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NEWS
March 12, 2014 | By Lisa Boone
The Los Angeles edition of the Architecture & Design Film Festival kicks off its five-day salute to art, architecture, design, fashion and urban planning Wednesday with showings of "If You Build It," "Design Is One: Massimo & Leila Vignelli" and "16 Acres. " The L.A. film festival, running through Sunday, will feature 30 recent feature-length and short films from around the world. "There is something for everyone who likes design at the festival," said the festival's founder and director, architect Kyle Bergman.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 11, 2014 | By Julie Makinen
BEIJING -- Director-producer John Woo will head up the jury at the fourth annual Beijing International Film Festival , which kicks off April 16, organizers said. Woo, 67, is the Hong Kong helmer of films including "Mission: Impossible II," "A Better Tomorrow," "Red Cliff" and "Face/Off. " The weeklong festival will hold screenings at some 30 theaters throughout China's capital. The international jury will hand out the Tiantan Awards in 10 categories, including best feature, director, actor, actress, cinematography and screenplay.
NEWS
March 11, 2014 | By Jay Jones
The hula, one of Hawaii's best known cultural traditions, will take center stage when the Merrie Monarch Festival returns April 20-26 to the Big Island. The festival is named for King David Kalakaua , a 19th century Hawaiian leader whose nickname, the Merrie Monarch, stemmed from his passion for music and dance. Hilo, on the Big Island, is the host city for the 51-year-old weeklong celebration of ancient and modern hula dancing. The list of activities   begins with a performance by local hula dancers on the morning of April 20. Hula and folk dances from throughout the Pacific will be showcased on the evening of April 23. Activities on April 25 include a performance of ancient-style dances.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 11, 2014 | By Mikael Wood
The biggest act scheduled to perform this week at the annual South by Southwest music festival is also one of the biggest acts in the world. On March 13, Lady Gaga will take to the outdoor stage behind Stubb's for a concert sponsored by Doritos, which is temporarily renaming the barbecue joint #BoldStage (after its line of flavored tortilla chips) and requiring would-be showgoers to complete one of several so-called bold missions to get inside. Yet Lady Gaga won't be the only A-list artist - nor Doritos the only blue-chip brand - at SXSW, set to run March 11 through March 16 in Austin, Texas.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 10, 2014 | By Chris Lee
A certain fatigue had set in for the multiplatinum-selling electronic dance music act Swedish House Mafia in 2012. By the three members' own estimate, they had partied hard five days a week for six years straight, consuming mass quantities of booze and chemical stimulation, living the hedonistic life associated with superstar DJs while traveling the globe to deliver their four-on-the-floor dance delirium to packed arenas. But just as EDM was becoming an increasingly mainstream concern - with the group selling out Madison Square Garden in nine-minutes flat and its smash single "Don't You Worry Child" moving millions of copies to top pop charts around the world - Swedish House Mafia made a controversial decision: to call it quits at the peak of the group's success.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 10, 2014 | By Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times Music Critic
Gerard Mortier, who died of cancer on Saturday at age 70, is being widely eulogized for the incalculable role he played in the opera world in the years he headed opera companies in Brussels, Paris and Madrid. Most notably he revolutionized the Salzburg Festival. I can think of no one more important than the crafty, brilliant Belgian impresario in making opera a uniquely telling, relevant, contemporary and meaningfully controversial art form in Europe. But it wasn't only Europe and it wasn't only opera in which Mortier's influence has proven pervasive.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 8, 2014 | By Reed Johnson
In his classic tome "The Rest Is Noise: Listening to the Twentieth Century," critic Alex Ross compares Minimalism to driving a car "across empty desert, the layered repetitions in the music mirroring the changes that the eye perceives - road signs flashing by, a mountain range shifting on the horizon, a pedal point of asphalt underneath. " Think of the Los Angeles Philharmonic's Minimalist Jukebox festival, then, as a Mojave roadside diner where the menu changes constantly and there's always some unexpected disc spinning hypnotically on the turntable: John Adams' "Naive and Sentimental Music," Steve Reich's "Vermont Counterpoint" or perhaps "Autobahn," the robotic road-trip chamber work by post-human electro-pioneers Kraftwerk.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 7, 2014 | By Randall Roberts, Los Angeles Times Pop Music Critic
These days it gets so crowded at the Low End Theory in Lincoln Heights that by 11 p.m. the door guys stop letting people in. The long-running weekly beat music club, which helped propel the careers of Flying Lotus, DJ Nobody, Nosaj Thing, Tokimonsta, Gaslamp Killer and others, draws fans from around the world who line up each Wednesday. The goal: to gain entry to the second-floor room with a capacity of a few hundred, featuring gut-vibrating bass cabinets, sweat on the walls and nonstop rhythms.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 2014 | By Steven Zeitchik
The Tribeca Film Festival will feature a number of celebrities in front of and behind the camera when it kicks off its 13th edition next month. Chris Messina directs “Alex of Venice,” a marital drama that stars the filmmaker and Mary Elizabeth Winstead as his wife, with a resurgent Don Johnson co-starring. Courtney Cox, meanwhile, will unveil “Just Before I Go,” about a hard-luck man (Sean William Scott) who returns to his hometown to try to settle some scores. Also premiering at the festival, organizers said Thursday, will be Victor Levin's “5 to 7,” a transatlantic romance starring Anton Yelchin, who mined similar territory in Sundance sensation “Like Crazy” a few years back; Susanna Fogel's “Life Partners,” the Millennial friendship dramedy that stars real-life partners Leighton Meester and Adam Brody as well as Gillian Jacobs and Gabourey Sidibe; the Nicole Holofcener-penned “Every Secret Thing,” a mystery involving disappearing children; the Joss Whedon-penned “In Your Eyes,” a metaphysical romance starring Zoe Kazan; and Jesse Zwick's “About Alex,” a dramatic comedy starring Aubrey Plaza, Max Greenfield and Maggie Grace that's described as a “Big Chill for our current social media moment.” BEST MOVIES OF 2013: Turan | Sharkey | Olsen Among the newly announced nonfiction films are the Ann Richards' doc “All About Ann” from Keith Patterson and Phillip Schopper, as well as “Bachelor”...
ENTERTAINMENT
March 4, 2014 | By Steven Zeitchik
Golden Bear winner “Black Coal, Thin Ice,” a Sam Rockwell-Marisa Tomei dramedy  and a documentary about the legacy of Christian Dior will debut at the Tribeca Film Festival when it kicks off next month, organizers announced Tuesday. “Black Coal,” Diao Yinan's Mandarin-language film, is a China-set noir about a mysterious set of murders and the defrocked cop who sets out to solve them. The movie, which has just been announced for a  China release slot, won the top prize -- the Golden Bear -- at the Berlin International Film Festival and the Silver Bear for actor Liao Fan. Meanwhile, Tribeca will see the world premiere of “Loitering With intent,” theater-world crossover Adam Rapp's film about screenwriting and family that stars Tomei and Rockwell.
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