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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 18, 1992
Concerning Joseph Angeo's Feb. 5 letter commenting on Fidel V. Ramos' candidacy to become president of the Philippines, I have a different view. I have known Fidel Ramos since we entered West Point together in 1946 and I began teaching him basic English. I have been proud of him for 45 years as a highly ranked member of our Class of 1950, as a combat soldier fighting alongside U.S. troops against communists in Korea and Vietnam, and as a ranking military officer and civilian official in his country's government.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 8, 1997 | JOHN M. GONZALES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Philippine President Fidel Ramos swept through Los Angeles on Wednesday as part of a four-day mission to strengthen economic and political ties with the Pacific Rim, finding a warm public reception at several of his speaking engagements but some protesters who oppose his policies.
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OPINION
November 5, 1995 | Jim Mann, Jim Mann is a Washington columnist and correspondent for The Times specializing in foreign affairs
Until recently, the Philippines was earning its sobriquet as "the sick man of Asia." In the world's fastest-growing region, the former American colony was an oasis of stagnation and decay. But in the past three years, Philippine President Fidel V. Ramos has brought his country greater political stability and economic growth than it has known for decades. The power blackouts that regularly interrupted daily life in Manila have ended. Factories are sprouting up where the U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 7, 1997
Philippine President Fidel Ramos landed Tuesday in Los Angeles for the first leg of a four-day visit to California, where the leader credited by some for spearheading stability and economic growth in his country is expected to meet some protests.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 8, 1997 | JOHN M. GONZALES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Philippine President Fidel Ramos swept through Los Angeles on Wednesday as part of a four-day mission to strengthen economic and political ties with the Pacific Rim, finding a warm public reception at several of his speaking engagements but some protesters who oppose his policies.
NEWS
March 28, 1985
At least 47 people were killed in clashes between Communist guerrillas and army troops in the southern Philippines, military sources said in Manila. They said the clashes occurred in several parts of southern Mindanao Island in advance of the 16th anniversary of the formation of the insurgent New People's Army. Expecting more violence on the Friday anniversary, the commander of the armed forces, Lt. Gen. Fidel Ramos, placed the army on its highest state of alert, canceling all soldiers' leaves.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 5, 1992
So Corazon Aquino is now officially out of the Philippine presidential election and has endorsed her savior and maker, Fidel Ramos, as her choice and standard-bearer (Jan. 25). Between the two there is little difference. Ramos is just a male version of Aquino. Like her, he is weak, incompetent and full of empty rhetoric. Above all, both try to project themselves as saintly and having the mandate of God to rule the country. Ramos has smoked too many cigars for him to think that he can manage the Philippines.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 7, 1997
Philippine President Fidel Ramos landed Tuesday in Los Angeles for the first leg of a four-day visit to California, where the leader credited by some for spearheading stability and economic growth in his country is expected to meet some protests.
NEWS
September 2, 1987 | MARK FINEMAN, Times Staff Writer
The Philippine armed forces chief of staff, declaring that loyal troops narrowly averted a civil war in crushing last week's attempted coup, called on President Corazon Aquino on Tuesday to convene the National Security Council immediately because the situation is still critical and further rebellion is possible. The council, a joint military-civilian policy-making body that Aquino has never called into session, was created at the urging of the chief of staff, Gen. Fidel V.
NEWS
February 11, 1992 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To hear Congressman Joe de Venecia tell it--and it was hard not to, since he was shouting into the microphone in the Metro Club's crowded conference room--the world owes a debt of thanks to Fidel V. (Eddie) Ramos. Ramos helped lead the inspiring 1986 military-backed "people power" revolt that toppled dictator Ferdinand E. Marcos and installed Corazon Aquino as president. And that led, the speaker shouted, to the collapse of corrupt dictatorships and Communist regimes around the world.
OPINION
November 5, 1995 | Jim Mann, Jim Mann is a Washington columnist and correspondent for The Times specializing in foreign affairs
Until recently, the Philippines was earning its sobriquet as "the sick man of Asia." In the world's fastest-growing region, the former American colony was an oasis of stagnation and decay. But in the past three years, Philippine President Fidel V. Ramos has brought his country greater political stability and economic growth than it has known for decades. The power blackouts that regularly interrupted daily life in Manila have ended. Factories are sprouting up where the U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 10, 1992
Your editorial "A Reformer? Or Another Marcos?" (July 1) missed the point by a city block. Do you seriously expect President Ramos to "improve basic services, restore law and order and dedicate himself to 'empowering' the people," when even Marcos with all his dictorial powers was unable to do just that? How will a constitutionally straitjacketed Fidel Ramos manage it? Besides, don't count on Philippine leaders to change anything. The recent elections were a good show presented for worldwide viewing but irrelevant to the ordinary Filipino upon whom I heap most of the blame for the country's insoluable problems.
NEWS
February 11, 1992 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To hear Congressman Joe de Venecia tell it--and it was hard not to, since he was shouting into the microphone in the Metro Club's crowded conference room--the world owes a debt of thanks to Fidel V. (Eddie) Ramos. Ramos helped lead the inspiring 1986 military-backed "people power" revolt that toppled dictator Ferdinand E. Marcos and installed Corazon Aquino as president. And that led, the speaker shouted, to the collapse of corrupt dictatorships and Communist regimes around the world.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 5, 1992
So Corazon Aquino is now officially out of the Philippine presidential election and has endorsed her savior and maker, Fidel Ramos, as her choice and standard-bearer (Jan. 25). Between the two there is little difference. Ramos is just a male version of Aquino. Like her, he is weak, incompetent and full of empty rhetoric. Above all, both try to project themselves as saintly and having the mandate of God to rule the country. Ramos has smoked too many cigars for him to think that he can manage the Philippines.
NEWS
September 2, 1987 | MARK FINEMAN, Times Staff Writer
The Philippine armed forces chief of staff, declaring that loyal troops narrowly averted a civil war in crushing last week's attempted coup, called on President Corazon Aquino on Tuesday to convene the National Security Council immediately because the situation is still critical and further rebellion is possible. The council, a joint military-civilian policy-making body that Aquino has never called into session, was created at the urging of the chief of staff, Gen. Fidel V.
NEWS
March 28, 1985
At least 47 people were killed in clashes between Communist guerrillas and army troops in the southern Philippines, military sources said in Manila. They said the clashes occurred in several parts of southern Mindanao Island in advance of the 16th anniversary of the formation of the insurgent New People's Army. Expecting more violence on the Friday anniversary, the commander of the armed forces, Lt. Gen. Fidel Ramos, placed the army on its highest state of alert, canceling all soldiers' leaves.
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