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Fidel V Ramos

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NEWS
June 30, 1992
In the first peaceful transition of power in the Philippines in a quarter-century, Fidel V. Ramos will be inaugurated today in Manila as the country's eighth president, replacing the departing Corazon Aquino, who did not run for reelection. Ramos, 64, a retired general who served as Aquino's defense secretary, was elected with the smallest mandate in Philippine history--only 24% of the vote in a seven-way race.
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NEWS
April 11, 1998 | From Associated Press
Philippine President Fidel V. Ramos and President Clinton reinforced their nations' economic and security ties Friday, but their working lunch yielded no resolution to disputes over Filipino veterans' benefits or the return of two Philippine church bells.
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NEWS
February 11, 1992 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To hear Congressman Joe de Venecia tell it--and it was hard not to, since he was shouting into the microphone in the Metro Club's crowded conference room--the world owes a debt of thanks to Fidel V. (Eddie) Ramos. Ramos helped lead the inspiring 1986 military-backed "people power" revolt that toppled dictator Ferdinand E. Marcos and installed Corazon Aquino as president. And that led, the speaker shouted, to the collapse of corrupt dictatorships and Communist regimes around the world.
NEWS
September 21, 1997 | From Associated Press
President Fidel V. Ramos said Saturday that he will not run for reelection, but he stopped short of halting a campaign by supporters to change the constitution so he could serve a second term. Ramos' pledge not to run, made on the eve of a large-scale protest against the charter changes, was a reversal of his earlier commitment to keep his options open until a party convention in November. The Philippine Constitution, written after the 1986 ouster of Ferdinand E.
NEWS
December 23, 1996 | From Times Wire Reports
President Fidel V. Ramos underwent cardiovascular surgery in Manila and was in good condition, senior government officials said. Agriculture Secretary Salvador Escudero told reporters that the surgery was successful and that the president was in "super" condition. When Ramos, 68, was admitted to the hospital, doctors said he was to undergo checks because of an earlier throat infection. But television reports said he was tested for a blockage in an artery.
NEWS
May 13, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Miriam Defensor Santiago expressed confidence that her early lead in the Philippine presidential tally would withstand any challenge from the other candidates to replace Corazon Aquino, who declined to seek another term. But election officials cautioned that no trend in the presidential voting will be apparent before the weekend. The latest count showed Santiago ahead with 536,644 votes, or about 27%. Former Defense Secretary Fidel V. Ramos had 461,078 votes, or about 23%.
NEWS
May 11, 1995 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
President Fidel V. Ramos claimed an overwhelming midterm endorsement of his 3-year-old government that he said will allow him to speed up economic reforms and place more emphasis on solving social problems. Ramos' coalition was leading in 10 of 12 Senate races as counting continued from Monday's elections, according to the unofficial National Movement for Free Elections. Ramos also said his allies were leading in 183 of 204 House races as well as 68 of 76 provincial governorships.
NEWS
December 25, 1996 | From Times Wire Reports
President Fidel V. Ramos was back on his feet a day after undergoing surgery in Manila to remove a blockage in a major artery. He said he was feeling "very well." Dressed in a yellow T-shirt and hospital pajamas and waving an unlit cigar, Ramos spoke to reporters in his hospital suite after meeting senior Cabinet ministers there.
NEWS
February 9, 1992 | Associated Press
Many of the candidates hoping to succeed Philippine President Corazon Aquino formally kicked off their campaigns Saturday, but Aquino made good her promise not to run. Ignoring Friday's filing deadline, Aquino defied skeptics by becoming the first incumbent president not to file for reelection. Instead, she endorsed former Defense Secretary Fidel V. Ramos as her favorite in the May 11 election.
NEWS
August 23, 1988
Two men opened fire outside a restaurant in the Manila suburb of Makati where South Korean opposition leader Kim Dae Jung was attending a dinner party with Philippine Defense Secretary Fidel V. Ramos, police said. Neither Kim nor Ramos were injured in the gun battle, in which one assailant and two of Ramos' bodyguards were wounded.
NEWS
December 25, 1996 | From Times Wire Reports
President Fidel V. Ramos was back on his feet a day after undergoing surgery in Manila to remove a blockage in a major artery. He said he was feeling "very well." Dressed in a yellow T-shirt and hospital pajamas and waving an unlit cigar, Ramos spoke to reporters in his hospital suite after meeting senior Cabinet ministers there.
NEWS
December 23, 1996 | From Times Wire Reports
President Fidel V. Ramos underwent cardiovascular surgery in Manila and was in good condition, senior government officials said. Agriculture Secretary Salvador Escudero told reporters that the surgery was successful and that the president was in "super" condition. When Ramos, 68, was admitted to the hospital, doctors said he was to undergo checks because of an earlier throat infection. But television reports said he was tested for a blockage in an artery.
NEWS
May 19, 1995 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Fidel V. Ramos was elected president of the Philippines three years ago, he won only 23% of the popular vote, and the only member of his political party to win a Senate seat was his sister. With such a thin mandate, Ramos immediately ran into difficulties trying to push his program of economic reforms through Congress. For a while, there were fears that he would follow in the footsteps of his predecessor, Corazon Aquino, as the head of an administration characterized by inaction.
NEWS
May 11, 1995 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
President Fidel V. Ramos claimed an overwhelming midterm endorsement of his 3-year-old government that he said will allow him to speed up economic reforms and place more emphasis on solving social problems. Ramos' coalition was leading in 10 of 12 Senate races as counting continued from Monday's elections, according to the unofficial National Movement for Free Elections. Ramos also said his allies were leading in 183 of 204 House races as well as 68 of 76 provincial governorships.
NEWS
November 23, 1993 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton and Philippine President Fidel V. Ramos vowed Monday to work out a "new partnership" between their two countries, including increased security cooperation, in an effort to ease tensions caused by the ouster of American forces from former U.S. bases in the Philippines.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 15, 1993 | CHRISTINA LIMA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Filipino residents in Carson and other communities are anxiously awaiting Philippine President Fidel V. Ramos' scheduled visit next month to Los Angeles in which he plans to seek American investment in his country and persuade well-educated Filipinos to return. A visit to Carson and Long Beach has not been ruled out, although officials say it is unlikely because neither city has a venue secure enough to satisfy the Secret Service.
NEWS
January 21, 1992
The already chaotic race to succeed Corazon Aquino promises to speed up further come Saturday when the Philippine president, who will not run again, announces her favorite among at least nine candidates already jockeying for position in the May 11 vote. Her expected choice: former Defense Secretary Fidel V. Ramos, a terse, cigar-chomping West Point graduate who remained loyal through seven mutinies and coup attempts during Aquino's nearly six years in office.
NEWS
July 20, 1993
President Fidel V. Ramos is to open a joint session of the Philippine Congress next Monday with a state-of-the-nation speech expected to dwell on his plans for economic growth in this impoverished country.
NEWS
July 23, 1993 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As usual, President Fidel V. Ramos was up at 4 a.m. and already chomping on his first thick cigar by 7 a.m. And as usual, he had stuffed spare stogies down his socks for the long day ahead. The day--a typical one for this peripatetic president--included what initially appeared to be an assassination attempt. Ramos' security guards grabbed a man who drew a .45-caliber pistol a few feet away from the passing president during his visit to this steamy provincial capital in southern Luzon.
NEWS
July 20, 1993
President Fidel V. Ramos is to open a joint session of the Philippine Congress next Monday with a state-of-the-nation speech expected to dwell on his plans for economic growth in this impoverished country.
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