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Ficus Trees

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 26, 2000
Concerning the ficus trees being removed in Westwood (June 19), I wish the same landscape designers would come and remove the ficus trees on Chatsworth Street in Granada Hills and replace them with something new. The ficus trees ruin the concrete sidewalks and, at least in Granada Hills, are trimmed to resemble anything but a tree. Shade would be a welcome addition to any business section of our city. CHRISTOPHER P. MAHONY Northridge
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 20, 2012 | By Joe Piasecki, Los Angeles Times
San Marino's Huntington Drive is in for a dramatic face-lift next year under a city plan to cut down 35 decades-old ficus trees that business owners blame for damaging sidewalks and buildings, leaving messy droppings and obscuring signs. But not everyone is happy to see the trees go. Some residents argue that the large-canopy ficus provide valuable shade and contribute to San Marino's character. Trees along the south side of Huntington between Kenilworth and Del Mar avenues, and on the north side of Huntington from Kenilworth to Ridgeway Road, are targeted for removal.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 20, 2012 | By Joe Piasecki, Los Angeles Times
San Marino's Huntington Drive is in for a dramatic face-lift next year under a city plan to cut down 35 decades-old ficus trees that business owners blame for damaging sidewalks and buildings, leaving messy droppings and obscuring signs. But not everyone is happy to see the trees go. Some residents argue that the large-canopy ficus provide valuable shade and contribute to San Marino's character. Trees along the south side of Huntington between Kenilworth and Del Mar avenues, and on the north side of Huntington from Kenilworth to Ridgeway Road, are targeted for removal.
OPINION
September 8, 2012
Re "Hug the shuttle, not the trees," Editorial, Sept. 6 I'm not a tree hugger, and I cheered when I learned a space shuttle was coming to Los Angeles, my home for 45 years. But anyone would recognize this editorial slant as classically Southern Californian. Obviously, L.A.'s appreciation is not for shade trees, as no one walks. And trees dare not break sidewalk concrete or drop leaves, flowers, sap or fronds. Those ficus trees, tried and convicted for becoming nuisances, were planted long ago in the wrong places and neglected by those who now promise an urban jungle in a few years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 8, 2007 | Molly Hennessy-Fiske
Trump National Golf Course can't keep its new ficus trees because they violate city permits and block neighbors' views, according to the City Council. Donald Trump had the trees planted earlier this year to block golfers' views of what he claims are run-down properties, then asked the council for permission.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 22, 2008 | Francisco Vara-Orta
Santa Monica city officials and activists are headed to court to argue the fate of 54 ficus trees previously set for removal. A hearing scheduled for today was moved to Thursday because a new judge was recently assigned to the case and needed more time to review the arguments, officials said. The city agreed to extend its previous promise to not remove any of the trees in question until after next week's hearing, said Tom Nitti, an attorney representing Treesavers, the informal group of residents and visitors concerned with protecting the city's trees.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 7, 2008 | Evelyn Larrubia
Determined to save 54 ficus trees in Santa Monica, activists on Thursday appealed a judge's ruling allowing the city to remove the trees along 2nd and 4th streets as part of an $8-million beautification project. At issue is the legal question of when activist Jerry Rubin and others should have filed the lawsuit challenging the city's plan, said the group's attorney, Tom Nitti. A lower court judge sided with the city, ruling that the group should have sued within six months of the October 2005 approval of the streetscape plan.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 17, 2002
An Orange County judge Monday gave Newport Beach the go-ahead to remove 25 mature ficus trees from Balboa's historic Main Street, but tree lovers are considering appealing the decision. "We need to move expeditiously," said Stephen Miles, an attorney representing the Balboa Arborist Society. The group had sued to prevent removal of the trees. Orange County Superior Court Judge Ronald L. Bauer, who had earlier blocked the city from removing the trees, declined to extend that order.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 28, 2002 | Vivian LeTran
Siding with local arborists, an Orange County Superior Court judge on Tuesday temporarily blocked the removal of 25 aging ficus trees that have buckled sidewalks and invaded sewer lines in Balboa Village. Judge Ronald L. Bauer ordered Newport Beach not to touch the trees along Main Street until a Sept. 16 hearing. The temporary restraining order could slow the city's $2.8-million street improvement plan in Balboa, which depends on removing the tall, bushy trees.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 18, 2000
Under pressure from a neighborhood group, Los Angeles City Councilwoman Cindy Miscikowski said Tuesday that the city will save the four remaining ficus trees along a street in Brentwood Village from removal. As part of an improvement project, the city in recent weeks removed 32 trees, which had cracked sidewalks and curbs along Barrington Avenue. Residents, however, argued that any problems the trees created were outweighed by their beauty.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 25, 2012 | By Barbara Diamond, Los Angeles Times
A Laguna Beach woman who said she was only seeking a little privacy is now at risk of facing criminal charges if she doesn't trim a row of bushy trees behind her home. Maria Jones said she planted a dozen ficus trees behind her Ocean Way home to provide privacy for her two daughters and herself, but the city says that unless a portion of the trees — which stand about 14 feet tall — are trimmed down, the city will pursue criminal charges. The city said Jones was failing to comply with Laguna Beach's so-called hedge law, which would require her to trim the trees back to 6 feet, 7 inches — just a touch a taller than Kobe Bryant.
HOME & GARDEN
January 5, 2011 | By Lauren Beale, Los Angeles Times
A Palm Springs home once owned by the late film star William Holden is listed at $1,495,000. The post-and-beam Midcentury Modern house has a tongue-and-groove ceiling, terrazzo floor and glass walls. Sitting on nearly an acre of land encircled by ficus trees, the nearly 5,000-square-foot house includes four bedrooms, four bathrooms and a detached guest casita. A wet bar lies poolside. There are two double garages. Holden, who died in 1981 at 63, lived in the house for 18 years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 22, 2009 | Martha Groves
Before organizers could mount a planned protest Saturday, Pasadena public works crews moved in Friday night to cut down about 15 ficus trees along Colorado Boulevard, famed across America as the Rose Parade route. The mature ficus trees had been the focus of much community debate after merchants demanded their removal because the trees were obscuring signs, wrecking sidewalks and damaging plumbing. Ficus supporters say that the trees provide shade and beauty and that the problems could be dealt with in other ways, such as installing rubberized sidewalks to help accommodate root growth and keeping the trees trimmed.
OPINION
February 8, 2009
Re "They won't leaf well enough alone," Jan. 31 The Times only exposed the tip of the iceberg that has made Rancho Palos Verdes a national joke. This city is most noted for lawsuits. It has fought Donald Trump over a flagpole, ficus trees and his resort's street name -- and he has now filed a $100-million lawsuit against the city. In another recent case, a group of landowners proved to the state Court of Appeal that they had been denied their private-property rights when Rancho Palos Verdes would not allow them to build on their land.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 17, 2008 | Francisco Vara-Orta
The 23 ficus trees that have been part of an eight-month dispute in downtown Santa Monica were felled Friday, leaving only seven slated for transplanting at another date. City workers began the chopping at 6 a.m., apparently catching activists off guard. Members of Santa Monica Treesavers had threatened to chain themselves to the trees, and have not ruled out such action to save the trees scheduled for transplanting. The city plans to plant 254 ginkgo trees in the downtown area as part of an $8-million street-improvement project.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 15, 2008 | Bob Pool
A campaign by environmentalists to save 30 mature ficus trees targeted for removal from downtown streets in Santa Monica received a setback Wednesday as a state appeals court ruled attempts to spare the trees came too late. The Treesavers group did not meet the statute of limitations when it filed a claim accusing the city of violating California Environmental Quality Act regulations, according to the court. Despite the ruling, Treesavers will press on with its campaign to save the trees along the business district's 2nd and 4th streets, said group spokesman Jerry Rubin.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 5, 1995 | DUNCAN MARTELL
Clumped in a small grove outside a Ventura cafe, they swayed slightly as they talked, settling into character and readying themselves to pay tribute to the fallen ficus trees along California Street, silent casualties of the downtown revitalization plan. The 12 local artists and writers walked the two blocks quietly and took their places next to the stumps that were capped with orange safety cones. The artists were painted green. They had leaves. And branches.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 9, 2000
A weekend-long vigil to protect the last four ficus trees that have shaded the Brentwood Village shopping district for nearly 50 years will be staged starting today by activists. Los Angeles officials have already cut down 30 trees near Sunset Boulevard and Barrington Avenue as part of a sidewalk repair effort they have dubbed the Brentwood Beautification Project.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 23, 2008 | Francisco Vara-Orta, Times Staff Writer
It's been almost 30 years since his first protest, and he's still a fixture at political events in Los Angeles, protesting with placards, speaking at Santa Monica City Council meetings and walking thousands of miles cross-country -- all for a cause. He's Jerry Rubin, and he's not afraid to hug a tree in public. On a recent afternoon, in fact, Rubin visited Palisades Park in Santa Monica and wrapped his arms around the tree that marked the site of his wedding 25 years ago.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 7, 2008 | Evelyn Larrubia
Determined to save 54 ficus trees in Santa Monica, activists on Thursday appealed a judge's ruling allowing the city to remove the trees along 2nd and 4th streets as part of an $8-million beautification project. At issue is the legal question of when activist Jerry Rubin and others should have filed the lawsuit challenging the city's plan, said the group's attorney, Tom Nitti. A lower court judge sided with the city, ruling that the group should have sued within six months of the October 2005 approval of the streetscape plan.
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