told a U.S. District Court jury that "the wrong person is on trial" and insisted that his client has broken no laws.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 23, 1996 | JULIE MARQUIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dr. Ricardo H. Asch, a key figure in the UC Irvine fertility clinic scandal, concluded four days of sworn testimony Monday, acknowledging the grief of patients whose eggs and embryos apparently were taken without their consent and admitting that he shared some responsibility.
TRAVEL
April 20, 1986 | BEVERLY BEYER and ED RABEY, Beyer and Rabey are Los Angeles travel writers.
Montezuma II made what proved to be a fatal mistake when he assumed that the strange white creatures who landed on this Yucatan island in 1518 were the legendary plumed serpent god Quetzalcoatl, and his coterie of lesser Aztec deities, even sending food and gifts to the invaders as tribute. The "gods" were Spaniards under Capt.
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